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2017 Shakespeare In The Park -05/23-08/13/17 *NYC

Free for all. All summer. Every summer.

Watch the announcement of Free Shakespeare in the Park on Facebook Live.

JULIUS CAESAR
Directed by Oskar Eustis

May 23- June 18

The Public Theater’s Artistic Director Oskar Eustis directs Julius Caesar, Shakespeare’s play of politics and power, last seen in the Park 17 years ago. Rome’s leader, Julius Caesar, is a force unlike any the city has seen. Magnetic, populist, irreverent, he seems bent on absolute power. A small band of patriots, devoted to the country’s democratic traditions, must decide how to oppose him. Shakespeare’s political masterpiece has never felt more contemporary.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM
Directed by Lear deBessonet

July 11- August 13

In July, the Delacorte Theater will transform into the most enchanted forest in all of theater in Shakespeare’s beloved comedy, A Midsummer Night’s Dream. When the merry sprite Puck meddles with a magical love potion, young lovers lost in the woods mysteriously find themselves infatuated with the wrong person in this hilarious, fairytale fantasia that proves the course of true love never did run smooth. Lear deBessonet, Founder of the groundbreaking Public Works program and Resident Director, brings her electric theatrical vision to the classic romance about the supernatural nature of love.

Free tickets to Shakespeare in the Park will be available on every day there is a public performance. Visit shakespeareinthepark.org for more info.


Lead support for Free Shakespeare in the Park provided by
Bank of America and The Jerome L. Greene Foundation.

Additional support provided by Bloomberg Philanthropies, Delta Air Lines, TodayTix, The Kimberly, The New York Times, Outfront Media, WNYC, ABC7, Theatermania, NYC Parks, New York City Department Of Cultural Affairs, The New York State Council On The Arts, and Art Works. 

Special support provided by The New York Community Trust- The George T. Delacorte Fund for Performance at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park.

The Philip and Janice Levin Foundation provides support for The Public’s access and engagement programming. The LuEsther T. Mertz Charitable Trustprovides  leadership support for The Public Theater’s year-round activities.

Photos by Joseph Moran and Tammy Shell

February 11, 2017 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , | Leave a comment

CONFERENCES Theater Music Dance Arts APAP NYC 2017 Jan 3-10, NYC

The Association of Performing Arts Presenters (APAP) will bring more than 3,600 artists and performing industry leaders from the worlds of dance, theater, music, opera, family programing and more to New York City Jan. 6-10. Preconference workshops and events, many of which are free and open to the public, take place Jan. 5-6. You will especially want to attend and cover plenary sessions, where major artists and leaders from arts, culture and other sectors will share their perspectives on conference themes and engage with the audience of local, national and global arts professionals. Please also spread the word early that plenaries are also live streamed.

APAP works to advance the global performing arts industry, and the annual conference offers one-on-one contact and shared experience and insights for members, the public, and the media. The event provides significant opportunities, economically and creatively, for the range of constituents comprising the performing arts presenting field. This year APAP|NYC will feature artists and arts leaders at the top of their fields; more than 1,000 world-class performance showcases; more than 370 exhibitors promoting their artists and their work in the EXPO Hall; more than 60 professional development sessions and intensives, some open to the public; the annual APAP awards luncheon, and a free classical music concert at Carnegie Hall.

Highlights

The conference again provides a platform for artists, presenters, promoters, and other performing arts professionals to reflect and engage in discussions and solutions around pressing current issues such as cultural conflict and social justice—issues that have intensified since last January and that resonate throughout our communities in the U.S. and worldwide, fueling our collective need for innovation and creativity.

 

•The opening plenary Friday at 5:00 pm will include

welcome remarks from  Mario Garcia Durham, President and CEO of APAP,

opening remarks from a nationally-known arts and cultural leader (to be confirmed),

followed by a panel discussion moderated by Robyn Archer, Deputy Chair of the Australia Council.

Panelists will include several dynamic thought leaders such as

Chicana activist Martha Gonzalez, who is a singer/percussionist with Quetzal, a bilingual (Spanish-English) Chicano rock band from East Los Angeles

and Jose Antonio Vargas, founder of Define American.

An additional speaker will join the above to explore how artists and cultural leaders, in collaboration with agent/managers, presenters and other co-producers have the potential to serve as catalysts for positive community engagement that leads to social change and social justice.

•At the 9:00 am featured session Saturday, “Changing the Flow: Creativity, Innovation and Disruption at Work,”

Steven Tepper, dean of the new Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at ASU will lead a discussion

with digital media expert Michael Hawley and others to explore the creative capacities needed to advance culture, build community and address the most pressing challenges of today. (The institute at ASU is a think tank that brings high-powered creatives together to reconsider how we talk about the arts as a creative and innovative force.) The session is followed by breakout discussion groups.

•Sessions that tie to APAP year around programs, grants and resources, including:

oAPAP’s Building Bridges:  Arts, Culture, and Identity grants program, aimed at building greater knowledge and awareness about Muslim societies and how to affect social change in these troubled times

oThe Cultural Exchange Laboratory (CXL), a new tool and resource to support the process of identifying, booking and touring international artists

oA session on how to use marketing research to build arts audiences, including hints on designing and applying market research activities to arts organizations (based on The Wallace Foundation’s Building Arts Audiences initiative)

oSharing of experiences by members of the first cohort of APAP Leadership Fellows who reach across generations, gender, job sectors and other ways performing arts professionals identify themselves in the presenting field

•The APAP|NYC “5 Minutes to SHINE!” competition Jan. 9 at 9:30 a.m., where artists, presenters, agents and other industry professionals share a compelling story or idea in an exciting pecha kucha format and the audience votes on one winner to present at the Annual APAP|NYC Awards Luncheon the same day

•New this year, each plenary will open with a “creative moment,” a brief performance or guided creative experience that provokes, inspires or otherwise sets the stage for the conversation that follows (e.g. spoken word artist Marc Bamuthi Joseph and violinist Daniel Bernard Roumain before Friday’s opening plenary; and Heidi Latsky’s piece, “On Display,” with up to 50 dancers with disabilities strategically placed across the entrance area to the Saturday plenary session.

•Each year the popular, fast-moving pecha kucha-style plenary Saturday at noon features five ultra-creative artists that talk about their source of inspiration, their career arc, and their place in these challenging times.

APAP|NYC 2017 is a monumental gathering of performers, agents, presenters, producers and more, with great stories to tell and mesmerizing visuals everywhere you look.

Plenary and Featured Speaker Highlights:

•Taylor Mac whose recent work, “A 24-Decade History of Popular Music,” speaks directly to today’s headlines around equality, equity, civility and our fundamental human rights; his recent 24-hour marathon performance was featured in The New York Times, and he was recently reviewed by The  Guardian.

•Camille A. Brown, dancer, choreographer, and founder of Camille A. Brown & Dancers, which is recognized for its introspective approach to cultural themes through visceral movement and socio-political dialogues.

•Maysoon Zayid, Arab-American comedienne, writer and tap dancer from New Jersey; at her TED Talk she said “I got 99 problems…palsy is just one”

•Paola Prestini, plays the German lieder and composed the new production of the opera “Gilgamesh”

•Jonah Bokaer, choreographer and media artist whose latest collaboration with Daniel Arsham and Pharrell Williams, “Rules of the Game,” is in the midst of a global tour.

•Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, dancer, teacher and choreographer of modern dance, and founder of Urban Bush Women dance company

•Jose Antonio Vargas, who started the platform called “Defining American,” and explores the question, “What does it mean to be American?” He is a Filipino immigrant who is gay, and thus has been through most of the identity battles

•Aaron Dworkin, dean, School of Music, Theater and Dance; University of Michigan

•Steven Tepper, dean, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts

December 24, 2016 Posted by | avant-garde, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, HOLIDAY GUIDES, Music, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , | Leave a comment

Submissions for Playwrights of Color!Dec 1 Deadline

2017 POCS Submissions

Quick Silver Theater Company’s

open (Blind) playwright submission process has begun.

The deadline for submissions is December 1st, 2016

For the second year in a row,

Quick Silver Theater Company has commited to the development of emerging playwrights of color.

 

Our Playwrights of Color Summit will offer three select playwrights a week long retreat in Geneva, NY.  Playwrights will receive a stipend, room and board.  A director and cast will be selected to work alongside each playwright.

 

Here is an opportunity to engage with like minded artists in an easeful environment.  A script in hand reading of your work will be presented at the end of the week followed by a skillfully guided talk back open to the  community of Geneva and your peers.

QST’s hosting campuses of Hobart and William Smith Colleges are just a stones throw away from Seneca Lake.  The peaceful environs of Geneva will spark your creative juices.   A secluded yet inspiring work space on the campus will also be provided.

Become a part of the annual process.

It’s all about the words.  Invigorate, Educate and Generate conversation.

We look forward to hearing from you.

This amazing experience should not be missed.

November 29, 2016 Posted by | BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Theatre/Profiles: Audelco Award Nominee WALK HARD actress Gabrielle C. Archer

The Audelco Awards are the Independent Black Theatre Awards equivalent to the TONY’S.

On Nov. 21, the 44th Annual Vivian Robinson AUDELCO Recognition Awards for Excellence in Black Theatre will be  given in Neew York City, New York, at Symphony Space.

Vivian Robinson established AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee) as a non-profit membership organization in 1973. At the time, the AUDELCO awards were the only awards ceremony to celebrate the accomplishments of African Americans in the fields of theatre and dance. The principal mission of the AUDELCO Awards is to enhance a comprehension of the arts in African-American communities. The AUDELCO Awards also aim to generate new audiences for non-profit theatre companies and to ensure better public relations.

We had a chance to interview one of the RISING stars, actress Gabrielle C. Archer

headshot

Describe your latest play and your role:

This past Spring I played Ruth in Walk Hard directed by Imani Douglas and written by Abraham Hill, founder of the American Negro Theatre. Ruth is girlfriend to protagonist, Andy Whitman. Andy is a bright but stubborn shine boy turned boxer in Jim Crow New York. The battles inside the ring mirror those outside of it. I believe Ruth to be the moral compass of the play and for Andy. She tries to keep him focused but cool headed & reasonable. She believes power is in organizing. She is part of the nascent movement of unions budding in the late 30s. 

I loved Ruth. She is a strong and powerful woman. A wise and tender soul with whom I nonetheless parted ways in the play’s finale. In my mind, I thought her final words were a bit of a sell out. She speaks of the struggle being that of poor people in general. True words that are a bit All Lives Matter to me. An actor mustn’t judge his character, though, but rather try his best to understand him. Those were my personal feelings, I kept them separate. At the end of the day she was her own kind of warrior and Andy’s rock. 

I was really honored to be part of a team of  much more experienced and talented actors  in a little downtown theatre with a lot of repute with regards to show-casing challenging, subversive, engaging and political pieces. The Metropolitan Playhouse always hosts talk backs after the Sundaymatinees of every run. These talk-backs are enlightening. On our last talk back we had the delightful surprise of having playwright Mr Hill’s family there to exchange ideas and reactions. It’ll always be one of my proudest moment having them express great pleasure at our telling of the story. It was a fun and growing experience all in all.

You have done a lot of theatre work . Is the stage your preferred platform?

I’ve mainly done theatre, yes. I haven’t fully delved into the world of film. I have done a few indies but I do feel more comfortable on stage. By comfortable I by no means mean that I don’t get utterly nervous each time I do a play, but I like the continuity and chronology of stage work. Once you step on that stage there is no turning back -you have to be in every moment till the curtain goes down. Film is very intimate and requires different techniques I must hone. I plan on increasing my experience in that field. 

You notched Shakespeare on your belt in CORIOLANUS. 

Explain the attraction of Shakespeare for actors.

It’s the great frontier. He is a poet, a master of language and story-telling. Shakespearian language is intimidating but beautiful and fun. I’ve always loved language for language itself and anyone who does can appreciate the rhythm, music of Shakespeare’s tales. 

Actors are always training. what are you studying now?

I hadn’t taken a class in far too long (it’s expensive and I figured let me get in there and learn by dong it and doing it with experienced, better actors to keep me on my toes). But acting is a muscle that must constantly be worked out in order not to atrophy. No excuses.

 I got lucky and came upon Alice Spivak through an actor friend of mine. She has been in the industry for a long time and studied with the classic teachers. Her class is very enjoyable and challenging. She is tender and knowledgeable. I am at the moment juggling with 4( soon to be 5) characters ranging from Shakespeare to Chekhov to Neil Simon. It’s great fun being in a class of broad age range and an array of talent from advanced to professional.

How is it? do you have a preferred style or method? what and why? 

Alice bases her teaching on the Stanislavsky technique but strays from it as well. She’s brilliant! Studying your craft is so important but I believe in using tools from all techniques and mixing it up for whatever works for you in a given circumstance. 

The interview continues below…

Metropolitan Playhouse
The American Legacy

220 East Fourth Street ~ New York, New York 10009
Administration: (212) 995 8410  ~  Tickets: (800) 838 3006

A 2007 Company of the Year ~ nytheatre.com

Follow us….

 

Home
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2015-2016 Season
AUDELCO VIV Award Nominee
Best Revival
“A major rediscovery….a cast that excels.”
Peter Filichia
“An electrifying revival”
– Victor Gluck,
Joshua David Scarlett and Peter Tedeschi
photo: Jacob J. Goldberg Photography

What’s worth the fight?

Walk Hard
by Abram Hill
February 19 – March 20, 2016

A bright young man with quick fists is given the shot to be a champion boxer… if he is willing to accept the racist rules that govern America of the 1930’s.

A play from the co-founder of the
American Negro Theater.

Read More about the play and
The American Negro Theater

Running Time: 2:00

SUNDAY TALKBACKS…following the matinees
February/March 2016
Sun Mon Tues
Weds Thurs Fri Sat
19

7:30 pm

20

7:30 pm

21
3 pm
22

7:30 pm

23 24 25

7:30 pm

26

7:30 pm

27

7:30 pm

28
3 pm
TALK
29 1 2 3

7:30 pm

4

7:30 pm

5

7:30 pm

6
3 pm
TALK
7 8 9
3 pm
10

7:30 pm

11

7:30 pm

12
3 pm
7:30 pm
13
3 pm
TALK
14 15 16
3 pm
17

7:30 pm

18

7:30 pm

19
3 pm
7:30 pm
20
3 pm
TALK
Featuring:
Frank Anderson*
Gabrielle C. Archer
Craig Anthony Bannister*
Michael Basile*
Sean Michael Buckley*
Chris Krause
Beethovan Oden*
Joshua David Scarlett
Vanessa Shaw
Joy Sudduth
Peter Tedeschi*
Kim Yancey-Moore*

Crew:
DIRECTOR Imani
STAGE MANAGER  William Vann Carlton*
LIGHTING Melody Beal
COSTUME  Sidney Fortner
SOUND  Bill Toles
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR  LaVonda Elam

*These actors and stage manager appear courtesy of
Actors Equity Association.
Walk Hard is an AEA Approved Showcase

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You are fluent in French and studied at the Sorbonne. What was that experience like?

I used my year abroad to go home for a year and live alone. I studied Literature, Psychology and a bit of Film at the Sorbonne and at Paris X Nanterre University (where my mother went). These schools are polar opposites. The Sorbonne is a prestigious and picturesque school in the heart of Paris whereas Nanterre is a large, more modern public university with little architectural charm on the outskirts of the city. Both are good and have historical value. I enjoyed going from one to the other and learned from each. I preferred Nanterre which had more warmth -in my experience- than the Sorbonne with its intimidating cold marble floors and quiet hallways. The classes there were challenging and mind-titillating. Nanterre was vibrant with more diverse, “on the fringe”, young  minds. 

Paris is just as contrasted and contradictory. You can get lost in the streets of Paris for hours on end…  It is eternally beautiful but within it is a lot of sadness, dissatisfaction, anger and divide. It’s still one of the prettiest places I’ve ever seen. I saw a lot of ugly, but Paris has timeless charm, great food, culture and love of Philosophy*. (*that endless search for truth/knowledge)

You have also directed and recently started in production as well. Does that appeal to you? Why or why not?

I’d like to do more of both. Any production is good, hard team work. We’re all essential pieces of a puzzle. I’m interested in seeing all sides of things. Learning more about every aspect of my industry can only help me in my craft.

Producing is multitasking and problem solving. Developing those skills is interesting to me and will be useful. 

Directing is multi-tasking but it’s more focused. You are painting a picture. As of now, I still have work to do in terms of seeing and creating a Vision. But I can do detail -I’m an actor- so, I’m more of an actor’s director. I know how to speak to my fellow actors in order to bring out what’s needed for the overall picture. There is a language we share, an energy and a deep understanding. I need more notches on my belt to really feel comfortable with the title of director. It was a scary and very fulfilling to manage a 12 person cast under pressure. My mentor at the time would just say, “You have to make a decision. It’s going up.”

That was a great learning experience for me and I can’t wait to get another opportunity to gain more confidence and skill in that realm. 

Describe your training and background.

I’m born in Paris. Left there when I was 7 and came to New York. I went to the French Lycée, graduated with a Literature/Philosophy Baccalaureat. I then attended Amherst College (even kicked it with Lupita!). I then moved back to New York and kind of threw myself into it in a non orthodox way. I started with community theatre in Brooklyn, working with a church-based theatre troupe on a one act play called One Hour 2 Live. It told the story of a young man -a gang recruit- on death row visited by a pastor who wants to reconcile him with his devastating actions. The young man is also visited by his victims. Two of the three victims are acquaintances and I, the third, played a complete stranger. I represented a future cut short as well as the daughter he would have had. The young man is forced to delve into his past and the psychology behind what brought him to this point. It was a very powerful play which we performed throughout the boroughs and New Jersey at middle and high schools, churches, community and family centers etc. We’d have talk backs with the children (and often the boys would go off with the male actors) as well as with community leaders and mothers/family members affected by incarceration and the consequences of gang activity. We even performed at Rikers. (I had mixed feelings about that.) It was a very emotional and (sometimes) fulfilling experience. 

This is people’s real lives- it’s tough. If we were able to reach just one kid in that crowd and inspire them to stay focused, know their worth then it was worth it.  

I did that for four years and then worked an entire year on a play that would be my debut as a young professional actress (Agnes of God). It very abruptly and at the very last minute fell through and that was a painful (even a bit traumatizing) experience. But through it I met my friend and mentor, Leslie Dockery (a broadway vet, dancer, choreographer extraordinaire) and through her I found a whole community of mentors with 30 years of experience under their belt who have embraced me. I’m the baby in the group and have a ways to go. But this vet black theatre community seems to have taken me under their wing and I am blessed to have that support. My journey brought me to Imani Douglas, the Castillo Theatre (which is volunteer based with strong youth community involvement)  and, finally, the Metropolitan Playhouse which is a prestigious little downtown theatre. Simultaneously, in indie film I have found a network of young, ambitious like-minded creators and story-tellers. 

I hope to keep expanding my horizons and make proud all the people who have helped me along the way. I’ve been lucky to have them. 

What does the Audelco nomination mean to you?

The AUDELCO (Audience Development Commitee, Inc.) Recognition Awards or the “Viv Awards” (a wink to founder Vivian Robinson)  honors excellence in the black theatre at professional and non-for-profit levels. It is a pioneer organization, based out of Harlem, that has been around since the 70’s & has awarded many of the greats of the African-American theatre community (such as composer Eubie Blake, choreographer Debbie Allen and even Kerry Washington before Scandal).  It’s like the black Tony Awards! This’ll be my second time going. The first time I went as co-director of a new play Leslie Dockery and I put up at Theatre for The New  City in downtown Manhattan. She was up for Best Choreography and won! That was exciting. She’s been around for a while now and I’m lucky to call her big sister, mentor and friend.

I definitely felt Walk Hard deserved a nod or some recognition because the talent was top-notch and the story is inspiring and quite relevant to today. It was a happy and humbling surprise to find out we were nominated for Best Revival! 

Keeps raising the bar for me which is always the goal and I get to be around and part of yet another piece of Black History.

You come from an illustrious family background. Explain.

Growing up I had the blessing of calling a living piece of history my grand-father or G-daddy -as my sister and I liked to call him. He was our very own piece of World, American and Black History!

My grand-father, Lee Andrew Archer was a Tuskeegee Airman. He was part of the 332nd Fighter Group and became the first black Ace (he shot down 5 enemy fighter aircraft). He flew the “Macon Belle” named after my beautiful grand-mother, Ina, born in Macon, Georgia. He later maintained a career in the US Airforce as a Lieutenant Colonel. After retiring from the military, he became a successful business man and mentor to other successful black business men. In 2004 he received the French Legion of Honor. That was a proud day for us as a family. I remember being there on the coast of Normandy and being thrilled at just how unique and special he was. In 2007 he received the Congressional Medal. At the end of the day, though, he was just our grand-daddy who provided us with a great family foundation and a lucky childhood. We knew how cool he was but naturally, in retrospect and as I get older, I regret not having asked more questions. I just hope to continue to make him proud and share his story and strong legacy. Y parents are also diplomats and writers.

Do you have a specific plan for the future?

I want to venture more into film and work on television eventually. I want to experience what the industry is like in Atlanta and then L.A. I’d love to do a French film. French cinema (especially the New Wave era) has always been inspiring to me. 

Essentially, I want to continue expanding my horizons while working on inspiring projects and telling unique and/or important stories.

Right now I’m working on Miranda –  a film that will bring awareness to domestic abuse. The talent is immense but the funds are limited. If anyone would like to help bring this project to fruition please go to www.gofundme.com/mirandamovie and you can check out director’s previous work at kentsuttton.com. Thanks for the support!

What was your most satisfying performance to you?

I really enjoyed playing “One Dropper” Emma in One Drop a piece by Andrea Fulton set in 1800s Louisiana. It’s based on her family history and tells of an African-American couple who chose to stay in their community and prosper rather than leave and pass. It spoke to me on a very deep level. I particularly liked how beautifully it communicated a part of Black History to children and all ages through original New Orleans music and classical story-telling form.

I think performing for the youth earlier in my career was the most fulfilling for me. Children are our most important and essential resource. To have them come talk to us after each show, just looking to connect, receive advice, inspiration, motivation, recognition, things we all need and deserve, was very rewarding. One Hour 2 Live was a tough play (written by a pastor in Brooklyn tired of counseling those affected by gang violence) but it had a cathartic effect on who needed it. I’ll never forget the one time a young woman cried out in the middle of the play and had to be escorted out. That was difficult, staying in character during that moment. I hope we didn’t hurt her heart but rather opened it because she felt heard, noticed and cared for. I’ll also always remember a little boy -one of many- standing up after a performance and vowing unprompted to choose his friends wisely and focus on being his best self. Hearing the youth speak -express themselves so intelligently- while surrounded by a caring community of mothers, parents and teachers was the most satisfying. 

What would you like your legacy to be?

I want to stay true to myself – my complicated, imperfect self- tell stories from all walks of life (the good, the bad, the beautiful and the ugly) so we can stop judging each other and see our common humanity.

I’d like to make my grand-daddy proud. Keep telling important stories but also have fun. 

I want to reach children and inspire them. I want to spread love, warmth, self-worth and respect for our elders, our history, our ancestry, what brought us all to this point as we look forward and live our biggest life. 

I’m not literate enough in the history of Black Theatre to give much of an opinion except that I am so happy and proud that its legacy is being so wonderfully upheld. Black theaters such as the National Black Theatre, based in ever-changing Harlem, are still up and kicking and need our continued support. Brilliant talents like Danai Gurira who are telling stories never told on Broadway and opening eyes so eloquently are very motivating!

Playing Salome was fun. She is the ultimate femme fatale but she is also a child. The role was divided in two and I played her innocent side -which wasn’t quite as appealing to me. I nonetheless enjoyed delving into the Old World and using elevated almost Shakespearian language. 

My advice to newcomers would be study, work and surround yourself with ambitious people. Find mentors to help guide you. Creating a strong reel and having a strong headshot is also essential. 

Thank You, Ms. Archer!

The AUDELCO AWARDS will be presented November 21, 2016 in New York City

Walk Hard
by Abram Hill

co-founder of the American Negro Theater

 Walk Hard

Joshua David Scarlett
photo: Alex Roe

What’s worth fighting for?

February 19 – March 20, 2016

 METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE
220 E 4th Street
New York, NY

800 838 3006

 

Previews Begin
Friday, February 19th

Opening Night
Friday, February 26th
Performance and Reception
7:30 pm

Performances through March 20th

From 1944

Working as a shoeshine boy in 1939, nineteen-year-old Andy Whitman’s ambition is limited only by the color of his skin.
Bright, industrious, and black, his daily struggle makes make him quick with his temper and his fists.
When he catches the eye of a boxing manager in a street fight, Andy is soon a rising star in a fast-paced game.
But it is a game of devil’s bargains, played with dubious partners, and some rules never change when a black man looks for respect in a white world.

We are delighted to revive this remarkable drama as part of our 24th Season,
The Season of Hope.

 

METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE
220 E 4th Street
New York, NY

Walk Hard

February 19th – March 20th, 2016

Thursdays – Saturdays at 7:30 pm
Sundays at 3 pm

PLUS
Pay What You Will: Monday, 2/22 at 7:30pm
Added Matinees: Wednesdays (3/9 & 3/16) Saturdays (3/12 & 12/19) at 3pm

Talkbacks after Sunday matinées.

 

*These actors appear courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association.
Walk Hard
is an AEA Approved Showcase

AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee, Inc.)

The AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee, Inc.) is an organization that acknowledges and honors Black Theatre and its artists in New York City. Established and incorporated in 1973 by the late Vivian Robinson, to stimulate interest in and support of performing arts in black communities.

AUDELCO Recognition Awards – The annual Vivian Robinson/AUDELCO Recognition, “The VIV”Awards are the only formally established awards presented to the black theatre community.  Every third Monday in November the nominees are awarded in various categories.

 

 

 

2016 Nominees

LIGHTING DESIGN
Alan C. Edwards (Macbeth)
Nathan Hawkins/William Kenyon (Blood at the Root)
Tyler Micoleau (Familiar)
Austin R. Smith (The Royale)
Thom Weaver (The Total Bent)

SET DESIGN
Michael Carnahan (Skeleton Crew)
Maruti Evans (Dead and Breathing)
G.W. Mercier (Head of Passes)
Clint Ramos (Familiar)
Daniel Robinson (The First Noel)

COSTUME DESIGN
Dede M. Ayite (The Royale)
Gabriel Berry (The Total Bent)
Rachel Dozier-Ezell (Macbeth)
Susan Hilferty (Familiar)
Toni-Leslie James (Head of Passes)

SOUND DESIGN
Obadiah Eaves/Sten Severson (The Total Bent)
Rob Kaplowitz (Skeleton Crew)
John McKenna (Macbeth)
Liz Sokolak (Blood at the Root)
Darron L. West (Familiar)

DIRECTOR/DRAMATIC PRODUCTION
Carl Cofield (Macbeth)
Kenny Leon (Smart People)
Jonathan McCrory (Dead and Breathing)
Ruben Santiago-Hudson (Skeleton Crew)
Liesl Tommy (Eclipsed)

DIRECTOR/MUSICAL PRODUCTION
Steve H. Broadnax III (The First Noel)
Jeff Calhoun (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
Angie Kristic (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Joanna Settle (The Total Bent)

PLAYWRIGHT
Lydia Diamond (Smart People)
Colman Domingo (Dot)
Danai Gurira (Familiar)
Chisa Hutchinson (Dead and Breathing)
Dominique Morisseau (Skeleton Crew)
Marco Ramirez (The Royale)

SUPPORTING ACTOR
Francois Battiste (Head of Passes)
Jason Dirden (Skeleton Crew)
Michael Potts (Mother Courage and Her Children)
Larry Powell (The Christians)
David Roberts (The Fall of the Kings)
Kim Sullivan (The Piano Lesson)

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Ito Aghayere (Familiar)
Alana Arenas (Head of Passes)
Vinie Burrows (I Will Look Forward to This Later)
Montego Glover (The Royale)
Nikiya Mathis (Skeleton Crew)
Linda Powell (The Christians)
Myra Lucretia Taylor (Familiar)

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN A MUSICAL – FEMALE
Tina Fabrique (The First Noel)
Ashley Ware Jenkins (The First Noel)
Traci Michelle (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN A MUSICAL – MALE
Ato Blankson-Wood (The Total Bent)
Isaac Gay (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Vondie Curtis Hall (The Total Bent)
Maurice Hines (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
CB Murray (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Nathaniel Stampley (The First Noel)

CHOREOGRAPHY
Brian Harlan Brooks (The First Noel)
Maurice Hines (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
David Neumann (The Total Bent)
Tiffany Rea-Fisher (Macbeth)
Kyndra “Binkie” Reevey (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)

OUTSTANDING ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE
A Lovely Malfunction (Negro Ensemble Company)
Barbecue (The Public Theater)
but I cld only whisper (The Flea)
Dead and Breathing (National Black Theatre)
Eclipsed (The Public Theater)
Proof (Quick Silver Theatre/Classics in Color Theatre Co.)
Timeless: The Mystery of the Dark Water (Black Spectrum Theatre)

SOLO PERFORMANCE
Trezana Beverley (Mabel Madness)
Staceyann Chin (Motherstruck!)
Cherie Danielle (The Diary of An Afro Goddess)
Tommie J. Moore (Dare to Be Black: The Jack Johnson Story)
Khalil Muhammad (Pryor Truth)
Reginald L. Wilson (Sugar Ray)

LEAD ACTOR
Mahershala Ali (Smart People)
Khris Davis (The Royale)
RJ Foster (Richard III)
Wendell B. Franklin (Skeleton Crew)
Joe Morton (Turn Me Loose)
Jahi Kassa Taquara (The Piano Lesson)

LEAD ACTRESS
Lynda Gravatt (Skeleton Crew)
Marjorie Johnson (Dot)
Kecia Lewis (Mother Courage and Her Children)
Phylicia Rashad (Head of Passes)
Tessa Thompson (Smart People)
Tamara Tunie (Familiar)

BEST REVIVAL
In the Heights (Harlem Repertory Theatre)
In White America (New Federal Theatre)
Macbeth (Classical Theatre of Harlem)
Mother Courage and Her Children (Classic Stage Company)
Proof (Quick Silver Theatre/Classics in Color Theatre Co.)
The Piano Lesson (Gallery Players)
Walk Hard (Metropolitan Playhouse)

MUSICAL PRODUCTION OF THE YEAR
Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse (La Mama)
Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life (New World Stages)
The First Noel (Classical Theatre of Harlem)
The Total Bent (The Public Theater)

DRAMATIC PRODUCTION OF THE YEAR
Dead and Breathing (National Black Theatre)
Dot (Vineyard Theatre)
Familiar (Playwrights Horizons)
Skeleton Crew (Atlantic Theater Company)
Smart People (Second Stage Theatre).
The Royale (Lincoln Center Theater)

 

As a “Friend of AUDELCO,” you receive discounts to some of your favorite Off and Off-Off Broadway theatres when you attend theatre and dance productions.

AUDELCO, Inc. activities include:

Networking – Contacting and developing relationships with individuals, local groups, churches, and other organizations to introduce new audiences to non-profit performing arts.

AUDELCO Recognition Awards – The annual Vivian Robinson/AUDELCO Recognition, “The VIV”Awards are the only formally established awards presented to the black theatre community.  Every third Monday in November the nominees are awarded in various categories.

Theatre for the Future:Young Audiences Series – Addresses the need for positive cultural experiences for children between the ages of 10-17.  This series provides entertainment and cultural experience for the youth.  This series provides entertainment and cultural enrichment in non-academic settings such as: outdoor activities during Harlem Week; Saturday matinees during Black Arts Festival; Holiday celebrations in December, and performances during Black History Month.

Black Theatre Archives – A collection of books, tapes, original scripts, costumes and set designs, photographs, playbills and extensive clippings on current theatre groups and activities.

Publications-“INTERMISSION”, AUDELCO‘s newsletter is published quarterly to stimulate interest in the performing arts.  The “OVERTURE”, a black theatre magazine that is published to document exciting work done by Black theatre artists.

Seminars, Lectures, and Forums- Addresses the general awareness about the contributions of Blacks in the cultural and socio-economic environment.

November 18, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

#APAP2017 #OPERA/ THEATRE / NOW PROTOTYPE #NYC JANUARY 2017

PROTOTYPE is the premier festival of opera-theatre and music-theatre. January 5-15, 2017

After just four years on the scene, PROTOTYPE: Opera/Theatre/Now has been deemed “the go-to spot for brilliantly produced new indie chamber opera” by The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times called the 2016 festival an “explosion of boundary-defying chamber opera.”

Now blazing into its fifth season, PROTOTYPE returns January 5-15, 2017. Beth Morrison Projects and HERE have come together to bring you a striking celebration of opera and a stellar array of artists, presenting new works by Matt Marks & Paul Peers; Missy Mazzoli & Royce Vavrek; David Lang & Mark Dion; M Lamar & Hunter Hunt-Hendrix; Sahba Aminikia, Jeff Beal, Mary Kouyoumdjian, Shara Nova, Toshi Reagon, DJ Spooky, & Brooklyn Youth Chorus; Sarah Small; Cerise Jacobs & Julian Wachner – at HERE and our partner presenting venues – NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts, BRIC Arts | Media House, National Sawdust, and French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF).

Tickets for PROTOTYPE 2017 are now on sale.

November 9, 2016 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

ARTS – #APAP #NYC — January In NYC links 12 major performing arts festivals and conferencess around APAP|NYC 2017 1/3-22/17

45,000 Performing Arts Professionals and Enthusiasts Await the Most Comprehensive Celebration of the Performing Arts Around the Globe
 January 3-22

January In NYC links 12 major performing arts festivals and conferencess around APAP|NYC 2017

November 3, 2016– Every January in New York City, more than 45,000 industry professionals and enthusiasts come together to experience the most comprehensive celebration of the performing arts around the globe. This January 3-22, a dozen events organized by leading arts organizations will spotlight the best and newest in theater, dance, opera and music. With more than 1,500 world-class showcases and full-length performances, concerts and public programs, conferences, keynote speakers, professional development and networking opportunities, the partnership of public festivals and industry events, January In NYC demonstrates how rich, vibrant, vast and diverse the performing arts are.

 

“There is an electricity in the air the moment all of these performing arts professionals and festival-goers descend upon the streets, clubs, performance spaces and conference hotels of New York during the first few weeks of January,” said Mario Garcia Durham, president and CEO of the Association of Performing Arts Presenters (APAP).

 

EVENTS FOR 2017 include conferences, festivals and concerts—many open to the public. Details are available at JanuaryInNYC.org and individual event websites:

 

American Dance Platform, Jan. 3-8, Joyce.org

Performance Space 122’s COIL Festival, Jan. 3-22, ps122.org/coil

The Public Theater’s Under the Radar Festival (UTR), Jan. 4-15, undertheradarfestival.com

Jazz Connect Conference, Jan. 5-6, jazz-connect.com

Wavelengths: APAP World Music Preconference, Jan. 5-6, APAPNYC.org

NYC Winter Jazzfest, Jan. 5-10, winterjazzfest.com

American Realness, Jan. 5-15, americanrealness.com

PROTOTYPE: Opera/Theatre/Now, Jan. 5-15, prototypefestival.org

APAP|NYC 2017, Jan. 6-10 and Preconference, Jan 5-6, APAPNYC.org

globalFEST, Jan. 8, globalfest.org

ISPA’s 99th Congress, Jan. 10-12, ispa.org

Chamber Music America (CMA), Jan. 12-15, chamber-music.org

January In NYC grew organically as live arts festivals and professional events were scheduled around the annual Association of Performing Arts Presenters conference (APAP|NYC), which will celebrate 60 years in 2017. Organizers of events built onto the concentration of artists and presenters already traveling to New York. In January 2014, nine such organizations formed a deliberate collaboration to more effectively and efficiently serve the performing arts community. A dozen groups now comprise the partnership.

November 4, 2016 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Theatre/Performance/Grants – Cole Foundation 2016 Award Recipients

The Cole Foundation, the only private foundation in Montreal with an intercultural theatre program, announces this year’s winners including First Nations theatre companies, theatre for young audiences, and production, commissioning, and translations grants, to promote dialogue between diverse cultures on stage. New works this year explore the effects of radicalization, sex-selective abortion, racial profiling, feminist dialogue between Christians and Muslims, and little known circumpolar communities, among other topics. Full press release attached and below, including quotes from theatre companies.

 

Intercultural Conversations – Conversations interculturelles

Encouraging theatrical dialogue between the various cultures in Montreal

 

Twenty local companies awarded indispensable grants for their upcoming seasons

 

The Cole Foundation is pleased to announce the latest grant winners for the Intercultural Conversations-Conversations Interculturelles (IC-CI) program, established to encourage greater understanding of Montreal’s cultural mosaic by having audiences enjoy professional plays showing diverse cultures on stage and seeing their stories presented. Barry Cole, president and chairman of the Cole Foundation, explains: “Our belief is that these financial awards animate change of theatre practice to include intercultural conversation as part of mainstream theatrical society.” There are three types of intercultural dialogue considered: plays with more than one cultural community in dialogue; plays with only one cultural community- in this case the dialogue is with the audience; and plays that show the uniqueness of the French or English Quebec communities translated into the other language.

 

It’s heartening that intercultural dialogue is a hot topic. Of note is the ongoing ‘black face’ discussion sparked by Théâtre Rideau Vert, along with conferences on racism (Centre des Auteurs Dramatiques) and diversity (Conseil du theatre Québecois). Awareness and momentum continues with sizeable, established theatre companies submitting requests, including Centaur Theatre and Duceppe, promoting the cause on a considerable scale.  As well, there are ever-increasing numbers of new applicant companies and those that specialize in theatre for young audiences.

This year’s awarded companies

As theatre holds a mirror to society, the IC-CI granting program has reflected the varying cultural landscape over the years, marking our artistically sensitive evolution. New works this year explore the effects of radicalization, sex-selective abortion, racial profiling, feminist dialogue between Christians and Muslims, and little known circumpolar communities, among other topics. Lauded returning applicants strengthen the message: playwright Sarah Berthiaume continues to offer hard-hitting, poignant stories, Annabel Soutar addresses headlines we can’t ignore and Marcus Youssef engages and enlightens children. Cole is especially encouraged seeing requests from theatres for young audiences, “This kind of support has lasting benefits, impressing important values on children and offering productions that return to schools for multiple years.” He also appreciates following the arc of an important, intercultural piece, “The Foundation supported the commission of Porte Parole’s play about Fredy Villanueva and I’m looking forward to see the resulting production.”

 

COMMISSIONING grants include: Black Theatre WorkshopA Tale of Two Islands by Christine Rodrigues; Geordie ProductionsRadical by Marcus Youssef; Mise au JeuLa pour rester, collective creation; Teesri Duniya TheatreMissing Girl by Rahul Varma and Théâtre BluffAntioche by Sarah Berthiaume.

PRODUCTION grant awards go to: L’Acteur en MarcheKarma by Mohsen El Gharbi; Black Theatre Workshop- Angelique by Lorena Gale, and Bluenose by Emil Sher; Centaur TheatreYou Will Remember Me by François Archambault; DuceppeRace by David Mamet; Geordie ProductionsJabber by Marcus Youssef; Imago TheatreDonna by Stefano Massini (also translation grant); Mise au JeuFéministe et Croyante by Alice Pascual; Nouveau ThéâtreAi-je du sang de dictateur? by Didier Lucien; Porte ParoleFredy by Annabel Soutar; Productions MenuentakuanMuliats, collective creation; Productions OnishkaTsekan, collective creation; Talisman TheatreYukonstyle by Sarah Berthiaume; Théâtre de l’OpsisJ’appelle mes frères by Jonas Hassen Khemiri; Théâtre InclinéNordicité/Walking on the Circle by José Babin; Théâtre I.N.K.File d’attente by Marilyn Perreault (also commissioning grant); Théâtre La ChapelleThe Agokwe Collective by Waawaate Fobister; Théâtre MotusRêves by Izumi Ashizawa & Marco Collin (also commissioning grant) and Volte 21Les Électres des Amériques Les Phares de la Mémoire by Hanna Abd El Nour.

 

Wide range of theatre companies concur on the need for intercultural dialogue

Race- Duceppe, photo by Caroline Laberge 2

For Théâtre MotusMarie-France Bruyère, “This important contribution will enable us to achieve an intercultural project that would not have otherwise happened, involving artists from different origins as well as children from here and the Innu community of Mashteuiatsh.” For L’Acteur en Marche’s Mohsen El Gharbi, the Cole Foundation contribution is crucial, “This grant will serve as leverage to obtain the rest of the necessary funding. It shows that we have a common concern for dialogue regardless of our origins and the need to fight the demonization of ‘the other’. The Foundation has significantly strengthened Teesri Duniya Theatre’s mission, according to Artistic Director Rahul Varma, “There won’t be intercultural conversation if there isn’t intercultural creation. Here, support goes to the source–the playwright; we can now create original work that diversifies our literary field, enriches our cultural fabric and fosters critical understanding.” For Sarah Chouinard-Poirier from Volte 21, the grant program encourages other partners to invest in daring theatre as necessary for cultural enrichment within a healthy and egalitarian society, “By promoting diversity and providing a forum for artists from various disciplines, generations and cultural backgrounds, the Cole Foundation makes us believe that it is still possible to create art where we can put social issues at the forefront.” Geordie Productions’ Artistic Director Dean Fleming accomplished a successful American showcase of their award-winning Jabber as only one of twelve invited international companies. Fleming adds, “On top of this great news, we are excited to continue our ongoing relationship with playwright Marcus Youssef as he probes the world of an isolated teen’s obsession with a radical group.” The Haitian community is the subject of the next show at Nouveau Théâtre Expérimental according to GM Isabelle Gingras, “We continue our mandate to explore local cultural communities and ensuing healthy and inclusive discussion.” Michel Dumont, artistic director for Duceppe, was able to offer more than a hundred free tickets to youth from different cultural communities, “This is an opportunity to develop audiences; ensuring theatre remains a place of meeting and exchange.”  Joachim Tanguay from Théâtre Bluff welcomes the invaluable support of the Foundation to commission Sarah Berthiaume’s new text inspired by a Radio-Canada report on Cegep youth who joined the Syrian Jihad. “Here, the story of a Muslim woman and her disillusioned Quebec-born daughter explores with great sensitivity the real causes of indoctrination and perceptions of Western values.”

Cole by the numbers

 

The Cole Foundation is the only private foundation in Montreal with an intercultural theatre program, offering companies up to $25,000 for production grants with the aim to modify public opinion. There is no set limit on the number of companies who can receive funding. Recent grants, totalling a record $334,000 presented to the highest number of applicants since the program’s creation, went to theatre companies for their 2016-2018 seasons. For this year’s competition, the Foundation received 40 applications from 35 companies – 23 French and 12 English, an 11% increase compared to last year. These figures include 3 First Nations productions; 2 in French and 1 in English. Thirty-four applications were for production grants, 10 requests for commissioning money and 1 for translation. Since its inception, the Foundation has contributed to the costs of commissioning 34 plays, the translation of 32 plays, production costs of 90 plays, plus various workshops and outreach events. A panel of bilingual Montreal theatre professionals adjudicate the applications.

Cole Foundation, Barry Cole photo by Steve Gerrard 2

Grants for the next competition relate to shows starting March 1 for the 2017-18 and 2018-19 theatre seasons. The deadline for the next competition of the award is Sept. 30, 2016. Theatre companies interested in applying for a grant will be able to download the necessary application forms from the Cole Foundation’s web site at: www.colefoundation.ca/community/competition-forms

March 10, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

THEATER — The Lark — The New Black Fest at The Lark — March 14-19, 2016 *nyc

 new Black Fest at the Lark 2016
 The Larka 22-year-old play development lab dedicated to expanding the range of perspectives represented on stage in the United States, is proud to announce the continuation of its partnership with The New Black Fest, a theater organization celebrating provocative storytelling, film and discussion from the African Diaspora. The New Black Fest at The Larka week-long festival, will feature the following artists and their works: Actor and playwright Jocelyn Bioh (Schoolgirls; or The African Mean Girls Play) whose work has appeared on The Kilroy’s List; Co-founder of Team Play Eric Holmes (Pornplay; or Blessed Are the Meek); Poet, playwright and Ruby Prize Winner Lenelle Moïse (Merit); Actor, playwright and an alumnus of the Emerging Writers Group at the Public Theater NSangou Njikam (When We Left); and actor and playwright Lisa Rosetta Strum, whose one-person play She Gon’ Learn won a Best Solo Show Award at the United Solo Festival at Theatre Row last fall.

The partnership between The New Black Fast and The Lark is both organic and essential.  Both organizations are committed to creating community and movement around new work that contributes to the representation of a contemporary national vision. The Lark’s mission centers on the belief that targeted support for historically underrepresented playwrights is crucial to a culture of equity, access and inclusion, and a theatrical field that represents the vibrancy of our collective voices.

“As our country and theater community continue their fight for complexity and equity, I am beyond thrilled to continue our relationship with The Lark that believes the creative well-being of the playwright is central to everything,” said Keith Josef Adkins, Artistic Director and Co-founder of The New Black Fest.

Through a diverse portfolio of fellowships, residencies, and workshops, The Lark has provided a platform for voices to enter the evolving national repertoire.  Recent plays substantially developed at The Lark include Dominique Morisseau’s Skeleton Crew, Mona Mansour’s The Way West, Rajiv Joseph’s Guards at the Taj, and Katori Hall’s The Mountaintop.

“The current trend in which funds are systematically redirected from smaller, culturally explicit theater companies to larger, predominately white-led institutions, ostensibly for the sake of ‘efficiency,’ hampers diverse leadership in the arts and dampens voices and perspectives that are critical to a free society” said John Clinton Eisner, The Lark’s Artistic Director.  “Working with The New Black Fest is core to our mission of championing the next wave of innovative theater artists and leaders by putting them in the driver’s seat to leverage public awareness and financial resources.”

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and The New Black Fest’s advisory board member Lynn Nottage, who was The Lark’s 2013-14 Writer-in-Residence, told The New York Times, “This [event] is not about separation, it’s about inclusion. It’s about inviting people who don’t get access.”

Public readings of these new works and a kick-off panel, “The White Gaze, the Truth Gaze and a New Revolution,” will take place March 14 – March 19 at The Lark’s BareBones® Studio, located at 311 West 43rd Street, 5th Floor, in New York City.

The New Black Fest is supported in part by a special grant from the Ford Foundation.

Additional support provided through grants to The Lark from the New York State Council on the Arts, a State Agency, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Monday, March 14 @7pm
Kick Off Panel: THE WHITE GAZE, THE TRUTH GAZE AND A NEW REVOLUTION
This event will be followed by a reception.  Moderator and panelists to be announced.

Tuesday, March 15 @7pm
SHE GON’ LEARN
by Lisa Rosetta Strum

With old school wisdom, her childhood, a string of bad dates, and a one night stand gone wrong with a smooth talking would be ex-boyfriend, Lisa navigates her personal mishaps with poetry, comedy and poignancy on her journey to discover self-love.

Wednesday, March 16 @7pm
MERIT
by Lenelle Moïse 

Nestled in small-town Vermont, Merit follows Mona, the only student of color (and Southerner) in a prestigious MFA Fiction program. When she befriends distinguished professor Dr. Sive, they struggle to strike a balance between passion and professionalism, power and trust.

Thursday, March 17 @7pm
PORNPLAY; or BLESSED ARE THE MEEK
by Eric Holmes

Pornplay: or, Blessed Are the Meek is a dark, comedic plantation drama about how the legacy of slavery plays into our sexual desires and online-avatars. The story centers around the hiring of Austin, a Black veteran, by the mysterious porn mogul, Bob 3, to build a swimming pool for his renovated estate in Virginia. When Austin meets Bob 3’s pornstar wife, Sephie, and Jackie, her gender-fluid son, their lives, races and desires intersect to reveal the horrifying truths of sex, history, and power.

Friday, March 18 @7pm
SCHOOLGIRLS; or THE AFRICAN MEAN GIRLS PLAY
by Jocelyn Bioh

Inspired from actual events, School Girls is set at the prestigious Aburi Girls Boarding School and tells the story of Paulina, the most popular (mean) girl in school, and Ericka, the new girl with a unique background. Stakes run high as Paulina and Ericka face off in a battle of wits and beauty as they compete to be named Miss Ghana 1985.

Saturday, March 19 @7pm
WHEN WE LEFT
by NSangou Njikam

In the near-future, a secret organization puts out a call to Black Americans: leave America and return to Africa. This extraordinary call promises jobs, housing and a better way of life. But is it real? When We Left follows two members of Congress, two cousins in the inner city, a pair of Black advertising executives, and an interracial, lesbian Black Lives Matter couple as they tackle perhaps the most monumental issue they will ever face: is the American dream for Black people?

Talkbacks will follow each reading. A reception will follow the panel and the final reading on March 19.

All events are free and open to the public; reservations are required. Reservations can be made beginning Monday, February 22.

Visit www.larktheatre.org for more information.

THE NEW BLACK FEST PARTICIPANTS (2016)

Jocelyn Bioh has her B.A. in English and Theater from The Ohio State University and MFA in Theater-Playwriting from Columbia University School of the Arts. As a playwright, Jocelyn has been produced in New York City, Columbus, OH, Baton Rouge, LA and Washington D.C. Plays include: African Americans (Produced at Howard University 2015; Southern Rep Ruby Prize Award Finalist 2011; O’Neill Center Semi-Finalist, 2012), Nollywood Dreams (Kilroy’s List 2015) and her new play School Girls. Her musical The Ladykiller’s Love Story, for which she conceived the story and wrote the book with music/lyrics by Cee Lo Green, is currently in development with Hi-Arts NYC. As an actress, Jocelyn’s credits include: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Broadway; Tony Award Winner for Best Play, 2015), An Octoroon (Soho Rep, Obie Award Winner for Best Play, 2014), Booty Candy (Wilma Theater), Seed (Classical Theater of Harlem, Audelco Award Nominee), and Marcus; or The Secret of Sweet (City Theatre). She also originated the role of “Topsy” in the World Premiere of Neighbors (The Public Theater, Audelco Award Nominee). TV: The Characters (Netflix) Louie (FX) One Life to Live (ABC). Former Cover Girl spokesmodel (National commercial/Print ads).

Eric Micha Holmes is a playwright whose work has been seen and developed at Rattlestick Playwrights Theatre (World Without Names), New York Theatre Workshop (Nimpsey Pink) and The Lark (Red All Over) among others. Former residencies and fellowships include Space on Ryder Farm (The Stick Up) and LaGuardia Performing Arts Playwriting Lab (Falls For Jodie). His mono-play, Walking Next To Michael Brown: Confessions Of A Light-Skinned Half-Breed, was commissioned by The New Black Fest and has toured with “Hands Up: 6 Playwrights / 6 Testaments” to theaters across the country including: The National Black Theatre (Harlem, NY), Museum Of The Moving Image (NYC), The Hansberry Project (Seattle, WA) and Flashpoint Theatre (Philadelphia, PA). His monologue, “W.F.C.,” is published by The Good Ear Review. Holmes co-founded Team Play, a theater-for-young-adults education program at Primary Stages Theatre Company. Holmes is currently a third-year MFA Playwriting student at University of Iowa’s Playwrights Workshop.

Lenelle Moïse is a poet, playwright, and performance artist. She won the 2012 Southern Rep Ruby Prize for Merit, a black feminist comedy. She was a 2012-2014 Huntington Theatre Company Playwriting Fellow and the 2010-2011 Poet Laureate of Northampton, Massachusetts. She wrote, composed and co-starred in the critically acclaimed drama Expatriate. Her plays have been developed with the Culture Project, the Hansberry Project, Hedgebrook, the Jewish Plays Project, the Kitchen Theatre Company, Serious Play Theatre Ensemble, and New Rep, among others. She has also been an artist-in-residence at Clark University, Northwestern and UT Austin. Moïse is the author of Haiti Glass, a winner of the 2015 PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award. She is currently working on Where There Are Voices, a solo performance, fusing music, movement, video and poetry. http://www.lenellemoise.com

Lisa Rosetta Strum‘s She Gon’ Learn  performed to sold out audiences during the United Solo Festival at Theatre Row last fall and garnered one of the festival’s Best Solo Show Awards in New York City. The play had its inaugural showing with the Emerging Artist Theatre Festival at TADA! Theatre and was performed at The Kraine Theatre for the Obie Award Winning Fire This Time Festival and just recently at the National Black Theatre. Lisa has also performed at Lincoln Center Theatre, Summer Stage, Signature Theatre, New Federal Theatre, Intiman Theatre, The Obie Award Winning 48 Hours in…Harlem, ACT Seattle, and The Fifth Avenue Theatre. She has had a recurring role on Law & Order: SVU and co-stared in the television pilot Citizen Baines with James Cromwell. As an educational consultant, she has worked in numerous public schools throughout New York, conducted theater workshops for Teachers College at Columbia University, and has acted as the Theatre Specialist for the Abrons Arts Center, Barbara L. Tate Arts Camp for the past nine seasons. Lisa is an MFA graduate of the University of Washington Professional Actor Training Program.

NSangou Njikam is an actor and playwright originally from Baltimore, MD.  He is the author of Syncing Ink, Re:Definition, I.D., When We Left, Search For The Crystal Stairs, and one of the authors of “Hands Up: 6 Plays, 6 Testimonials.”  His work has been developed by The Public Theater, Penn State University, The Flea Theater, Hip Hop Theatre Festival, UNIVERSES theatre company, The New Black Fest, and the Alley Theater.  Mr. Njikam’s play I.D. recently made its world premiere at the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown, South Africa before coming to the U.S. at Penn State Centre Stage.  His playwriting residencies and fellowships include 2015 Emerging Writers Group at the Public Theater, 2013 New Black Fest fellow, and Penn State University commissioned playwright.  Currently, Mr. Njikam’s play, Syncing Ink, will go to the Alley Theater’s All New Festival, directed by Niegel Smith.   As an arts educator, Mr. Njikam has worked for Brooklyn Academy of Music, CUNY Creative Arts Team, Harlem School of the Arts, and is co-founder of The Continuum Project, Inc., an organization using African Ancestry DNA testing and the Arts to promote healing and empowerment for communities.  Mr. Njikam’s work focuses mainly on identity stories and the empowerment of the human spirit by recognizing and embracing one’s personal gifts, utilizing Hip Hop theater, poetry, and West African performance aesthetics.  He also aims to develop new, diverse and younger audiences by creating “theater of the now and for tomorrow.” He received his BFA in acting from Howard University.  After tracing his roots to the Tikar people in Cameroon, West Africa, he was named NSangou by Sultan Ibrahim MBombo Njoya, 19th king of the Bamoun kingdom in Cameroon.  He currently resides in New York.

The Lark is an international theater laboratory, based in New York City, dedicated to empowering playwrights by providing transformative support within a global community. Founded in 1994, The Lark provides writers with funding, space, collaborators, audiences, professional connections, and the freedom to design their own processes of exploration. The guiding principle of The Lark’s work is the belief that playwrights are society’s truth tellers, and their work strengthens our collective capacity to understand our world and imagine its future.

Last year, The Lark served 907 artists, including 138 playwrights, partnered with over three dozen theaters and universtieis, and welcomed 3,000 audience members to 40 public presentations.  in the past three years 169 Lark developed plays moved on to 289 productions in more than a dozen countries around the world.In order to provide economic flexibility to writers at different stages of their careers, The Lark has created a portfolio of major playwriting fellowships.  The Lark continues to offer a free and open submission process that allows any and all writers to submit to our Playwrights’ Week program and maintains free admission to the public for all readings & workshops.

Plays substantially developed at The Lark include The Mountaintop by Katori Hall, Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo by Rajiv Joseph, brownsville song (b-side for tray) by Kimber Lee, and Detroit ’67 by Dominique Morisseau.

www.larktheatre.org

The New Black Fest is a theater organization committed to celebrating insurgent voices within the diverse African Diaspora through theater, film and discussion. The New Black Fest is a gathering of artists, thinkers, activists and audiences who are dedicated to stretching, interrogating and uplifting the Black aesthetic in the 21st century. The New Black Fest has developed many artists including Mfoniso Udofia, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Dennis Allen II, Eisa Davis and more. It has partnered with the National Black Theatre, 651 ARTS, the BRIC Arts/Media/Brooklyn, the Classical Theatre of Harlem and more. It also co-founded the American Slavery Project as well as commissioned Facing Our Truth: 10-Minute Plays on Trayvon, Race and Privilege, HANDS UP: 7 Playwrights, 7 Testaments, and the recent Un-Tamed: Hair Body Attitude – Short Plays by Black Women (in collaboration with Dominique Morisseau).

Keith Josef Adkins (Artistic Director) As a playwright, his plays include The People Before the Park (Premiere Stages), Pitbulls (Rattlestick),Safe House (Cincinnati Playhouse, Repertory Theatre of St. Louis)
among others. His play The Last Saint on Sugar Hill received its New York City premiere in 2013 at Dr. Barbara Ann Teer’s National Black Theater in NYC under the direction of Seret Scott and earned six 2014 Audelco nominations. Other plays include The Migrant’s Fight, Sugar and Needles, The Final Daze, among others.  He is currently under commission by Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park.

February 18, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Performance/ART — HANDS UP/NEW BLACK FEST –2/6/16 Bklyn Museum #FREE

THE NEW BLACK FEST 
is thrilled to announce
 
HANDS UP: 7 Playwrights, 7 Testaments
(with a new monologue by playwright Nambi Kelley)
directed by Kamilah Forbes
 
February 6 @ 6pm
 

 
First come, first seated. Free admission to event and museum. 
Hope to see you there!!!
———————-
 
SAVE THE DATES
March 23 – 27, 2016
 
UnTamed: Hair Body Attitude – Short Plays by Black Women
National Black Theatre, NYC
Directed by Elizabeth Van Dyke and Kaia Calhoun
 
————————-
 
ALSO….
 

January 6 – February 14, 2016
 
World Premiere
SKELETON CREW
by DOMINIQUE MORISSEAU
directed by RUBEN SANTIAGO-HUDSON
Atlantic Stage 2 at 330 W 16th St.
In Dominique Morisseau’s third play in her Detroit trilogy, a makeshift family of workers at the last exporting auto plant in the city navigate the possibility of foreclosure. Power dynamics shift, and they are pushed to the limits of survival. When the line between blue collar and white collar gets blurred, how far over the lines are they willing to step?


Click HERE for more details and tickets!


ALSO….


January 21 – February 13, 2016


Abasiama came to America with high hopes-for her arranged marriage and for her future-intent on earning a degree and returning to Nigeria.  But when her husband is seduced by America, she must choose between the Nigerian and the American dream.

January 16, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Performance / Theater — AMERICAN REALNESS Festival Returns! #APAP- Jan 6-17, 2016

American Realness returns to Abrons Arts Center January 7-17, 2016 for its seventh consecutive season! The festival utilizes all three theater and gallery spaces at Abrons and includes off-site engagements presented by Sunday Sessions at MoMA PS1, and Gibney Dance Center to construct a composition of dance, theater, music theater, performance and hybrid performative works featuring two world premieres, six U.S. premieres, three New York premieres, six encore engagements. TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

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Culture Administration & Trembling

Jennifer Lacey / Antonija Livingstone / Dominique Pétrin / Stephen Thompson

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dead, disappears

Heather Kravas

Ligia Lewis „Sorrow Swag“
Sorrow Swag

Ligia Lewis

JaamilKosoko_#negrophobia-byScottShaw-37
#negrophobia

Jaamil Olawale Kosoko

keyon gaskin_its not a thing_photo by Robert Duncan Gray
its not a thing

keyon gaskin

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AL13FB<3

Fernando Belfiore

Jillian_Pena_PS122_by_Maria Baranova-1974
Panopticon

Jillian Peña

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future friend/ships

Keith Hennessy & Jassem Hindi

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Star Crap Method

Larissa Velez-Jackson

SaraSheltonMann_RobbieSweeny_HorizontalCrop copy
Sara (the smuggler)

Sara Shelton Mann, Keith Hennessy & Norman Rutherford

Yvonne Meier for American Realness Festival
Durch Nacht und Nebel

Yvonne Meier

AntonioRamos_Mira El_Alvaro González D
MIRA EL!

Antonio Ramos and the Gang Bangers

Milka_MASS_PROMOWahlanderGriffith
MASS

Milka Djordjevich & Chris Peck

Hi Res Photo by Serena Jara
DESTRUCTION

M. Lamar

Erin Markey & Becca Blackwell - A Ride On The English Cream
A Ride on the Irish Cream

Erin Markey

JackFerver_byIanDouglas_A
Mon, Ma, Mes (Revisité)

Jack Ferver

1. 69_positions_credit_Virginie Mira
69 Positions

Mette Ingvartsen

JonathanCapdevielle_ADISHATZ_057_ALAIN_MONOT
Adishatz/Adieu

Jonathan Capdevielle

Roulette_BFC- COMPILATION_Final
Score for a Lecture

The Bureau for the Future of Choreography

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Over the River | Through the Woods

James & Jen | McGinn & Again

January 6, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, LIFESTYLES, Music, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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