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We Recommend AFROPUNK The Takeover- Harlem Co-Produced by Harlem Stage February 21- 25, 2017

AFROPUNK

The Takeover- Harlem

Co-Produced by Harlem Stage

February 21- 25, 2017

Co-Produced by Harlem Stage, The Apollo Theater and a host of legendary Harlem venues, AFROPUNK commemorates Black History Month by celebrating African-American culture and engaging with contemporary thought and issues, in the New York neighborhood that’s been central to the black American experience for well over a century. AFROPUNK The Takeover – Harlem will present a week-long series of events featuring live musical performances, film screenings, comedy shows, jam sessions and frank discussions on identity, art and protest.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2017

NATIONAL BLACK THEATRE

BLACK JOY AS AN EXPRESSION OF RESISTANCE AND LIBERATION

OPENING PANEL DISCUSSION

7:00PM, FREE (Suggested donation $10)

2031 5th Ave, New York, NY 10035

RSVP NOW

The kickoff event of  AFROPUNK The Takeover – Harlem confronts this historic political moment with a conversation about the diverse expression and cultural significance of Black Joy!  With stereotypical images and tropes of “Blackness” inundating today’s media, it is imperative to explore the creative resistance, expression and liberation housed in our joy — on our own terms, in our own words. This panel discussion will explore the ways our various institutions and movements continue to tell our stories and introduce counter-narratives that genuinely celebrate who we are as a people. It will shine a light on  the tools that have helped heal, activate and keep the cultural expressions of our communities unapologetic and liberated.

Participating in the panel will be

Zoe Kravitz, actress/musician

Larry Ossei-Mensah, co-founder of ARTNOIR

Sade Lythcott, CEO of National Black Theatre

Matthew Morgan, Founder of AFROPUNK

Moderated by André D. Singleton, Co-Founder of The Very Black Project

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2017

HARLEM STAGE

TAMAR-KALI: DEMON FRUIT BLUES – A WORK-IN-PROGRESS SHOWING

7:30PM, $15

150 Convent Avenue, New York, NY 10031

Purchase Tickets Now

Connecting the dots between modern day rock, gospel, blues and original African rhythms, Tamar-Kali’s Demon Fruit Blues is a multidisciplinary work that explores and deconstructs interrogates gender binaries, patriarchy and womanhood by examining the origins of misogyny. Through the use of music and movement by Ase Dance Theatre CollectiveDemon Fruit Blues interrogates the ‘curse of womanhood’ in Judeo-Christian ideology and how this perception of the female body reverberates in modern day western society, in an effort to heal a culture of “unspoken” influences that psychically severs the ties between history and culture. This work-in-progress showing will be preceded by the screening of a short film and followed by a panel discussion with the Tamar-kaliAdia Whitaker,  Ashley Brockington, Feminista Jones and more.

 

THE SHED: OPEN JAM SESSION – AFROPUNK EDITION

GIN FIZZ HARLEM

9pm-12am, FREE

Reserve your ticket now

Ranked as one of New York City’s “Top 5 Jam Sessions,” #TheShed is a bi-weekly gathering that takes place at Gin Fizz Harlem. It is the brainchild of Grammy-nominated producer/engineer, AnuSun, and provides a taste of the New Renaissance happening in Harlem, and a launch-pad for emerging musical talent. Join us for the special AFROPUNK Edition of The Shed, you never know who might come through!

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2017

BEARING WITNESS AS PROTEST

THE STUDIO MUSEUM IN HARLEM

6PM-8:30PM, $7 GA/ $3 Students

144 West 125th Street, New York, New York

Purchase tickets now

Explore current and historical expressions of dissent in contemporary art at The Window and The Breaking of the Window and Circa 1970, two current exhibitions at The Studio Museum. The evening will begin with a guided walk-through the exhibitions, followed by a public dialogue on bearing witness as an act of protest, and on the actions needed to create the path ahead.

The discussion will be a public dialogue about bearing witness as an act of protest with members of Harlem CopwatchOasa DuVerney (Featured artist in The Window and the Breaking of the Window) and moderated by Chaédria LaBouvier (creator of Basquiat’s Defacement).

AFROPUNK & JILL NEWMAN PRODUCTIONS present A Night Of Comedy Featuring Gina Yashere Doors: 9:00PM; Show: 9:30PM, $20 ADV/$25 DOS GINNY’S SUPPER CLUB at Red Rooster  310 Lenox Avenue, New York, NY 10027 Purchase Tickets Now

AFROPUNK and Jill Newman Productions are collaborating to present – AFROPUNK Comedy featuring Nigerian-UK comic Gina Yashere. Gina Yashere is a stand up Comedian and TV star from the UK that broke onto the American scene in NBC’s Last Comic Standing. She has appeared on Def Comedy Jam. The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, The Nightly Show on Comedy Central and in her 1 hour Stand Up Special on Showtime, Skinny B*tch.  Kevin Avery is a comedian and Emmy award-winning writer. His writing credits include HBO’s Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, VH1′s Best Week Ever and the critically acclaimed FX original series, Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell, on which he had the distinction of serving as head writer.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2017

AFROPUNK  & THE CINEMA AT THE MAYSLES DOCUMENTARY CENTER present a screening of

THE TALK – RACE IN AMERICA

6:30PM; $10 Donation

THE CINEMA AT MAYSLES DOCUMENTARY CENTER

343 Lenox Avenue, New York, NY, 10027

Reserve Tickets Now

The Talk – Race in America – a documentary about the increasingly common conversation taking place in homes and communities across the country between parents of color and their children, about how to behave if they are ever stopped by the police. The film profiles, Dr. Christi GriffinSamaria Rice, mother of Tamir Rice, who was a 12-year-old boy killed by the Cleveland police while playing with a toy gun in a local park;Eric Adams, Brooklyn Borough President and retired New York police officer, Kenya Barris, creator/executive producer of Peabody Award-winning ABC series black-ishNas, musician/activist, John Singleton, director/screenwriter/producer; and Charles Blow, New York Times Op-Ed columnist.

MAD FREE & AFROPUNK present The Hair Tales:  An Appropriation Conversation

Harlem Stage

7:30pm; $15

150 Convent Avenue, New York, NY 10031

Purchase Tickets Now

Cultural critic and image activist Michaela Angela Davis teams up with Franchesca Ramsey, actress/comedian/provocateur and creator of the YouTube sensation Shit White Girls Say to Black Girls, to engage in a candid and kinky communal conversation about Black Girl hair culture in the age of  #BlackGirlMagic & #BlackLivesMatter. Designed as a Pan-African Parisian Salon, the evening will feature improvisational braiding by Ancestral Strands, exclusive set pieces by Enitan Vintage, cocktails and YOU.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2017

THE APOLLO THEATER

AFROPUNK: “UNAPOLOGETICALLY BLACK” THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN SONGBOOK REMIXED, A CELEBRATION OF BLACK PROTEST MUSIC

7:30PM, Tickets start at $33.50

253 W 125th St, New York, NY 10027

Purchase Tickets Now

Creative & Musical Direction by Robert Glasper

With Igmar Thomas & The Revive Big Band

Featuring Special Guests

Bilal,  Toshi Reagon, Staceyann Chin, Jill Scott, Tunde Adebimpe (TV ON THE RADIO) and more

AFROPUNK pays homage to black protest music and iconic and contemporary artists who have celebrated the power of being unapologetically black.

February 21, 2017 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, FOOD AND WINE, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

COMICS! GRAPHIC NOVELS! COSPLAY! GAMES! Exhibition- Museums- Skin And Bones Comic Con — 6/18-21/15 *Studio Museum in Harlem

The Studio Museum Presents

Skin and Bones Comic Con

Jun 18, 2015Jun 21, 2015 6:00 PM
The Studio Museum in Harlem
  • Trenton Doyle Hancock Cave Scape #2, 2010Ink on paper6 1/4 × 10 in.Courtesy the artist, James Cohan Gallery, New York and Hales Gallery, London

Inspired by Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing and building upon the Comic-Con platform for creating awareness of comic culture, Skin and Bones Comic Con is a weekend-long festival of happenings, talks and workshops that celebrate the dynamic contribution of comics to contemporary black art and culture.

Spanning four days, visitors are invited to participate in a range of programs that celebrate Hancock’s vast array of influences, including cartoons, comics, gaming, graphic novels and film. Facilitated by a diverse roster of teaching artists, scholars, writers and educators working within the field of comics, Skin and Bones Comic Con seeks to expose audiences to diverse approaches to visual storytelling, and contextualize comics as a powerful tool of social commentary and cultural critique.

The Museum’s theater will be transformed into a listening station and screening room where we will broadcast a curated selection of media inspired by nerd culture, ranging from podcast episodes to feature-length documentaries. There will also be daily exhibition tours throughout the weekend to help contextualize the festival within Hancock’s evolution as an artist, beginning with his early childhood drawings and the comic strip he developed for his college newspaper, and followed by a more in-depth investigation of his evolving use of line, color and humor.

Event Line-up:

Thursday, June 18, 6–9pm
Bring Your Own Beamer Projection Party & Courtyard Chalk-Up!

Friday, June 19, 1pm and 6pm
Tours of Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing

Saturday, June 20 – Sunday, June 21, 12–6pm
Skin and Bones Indie Book Fair

Skin and Bones Indie Book Fair

Jun 20, 2015Jun 21, 2015 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Galleries and Courtyard

1 of 2

  • Sadie BarnetteChanel, 2012Edition of 100Courtesy the artist

Inspired by Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing and building upon the Comic-Con platform for creating awareness of comic culture, Skin and Bones Comic Con is a weekend-long festival of happenings, talks and workshops that celebrate the dynamic contribution of comics to contemporary black art and culture.

Presented in collaboration with 8 Ball Zines, our courtyard will be transformed into a small and independent press book fair, featuring stands by both emerging and established zine makers, self-publishers, graphic novelists and comic book authors. There will also be a drop-off table, providing the opportunity for the public to bring and discuss their own print creations. Come soak up the sun, talk independent publishing with our very own artist in residence, Sadie Barnette, and grab some limited edition copies of your favorite zines, including BDGRMMR, Vulgar Colors, 3 Dot ZineDesert Island, Retard Riot, Leah Wishnia, Wellington Su, Killer Acid, Yeah Dude Comics, GatosaurioWomen in Comics NYC Collective International, True Laurels and more!

This book fair celebrates the unique process and culture behind transforming ideas into visual narratives, and our hope is to include all backgrounds, ages and skill levels in these important and ongoing conversations that nurture self-expression. We are also proud to present a teen arts collective exchange, where our own ETW students join forces with students from jumpstART, CUE Art Foundation’s joint program with the Joan Mitchell Foundation, to discuss their works in progress. There will also be a screen printing workshop on both days led by BeLcHez with Ray Martinez.

– See more at: http://www.studiomuseum.org/event-calendar/event/skin-and-bones-indie-book-fair-2015-06-20#sthash.keY4FHMK.dpuf

Saturday, June 20, 1–3pm
Studio Squared: Beta Gaming Workshop

Studio Squared

Beta Gaming Workshop

Jun 20, 2015 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Galleries and Theatre
  • Trenton Doyle Hancock Bone Throne, 2006Ink and acrylic on paper9 × 5 in.

    Courtesy the artist, James Cohan Gallery, New York and Hales Gallery, London Photo: Paul Hester

Inspired by Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing and building upon the Comic-Con platform for creating awareness of comic culture, Skin and Bones Comic Con is a weekend-long festival of happenings, talks and workshops that celebrate the dynamic contribution of comics to contemporary black art and culture.

The Studio Museum is excited to partner with Hidden Level Games, the New York-based game design studio that developed Beta, a 2D platform game that empowers players to straddle the line between player and developer. Utilizing a unique “tweet-sized” programming language called CodePOP, Beta was created for anyone to use with or without previous programming or design experience. In this interactive workshop, HLG’s creators will share experiences of coming to game design from non-traditional backgrounds, and how technology allows them to create new spaces to explore and complicate difference in playful and impactful ways.

Hidden Level Games has hosted game design workshops with schools, organizations and businesses across the US and internationally. Their work to increase the number of women and people of color in technology and game design has led to collaborations with organizations including the National Society of Black Engineers, HIVE NYC, Reboot Stories and Black Girls Code. This workshop is appropriate for ages 10 and up.

– See more at: http://www.studiomuseum.org/event-calendar/event/studio-squared-2015-06-20#sthash.KLFC8ZoK.dpuf

Saturday, June 20, 3–9pm
Cosplay Day
Studio Squared: Cosplay 101 Workshop, 3–5pm
Cosplay Contest, 5–7pm
Group Cosplay Performances & Party, 7–9pm

Cosplay Day

Jun 20, 2015 3:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Galleries, Theatre and Courtyard
  • Trenton Doyle HancockTorpedoboy Fights Aliens, 1984Graphite on notebook paper7 3/4 × 10 1/2 in.

    Courtesy the artist

Inspired by Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing and building upon the Comic-Con platform for creating awareness of comic culture, Skin and Bones Comic Con is a weekend-long festival of happenings, talks and workshops that celebrate the dynamic contribution of comics to contemporary black art and culture.

No stranger to a comic convention, cosplay is a performance art where cosplayers adorn themselves with elaborate, often self-made costumes and accessories that facilitate the embodiment of a persona with whom they identify. Cosplayers also often interact with one another through imaginative group performances, in which they create and inhabit rich, fantastical worlds as a collective.

Studio Squared: Cosplay 101 Workshop, 3–5pm
Visitors are invited to learn the basics of costumed role-play during a Cosplay 101 Workshop, where Cosplayers Black Krystel and Alissa Simmons from the cosplay group Shoeless will present costume creations and instruct participants on designing their own costumes and personae. In this introductory course, we will focus on ripening the imagination, discussing the difference between costuming and cosplay, and provide participants with resources on how and where to piece together their own designs that they will work on and share as a group.

Click here to RSVP for Studio Squared: Cosplay 101 Workshop. Skin and Bones Comic Con is free with Museum admission Thursday, June 18–Saturday, June 20, which is a suggested donation of $7 for adults and $3 for students and seniors.

 

Cosplay Contest, 5–7pm
Come join us in the courtyard for a cosplay contest! This contest—produced by Ian L. Freeman, Gaming, Pop Culture & Tech Correspondent at The Urban Daily, Evolve Entertainment, Stuff Fly People Like and Giant—will be judged by Ashle Danger, Senior Writer at Cosplay Culture Magazine, Wilmarie Sena from Bad Girls Club and Orange is the New Black, Jamila Rowser from Girl Gone Geek, and Cosplayer Black Krystel. Click here to apply for entry by June 17.

 

Group Cosplay Performances & Party, 7–9pm
Visitors are invited to participate in group cosplay performances and a reception in our courtyard!

– See more at: http://www.studiomuseum.org/event-calendar/event/cosplay-day-2015-06-20#sthash.QmvL2ty7.dpuf

Sunday, June 21, 12–2pm
Studio Squared: The Art of the Graphic Novel

Studio Squared

The Art of the Graphic Novel

Jun 21, 2015 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Galleries and Workshop B
  • Courtesy Jennifer Yvette Cruté

Inspired by Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing and building upon the Comic-Con platform for creating awareness of comic culture, Skin and Bones Comic Con is a weekend-long festival of happenings, talks and workshops that celebrate the dynamic contribution of comics to contemporary black art and culture.

Studio Squared is a series of informal art-making workshops aimed at making a wide range of studio practices accessible to adult audiences. Each workshop focuses on a particular theme and creative process inspired by our exhibitions, and explores methods of creative production through an experiential approach. This two-part session invites workshop participants to experiment with techniques and methods that are foundational to Trenton Doyle Hancock’s practice through hands-on tutorials.

Come join illustrator, painter and graphic novelist Jennifer Yvette Cruté and learn to storyboard and illustrate your own graphic novel! After a presentation on her dynamic practice—including her influences growing up and experience in commercial illustration—Cruté will provide an overview of the basics of producing visual narratives, and elaborate upon the power of the graphic novel as a tool of activism and self-expression. Materials will be provided; however, participants may also bring an iPad or laptop with drawing programs.

– See more at: http://www.studiomuseum.org/event-calendar/event/studio-squared-2015-06-21#sthash.0xYjjhbX.dpuf

Sunday, June 21, 2–4pm
Studio Squared: Animation Basics

Sunday, June 21, 4–6pm
In Conversation: Barbara Brandon-Croft, Tara Nakashima Donahue, Regine Sawyer and Juliana “Jewels” Smith

In Conversation

Barbara Brandon-Croft, Tara Nakashima Donahue, Regine Sawyer and Juliana “Jewels” Smith

Jun 21, 2015 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Theatre
  • Courtesy Juliana “Jewels” Smith

Inspired by Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing and building upon the Comic-Con platform for creating awareness of comic culture, Skin and Bones Comic Con is a weekend-long festival of happenings, talks and workshops that celebrate the dynamic contribution of comics to contemporary black art and culture.

Bringing together innovators and seminal voices in the field of comics, this panel seeks to discuss and contextualize comics as sites of activism, black ownership and agency. Four representatives from the Women In Comics NYC Collective International will present the important work they have done in confronting and combating marginalization within the field, and expose the power of comics to rewrite women and people of color as heroes, leaders and agents of social change. Together, and with the participation of the audience, the panel will explore the particularity of black characters and develop a new vocabulary for owning authentic representation within the field.

The Women In Comics NYC Collective International is an artistic and informative initiative that began in May of 2012, which serves to educate communities about the role and merit of women working in the comic book industry, and highlight their artistic endeavors. Cartoonist Barbara Brandon-Croft became the first African-American female to have a nationally syndicated comic strip in the main stream press. The daughter of Brumsic Brandon Jr.—creator of the 1960s comic strip Luther—she launched her own comic strip, Where I’m Coming From, in the Detroit Free Press which ran in newspapers until 2005. Tara Nakashima Donahue is gallery manager at Medialia Gallery, where she established the annual From Panel to Panel exhibition series in 2008 which actively promotes that art of comics. Regine L. Sawyer is owner and writer of Lockett Down Productions Publications, a company established in 2007 that specializes in cutting edge, Sci-Fi comics. She is also the Founder and Coordinator of Women in Comics NYC Collective International. Juliana “Jewels” Smith is a cultural worker, educator, writer and organizer. As an educator in community colleges, Smith created (H)afrocentric as a way to challenge students and readers alike about the presumptions around race, class, gender and sexuality through character dialogue. Her practice focuses on the links between racial justice, gender equity and political literacy, using creativity to facilitate dialogue.

Thanks to the generous support of Target, Museum admission and public programs are free and open to the public on Sunday, June 21. Click here to RSVP for In Conversation: Barbara Brandon-Croft, Tara Nakashima Donahue, Regine Sawyer and Juliana “Jewels” Smith. All seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

– See more at: http://www.studiomuseum.org/event-calendar/event/in-conversation-2015-06-21#sthash.VsShw00I.dpuf

Festival and Museum Admission Info:

Skin and Bones Comic Con is free with Museum admission from Thursday, June 18 to Saturday, June 20, which is a suggested donation of $7 for adults and $3 for students and seniors. Thanks to the generous support of Target, Museum admission and public programs are free and open to the public on Sunday, June 21. For inquiries, please send us an email.

We are pleased to offer a Skin and Bones Comic Con weekend-long pass* in the form of an exclusive button featuring a design by Trenton Doyle Hancock! Purchase a $10 pass for unlimited festival and museum entry all weekend long, and all pass holders will be entered to win a Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing exhibition catalogue! Buttons can be purchased at the reception desk beginning June 17th.

*Please note that the weekend pass does not secure admission to individual programs. RSVP to programs@studiomuseum.org to pre-register and be sure to arrive early to all workshops and talks to secure your place as seating is first-come, first served.

Special thanks to:

       

          

          

 

– See more at: http://www.studiomuseum.org/event-calendar/event/the-studio-museum-presents-2015-06-18#sthash.RmBAo2Dq.dpuf

June 19, 2015 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, TECHNOLOGY, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

FREE ADMISSION 3/27/14 5pm-9pm *Studio Museum In Harlem– When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South

You Must visit and support this tiny jewel of a museum as it mounts these adventurous exhibitions.

The Studio Museum Announces Spring 2014 Exhibitions and Projects
NEW YORK, NY,
This spring, The Studio Museum in Harlem debuts a slate of
exhibitions and projects that challenge the boundaries of contemporary art practice and exhibition.
Featuring more than fifty artists, championing collaboration and encompassing meditations on
geography, history, fashion, sports and more, this season’s exhibitions promise to engage and
inspire diverse audiences.
Spring 2014 exhibitions and projects open March 27!
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This Thursday, The Studio Museum in Harlem opens a slate of new exhibitions and projects featuring more than fifty artists, championing collaboration and encompassing meditations on geography, history, fashion, sports and more.When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South queries the category of “outsider” art in relation to contemporary art and black life. The exhibition includes thirty-five American artists—ranging from Minnie Evans (1892–1987) to current Studio Museum artist in residence Kevin Beasley (b. 1986)—who share an interest in the U.S. South as a location both real and imagined.Glenn Kaino: 19.83 takes its title from runner Tommie Smith’s gold medal–winning time in the men’s 200-meter race at the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City, and features recent works that are part of an ongoing collaboration between Kaino and Smith.Draped Down highlights the ways in which feminine beauty is constructed, traced and interpreted in painting and photography from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection. For the spring 2014 installment of Harlem Postcards, Ivan Forde, Laura Linda Miller, Paul Mpagi Sepuya and Cauleen Smith share their reflections on Harlem.

To celebrate the opening of these exhibitions, admission will be free and open to all on Thursday, March 27, from 5 to 9 pm.

When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South
looks at the influence
of self-taught artists on defining what black art can be, as well as the cultural significance of the
American South as a geographic location and a conceptual frame. Including work by thirty-five
artists who challenge the boundaries between self-taught, academically trained, religiously inspired
and secular categorizations,
When the Stars begin to Fall
brings together work often displayed and
considered separately.
The exhibition

Glenn Kaino: 19.83
takes its title from runner Tommie Smith’s gold medal–winning time in the men’s 200-meter race at the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City.
The show features two major recent works that are part of an ongoing collaboration between Kaino and Smith. This project mines the impact of Smith’s iconic protest during that medal ceremony in 1968 and, more broadly, the process through which a powerful historical moment becomes a symbol etched as a shared collective memory.
Draped Down, the latest in the Studio Museum’s ongoing series of focused presentations of work from the permanent collection, explores the ways in which feminine beauty is constructed and interpreted.
For the spring 2014 installment of Harlem Postcards,
Ivan Forde, Laura Linda Miller, Paul Mpagi Sepuya and Cauleen Smith participate in one of the Museum’s signature projects, which invites contemporary artists of diverse backgrounds to share their reflections on Harlem.
Also on view is Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series,
which presents an intimate look at an ongoing series that the celebrated artist began in 2006.
When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South
When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South queries the category of “outsider”
art in relation to contemporary art and black life. The exhibition includes thirty-five intergenerational
American artists—ranging from Minnie Evans (1892–1987) to current Studio Museum artist in residence Kevin Beasley (b. 1986)—who share an interest in the U.S. South as a location both real and imagined. Situating itself within current art historical and political debates,
When the Stars Begin to Fall considers work by self-taught, spiritually inspired and incarcerated artists, many of whom are showing at the Studio Museum for the first time, as well as by some of the best-known artists of African descent working today. Inserting a gutbucket-funky aesthetic into classical, sometimes overwrought, tropes of African Americana—the folk, the downhome, the hailed— When the Stars Begin to Fall presents narratives of racial authenticity alongside forms of abstraction, embracing the role of experimentation in an ongoing discourse about black aesthetics.
Working in diverse media including painting, drawing, sculpture, assemblage, performance and social practice, the artists in the exhibition all make insistent reference to place. Many share a graphic sensibility, an interest in creation myths, a fascination with the archive and a commitment to the use of found materials and detritus. With the majority of work in the exhibition made between 1964 and 2014,
When the Stars Begin to Fall looks at the history of self-taught artists in influencing and defining what black art can be, as well as the significance of regional culture across time and space. Bringing together work that cites and plays with ideas of origin, the exhibition considers how
identification and belonging—national and racial, artistic and institutional—shape our experience of art and meaning.
Artists in the exhibition
Benny Andrews
(1930–2006), Born Plainview, Georgia; Lived and worked in Brooklyn, New York
Kevin Beasley
(b. 1986), Born Lynchburg, Virginia; Lives and works in New York, New York
McArthur Binion
(b. 1946), Born Macon, Mississippi; Lives and works in Chicago, Illinois
Beverly Buchanan
(b. 1940), Born Fuquay-Varina, North Carolina; Lives and works in Ann Arbor, Michigan
Henry Ray Clark
(1936–2006), Born Bartlett, Texas; Lived and worked in Houston and Huntsville, Texas
Courtesy the Artists:
Malik Gaines (b. 1973), Born Visalia, California; Lives and works in New York, New York
Alexandro Segade
(b. 1973), Born San Diego, California; Lives and works in New York, New York
Thornton Dial
(b. 1928), Born Emelle, Alabama; Lives and works in Bessemer, Alabama
Minnie Evans
(1892–1987), Born Long Creek, North Carolina; Lived and worked in Wilmington, North Carolina
Theaster Gates
(b. 1973), Born Chicago, Illinois; Lives and works in Chicago, Illinois
Deborah Grant
(b. 1968), Born Toronto, Canada; Lives and works in New York, New York
Trenton Doyle Hancock
(b. 1974), Born Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Lives and works in Houston, Texas
David Hammons
(b. 1943), Born, Springfield, Illinois; Lives and works in New York, New York
Bessie Harvey
(1928–1994), Born Dallas, Georgia; Lived and worked in Alabamacoa, Tennessee
Lonnie Holley
(b. 1950), Born Birmingham, Alabama; Lives and works in Birmingham, Alabama
Frank Albert Jones
(1900–1969), Born Clarksville, Texas; Lived and worked in Huntsville, Texas
Lauren Kelley
(b. 1975), Born Baltimore, Maryland; Lives and works in New York, New York
Ralph Lemon
(b. 1952), Born Cincinnati, Ohio; Lives and works in New York, New York
Kerry James Marshall
(b. 1955), Born Birmingham, Alabama; Lives and works in Chicago, Illinois
Rodney McMillian
(b. 1969), Born Columbia, South Carolina; Lives and works in Los Angeles, California
Joe Minter
(b. 1943), Born Birmingham, Alabama; Lives and works in Birmingham, Alabama
J.B. Murray
(1908–1988), Born Sandersville, Georgia; Lived and worked in Glascock County, Georgia
John Outterbridge
(b. 1933), Born Greenville, North Carolina; Lives and works in Los Angeles, California
Noah Purifoy
(1917–2004), Born Snow Hill, Alabama; Lived and worked in Joshua Tree, California
Marie “Big Mama” Roseman
(1898–2004), Born Tippo, Mississippi; Lived and worked in Benton Harbor, Michigan
Jacolby Satterwhite
(b. 1986), Born Columbia, South Carolina; Lives and works in New York, New York
Patricia Satterwhite
(b.1950) Born Columbia, South Carolina; Lives and works in Columbia, South Carolina
Rudy Shepherd
(b. 1975), Born Baltimore, Maryland; Lives and works in New York, New York,  and State College, Pennsylvania
Xaviera Simmons
(b. 1974), Born New York, New York; Lives and works in New York, New York
Georgia Speller
(1931–1988), Born Aberdeen, Mississippi; Lived and worked in Memphis, Tennessee
Henry Speller
(1900–1996), Born Panther Bum, Mississippi; Lived and worked in Memphis, Tennessee
James “Son” Thomas
(1926–1993), Born Eden, Mississippi; Lived and worked in Greenville, Mississippi
Stacy Lynn Waddell
(b. 1966), Born Washington, D.C.; Lives and works in Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Kara Walker
(b. 1969), Born Stockton, California; Lives and works in New York, New York
Carrie Mae Weems
(b. 1953), Born Portland, Oregon; Lives and works in Syracuse, New York
Geo Wyeth
(b. 1984), Born New York, New York; Lives and works in New York, New York
When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South
is accompanied by a catalogue featuring essays by the exhibition’s organizer, Assistant Curator Thomas J. Lax, along with leading scholars Horace D. Ballard Jr., Katherine Jentleson, Scott Romine and Lowery Stokes Sims, who write on notions of spirituality, the ethics of self-taught art and the idea of the South in the American project.
When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South
exhibition catalogue is generously supported by the Ed Bradley Family Foundation.
Glenn Kaino: 19.83
On October 16, 1968, during the medal ceremony for the men’s 200-meter race at the Mexico City Olympic Games, American athletes Tommie Smith, then twenty-four, and John Carlos raised their black-gloved fists in a symbolic act of protest. This gesture, seen around the world and captured through images that would go on to circulate well beyond the act itself, became a catalytic symbol fora myriad of beliefs, ideas and social causes.
For 19.83, Los Angeles–based artist Glenn Kaino (b. 1972) presents the New York debut of two works that mark the genesis of his ongoing collaboration with Olympian Tommie Smith.
Bridge (2013) will transform the Museum’s street-level atrium space with a large-scale installation, while
19.83 (2013) will be presented in the Museum’s Project Space.
In Bridge, Kaino uses several gold-painted casts of Tommie Smith’s arm to assemble a sculptural installation that takes the form of an upward-leading bridge. The structure, echoing multiple histories and ideas associated with the iconic image of Smith and Carlos, becomes a reservoir of memories that allows for the merging of past and present stories and a site to reflect on the impact of a powerful gesture nearly four decades after its occurrence.
Bridge will be in conversation with 19.83, a sculptural environment from that also gives the exhibition its name. The work refers to Smith’s world record–breaking completion of the 200-meter race in 19.83 seconds, and takes the form of a three-level platform reminiscent of the one
used to honor the top competitors at the Olympics. Plated in gold, the reflective and monumental object gives shape to the complexities of memory and brings form to the structures in which narratives are created, transmitted, challenged and remade.
Together, these works are an examination of the conditions from which symbolic moments such as the salute enter history, how these circumstances evolve over time and how memory and history compete for relevance in the present.
Glenn Kaino: 19.83
is organized by Assistant Curator Naima J. Keith.
Draped Down
In 1942, cultural anthropologist and novelist Zora Neale Hurston listed the term “draped down” as one of several terms meaning “well-dressed” in a glossary of Harlem Renaissance–era slang. The term seems as prescient today as it did when Hurston first recorded it.
Draped Down highlights the ways in which feminine beauty is constructed, traced and interpreted in painting and photography.
Triggering the senses through color, tone, form, context and memory, fashion and art intersect inworks by artists including
Njideka Akunyili
(b. 1983),
Narcissister
(b. 1971),
Malick Sidibé
(b. 1935),
James VanDerZee
(1886–1983),
Xaviera Simmons
(b. 1974)
and
Fatima Tuggar
(b. 1967).

March 26, 2014 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CARRIE MAE WEEMS in January! The Museum Series 1/30-6/29 @ Studio Museum in Harlem and Three Decades of Photography and Video 1/24-5/14 @ The Guggenheim Museum

Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series

The Studio Museum in Harlem is pleased to announce the Winter 2014 exhibition, Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series, on view January 30–June 29, 2014. The exhibition comprises selections from Weems’s ongoing series of self-portraits, where she stands, with her back turned to the camera, in proximity to some of the world’s leading museums and cultural institutions. The resulting images act as ruminations on the collecting and exhibiting practices of these sites.

Since 1978, Weems (b. 1953, Portland, Oregon) has examined the historical complexities of identity, class and social relations through photography and other media, such as video, installation, sound and text.

Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series is organized by Lauren Haynes, assistant curator. The exhibition runs concurrently with Weems’s mid-career retrospective, organized by the Frist Center for Visual Arts in Nashville, on view at the Guggenheim Museum from January 24 – May 14, 2014.

The Studio Museum in Harlem is pleased to announce the

Winter 2014 exhibition,
Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series, on view
January 30–June 29,2014.
The exhibition comprises selections from Weems’s ongoing series of self-portraits, where she
stands, with her back turned to the camera, in proximity to some of the world’s leading museums and
cultural institutions. The resulting images act as ruminations on the collecting and exhibiting practices
of these sites.
Since 1978, Weems (b. 1953, Portland, Oregon) has examined the historical complexities of
identity, class and social relations through photography and other media, such as video, installation,
sound and text. Working in series, her generally black-and-white photographs articulate and reify the
African-American experience in particular for broad contemplation. Varying from intimate to sweeping
in scale, Weems’s diverse oeuvre reflects the artist’s commitment to revealing inequalities that
potentially touch upon all segments of humanity.
Carrie Mae Weems,
Project Row Houses
(from “The Museum Series”) (detail), 2006–present. Digital chromogenic print, 72 × 60 inches.
Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

“The Museum Series” (2006–present) shows Weems, shrouded in black, traveling to domestic
locations, such as the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Project Row Houses in Houston, as well as
outside of the United States to the Tate Modern, London; the Pergamon Museum in Berlin; and the
Galleria Nazionale D’Arte Moderna in Rome. The images are complicated by her position as an
artist in relationship to these institutions as well as by the constellation of race and gender inequality,
agency and access that surround them. Implicated in each photograph by virtue of size and physical
position, the viewer is asked to question the manner by which cultural institutions affirm or reject
certain histories through their collecting and display decisions.
Weems was born in Portland, Oregon, in 1953. She earned a BFA from the California Institute
of the Arts, Valencia (1981), and an MFA in photography from the University of California, San Diego
(1984), continuing her studies in the Graduate Program in Folklore at the University of California,
Berkeley (1984-1987). She is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, including Rome
Prize Fellowship (2006); Skowhegan Medal for Photography (2007). In 2012, Weems received a
Medal of Arts from the U.S. Department of State and in 2013 she was the recipient of a Lifetime
Achievement Award from the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. Weems was named a 2013
MacArthur Fellow. The artist lives and works in Syracuse, New York.
Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series
is organized by
Lauren Haynes, assistant curator
and runs concurrently with Weems’s mid-career retrospective, on view at the Guggenheim Museum
from January 24 – May 14, 2014.
Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video
was organized by the Frist Center for Visual Arts in Nashville and has traveled to the Portland Art Museum,
The Cleveland Museum of Art and the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University

CMW MotherDaughter 490

Guggenheim Museum Presents Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video


First New York Museum Retrospective for 2013 MacArthur Award-Winning Artist

Exhibition:                  Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video
Venue:                       Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Location:                    Annex Levels 2 and 4; Monitor 4; Thannhauser 4; New Media Theater
Dates:                        January 24–May 14, 2014
In January 2014, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video, the first major New York museum retrospective devoted to this socially motivated artist. Weems has long been acclaimed as one of the most eloquent and respected interpreters of African American experiences, and she continues to be an important influence for many young artists today. Featuring more than 120 works—primarily photographs, but also texts, videos, and an audio recording—as well as a range of related educational programs, this comprehensive survey offers an opportunity to experience the full breadth of the artist’s oeuvre and gain new insight into her practice.

Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video is organized by the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, Tennessee. The exhibition has been curated by Kathryn Delmez, the Frist Center, where it opened in September 2012. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presentation is organized by Jennifer Blessing, Senior Curator, Photography, with Susan Thompson, Assistant Curator. This exhibition is supported in part by The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The Leadership Committee for Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video is also gratefully acknowledged for its support, including Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Robert Menschel Vital Projects, and Jack Shainman Gallery, as well as Henry Buhl, Crystal R. McCrary and Raymond J. McGuire, Beth Rudin DeWoody, and Toby Devan Lewis. Additional funding is provided by the William Talbott Hillman Foundation.

The work of Carrie Mae Weems (b. 1953, Portland, Oregon) invites contemplation of issues surrounding race, gender, and class inequality. Over the past thirty years, Weems has used her art to bring to light the ignored or erased experiences of marginalized people. Her work proposes a multidimensional picture of history and humanity, intended to spur greater cultural awareness and compassion. Although her subjects are often African American, Weems wants “people of color to stand for the human multitudes” and for her art to resonate with audiences of all backgrounds.

Organized in a loosely chronological order throughout two of the museum’s Annex Levels, the exhibition begins on Level 2 with the series Family Pictures and Stories (1978–84). This series, like many of Weems’s early works, explores matters relating to contemporary black identity, highlighting individuals in social contexts—including in this case her own kin. Her landmark Kitchen Table Series (1990) employs text and photography to explore the range of women’s roles within a community, pointedly situating the photographs’ subject within a domestic setting. Selections from Weems’s Sea Islands Series (1991–92), Africa (1993), and Slave Coast (1993) demonstrate her ongoing interest in language and storytelling. These works, made during the artist’s travels to the titular locales, pair images with evocative vernacular texts or etymological investigations that trace English words to African roots. The artist’s practice emphasizes the role of both spoken and written narrative, reflecting her graduate studies in folklore.

Weems often appropriates words and images, re-presenting them to viewers as biting reminders of the persistence of bigoted attitudes in the United States. Her renowned series From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried (1995-96), presented on Annex Level 4, layers new text over found historical imagery to critique and lament prejudiced attitudes toward African Americans throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. A yearning to investigate the underlying causes and effects of racism, slavery, and imperialism has spurred Weems to travel widely throughout the United States, Africa, Europe, and the Caribbean. During extended visits to these places, depicted in series such as Dreaming in Cuba (2002), The Louisiana Project (2003), and Roaming (2006), all represented in the exhibition, she looks to the surrounding land and architecture in order to foster communion with inhabitants past and present.

Video is a natural extension of Weems’s narrative photographic practice, also providing an opportunity for the artist to include music in her work. Although she worked in film during her undergraduate years at the California Institute of the Arts, Weems’s first major endeavor in the medium came in 2003–04 with Coming Up for Air, a work comprised of series of poetic vignettes that will be screened in the New Media Theater in the Guggenheim’s Sackler Center for Arts Education. Other video works, including Italian Dreams (2006), Afro Chic (2009), and Constructing History: A Requiem to Mark the Moment (2008) will be integrated into the exhibition near related photographs.

Exhibition Catalogue
The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated catalogue, published by Yale University Press. The catalogue includes a foreword by Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director, W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University, and scholarly essays by Kathryn Delmez, Curator, Frist Center for the Visual Arts; Franklin Sirmans, Terri and Michael Smooke Curator of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Robert Storr, Dean, Yale University School of Art; and Deborah Willis, Professor of Photography and Imaging, Tisch School for the Arts, New York University. It will be available for $50 at guggenheimstore.org.

Education and Public Programs
A range of public programs will be presented in conjunction with Carrie Mae Weems, with details to be posted at guggenheim.org/publicprograms. Highlights include:

Carrie Mae Weems: Live from the Guggenheim
April 25, 26, 27
Carrie Mae Weems hosts an all-star cast of musicians, artists, activists, writers, and other celebrated guests in a series of museum sessions drawn from the inspirational context of Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video. This multidisciplinary performance salon will embody issues of identity, politics, narrative, and history that Weems engages in her work. Tickets and more information will soon be available on guggenheim.org/calendar

Exhibition Video
January 24–May 14
Mon–Wed, Fri, Sun, 1 pm and 3 pm
Weem’s Coming Up for Air (2003–04) features a series of unrelated yet linked vignettes that examine human relationships, including those between black men and white women in antebellum New Orleans, quarreling sisters hoping for reconciliation, a child and an adored father, and young idealistic lovers (suggestive of Winnie and Nelson Mandela) before a loss of innocence. The film will be screened in the New Media Theater in the museum’s Sackler Center for Arts Education. Free with museum admission.

Curator’s Eye Tours
Friday, February 7, 2 pm: Jennifer Blessing
Friday, March 14, 2 pm: Susan Thompson
Free with museum admission

About Carrie Mae Weems
Born in Portland, Oregon in 1953, Weems earned an MFA from the University of California, San Diego in 1984. Weems has been featured in solo exhibitions organized by institutions including the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (1991); New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (1991); National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC (1993); Museum of Modern Art, New York (1995); Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris, New York (1998); Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, MA (2000); and Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporaneo, Seville (2010). Weems’s work has also been included in several important international exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial (1991); Black Male, Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary American Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1994); 2nd Johannesburg Biennale, Africus Institute of Contemporary Art, Johannesburg, South Africa (1997); Only Skin Deep: Changing Visions of the American Self, International Center of Photography, New York (2003); Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography, Museum of Modern Art, New York (2010); La Triennale, Intense Proximity, Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2012), among many others.

Weems has been celebrated with numerous awards and honors, including a Smithsonian Fellowship (1987); Louis Comfort Tiffany Award (1992); National Endowment for the Arts Visual Arts Grant (1994–95); The May Ingraham Bunting Award, Radcliffe College, Cambridge, MA (1995); The Alpert Award for Visual Arts (1996); Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in Photography (2002); Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize Fellowship (2005–06); Honorary Degree from Colgate University, Hamilton, NY (2007); Skowhegan Medal for Photography, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Skowhegan, ME (2007); Anonymous Was a Woman Foundation, New York (2007); Honorary Doctorate, Smith College, Northampton, MA (2011); Medal of Arts award from the U. S. State Department (2012); Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Honoree (2013); and National Academician (2013). In addition, Weems was recently awarded a 2013 MacArthur Fellowship by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao which opened in 1997, and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, currently in development. Looking to the future, the Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that take contemporary art, architecture, and design beyond the walls of the museum. More information about the foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.

VISITOR INFORMATION
Admission: Adults $22, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. The Guggenheim’s new, free app,available with admission or by download to personal devices, offers an enhanced visitor experience. The app features content on special exhibitions, including Carrie Mae Weems, as well as access to more than 1,300 works in the Guggenheim’s permanent collection and information about the museum’s landmark building. A verbal imaging guide for the collection is available for visitors who are blind or have low vision. The Guggenheim app is sponsored by Bloomberg.

Museum Hours: Sun–Wed, 10 am–5:45 pm; Fri, 10 am–5:45 pm; Sat, 10 am–7:45 pm; closed Thurs. On Saturdays, beginning at 5:45 pm, the museum hosts Pay What You Wish. For general information, call 212 423 3500 or visit the museum online at: guggenheim.org and guggenheim.org/connect

December 28, 2013 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Art Exhibition – The Shadows Took Shape — STUDIO MUSEUM IN HARLEM 11/14/13 – 3/9/14

Upcoming

The Shadows Took Shape

Nov 14, 2013 – Mar 9, 2014
  • Cyrus Kabiru
    Nairobian Baboon (from C-Stunners series), 2012
    Courtesy the artist
    Photo: Amunga Eshuchi

The Shadows Took Shape is a dynamic interdisciplinary exhibition exploring contemporary art through the lens of Afrofuturist aesthetics. Coined in 1994 by writer Mark Dery in his essay “Black to the Future,” the term “Afrofuturism” refers to a creative and intellectual genre that emerged as a strategy to explore science fiction, fantasy, magical realism and pan-Africanism. With roots in the avant-garde musical stylings of sonic innovator Sun Ra (born Herman Poole Blount, 1914–1993), Afrofuturism has been used by artists, writers and theorists as a way to prophesize the future, redefine the present and reconceptualize the past. The Shadows Took Shape will be one of the few major museum exhibitions to explore the ways in which this form of creative expression has been adopted internationally and highlight the range of work made over the past twenty-five years.

The exhibition draws its title from an obscure Sun Ra poem and a posthumously released series of recordings. Providing an apt metaphor for the long shadow cast by Sun Ra and others, the exhibition will feature more than sixty works of art, including ten new commissions, charting the evolution of Afrofuturist tendencies by an international selection of established and emerging practitioners. These works span not only personal themes of identity and self-determination in the African-American community, but also persistent concerns of techno-culture, geographies, utopias and dystopias, as well as universal preoccupations with time and space.

The twenty-nine artists featured in The Shadows Took Shape work in a wide variety of media, including photography, video, painting, drawing, sculpture and multimedia installation. Participating artists include Derrick AdamsJohn Akomfrah, Laylah AliEdgar Arceneaux, Sanford Biggers, Edgar Cleijne + Ellen Gallagher, William Cordova (in collaboration with Nyeema Morgan and Otabenga Jones & Associates), Cristina De Middel, Khaled Hafez, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Kira Lynn Harris, Kiluanji Kia Henda, Wayne Hodge, David Huffman, Cyrus Kabiru, Wanuri Kahiu, Hew Locke, Mehreen Murtaza, Wangechi Mutu, Harold Offeh, The Otolith Group, Robert Pruitt, Sun RaRAMM:ΣLL:ZΣΣ, Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Larissa Sansour, Cauleen Smith, William Villalongo and Saya Woolfalk.

Accompanying the exhibition will be a 160-page, fully illustrated exhibition catalogue (designed by Kimberly Varella of Content Object, Los Angeles), with twenty-nine artist entries and essays by the exhibition’s curators; an introduction by Studio Museum Director and Chief Curator Thelma Golden; and newly commissioned essays by foremost scholars and writers Tegan Bristow; Samuel R. Delany; Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky, That Subliminal Kid; Kodwo Eshun; and Alondra Nelson; and a tumblr page, shadowstookshape.tumblr.com.

The Shadows Took Shape is organized by Naima J. Keith, Assistant Curator and Zoe Whitley, independent curator.

– See more at: http://www.studiomuseum.org/exhibition/the-shadows-took-shape#sthash.6zHF28DJ.dpuf

October 11, 2013 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, LIFESTYLES, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

ART EXHIBITION — Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art

Radical Presence Black Performance in Contemporary Art

Nov 14, 2013 – Mar 9, 2014
  • Senga Nengudi
    Performance Piece, 1978
    Activated by Maren Hassinger
    Image courtesy the artist and Thomas Erben Gallery, New York
    Photo: Harmon Outlaw

Providing a critical history beginning with Fluxus and Conceptual art in the early 1960s through present-day practices, Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art chronicles the emergence and development of black performance art over three generations, presenting a rich and complex look at this important facet of contemporary art. The exhibition comprises more than 100 works by some 36 artists, including video and photo documentation of performances, performance scores and installations, interactive works, and artworks created as a result of performance actions.

The exhibition, organized by Valerie Cassel Oliver for the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, will be presented in New York in two parts:

Part I will be on view September 10 to December 7, 2013, at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery

Part II will take place November 14, 2013 to March 9, 2014 at The Studio Museum in Harlem.

Radical Presence at the Studio Museum will feature an array of video, performance-based photography, and documentation, alongside set pieces or objects used during or remnants resulting from the artists’ actions, marking the many methods employed in making performance. The Studio Museum’s presentation includes both historic and contemporary works by Derrick Adams, Terry Adkins, Papo Colo, Jamal Cyrus, Zachary Fabri, Sherman Fleming (aka RodForce), Theaster Gates, Girl (Chitra Ganesh + Simone Leigh), David Hammons, Lyle Ashton Harris, Wayne Hodge, Shaun El C. Leonardo, Kalup Linzy, Dave McKenzie, Jayson Musson (aka Hennessy Youngman), Senga Nengudi, Tameka Norris, Lorraine O’Grady, Clifford Owens, Benjamin Patterson, Adam Pendleton, Pope.L, Jacolby Satterwhite, Dread Scott, Xaviera Simmons, Sur Rodney (Sur) and Carrie Mae Weems.

The exhibition will be accompanied by more than a dozen live performances and public programs throughout its six-month run. These include a series of performances co-organized with Performa 13, New York’s celebrated performance-art biennial (November 1–24, 2013). The exhibition will be accompanied by an 144-page, illustrated hardcover catalogue, a major contribution to scholarship on performance art as well as black visual art, and an interactive website, radicalpresenceny.org.

  • Carrie Mae Weems
    Hopes and Dreams: Gestures of Demonstration, Performance Gesture 14 or If I Ruled the World, 2006-07
    Courtesy the artist

– See more at: http://www.studiomuseum.org/exhibition/radical-presence-black-performance-in-contemporary-art#sthash.UCDG9r3K.dpuf

The Studio Museum in Harlem presentation of Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art is organized by Thomas J. Lax, Assistant Curator.

– See more at: http://www.studiomuseum.org/exhibition/radical-presence-black-performance-in-contemporary-art#sthash.OwlgjJ5d.dpuf

October 6, 2013 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

You’re Invited! The BESSIES New York’s Dance and Performance Awards Oct 15, 2012

 
You’re Invited
Produced in partnership with Dance/NYC
Monday October 15, 2012
253 West 125th Street
Hosted by Elizabeth Streb.
 

 Photo by Mary Ellen Mark
 
Award presentations by Marina Abramovic, luciana achugar, Ron Brown, Brenda Bufalino, Archie Burnett, Stuart Hodes, Kevin McKenzie, Bebe Neuwirth, Charles Reinhart, Rokafella, David Thomson, Wendy Whelan and more.
 
Performances by Souleymane Badolo and Trisha Brown Company.
Click here to see a list of award nominees.
Doors open at 7 pm, ceremony begins promptly at 8 pm.
Drinks and food available for purchase at the theater.
Tickets $10, available at www.apollotheater.org and at the Apollo box office.
To further support the Bessies, please choose the Bessie Supporter ticket for $20,
online or at the Apollo box office.
Join the Bessie Angels at a pre-show benefit cocktail reception at 
 beginning at 6 pm, including an awards ceremony ticket. 
Everyone is invited to the free after-party following the ceremony at the 

 

 Photos 2011 Christopher Duggan 
The Bessies Awards pre-show cocktail reception is a fundraiser to benefit The Bessies, a sponsored program with Performance Zone Inc (dba The Field), a not-for-profit, tax-exempt, 501(c)(3) organization. For more information about The Field contact: The Field, 161 Sixth Avenue, 14th Floor, New York NY 10013, (212) 691-6969, fax: (212) 255-2053, www.thefield.org. A copy of The Field’s latest annual report may be obtained, upon request, from The Field or from the Office of the Attorney General, Charities Bureau, 120 Broadway, New York, NY 10271. Contributions are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. You will receive a tax deduction for all but the $15 value of refreshments.
 

October 12, 2012 Posted by | CULTURE, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

PARIS Jan 17-20, 2013 Black Portraiture(s): The Black Body in the West Symposium

Africana Studies at New York University

Black Portraiture[s]: The Black Body in the West, 2013-Paris

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 Update your faculty profile

September 6, 2012 Posted by | ART, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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