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FILM/ Festivals – Reviews #NYAFF2017

More from Tanimaru!

 

Tokyo Sky

Shinji and Mika are two young people trying to make their way in Tokyo. He is a day laborer blind in one eye and she is a girl from “inaka” the countryside with a dysfunctional past. One of Shinji’s friends dies while on the job and at his funeral Mika and Shinji begin a relationship – a relationship that is slow and careful as the world around them changes with death and people moving on. Both actors charm you as they manage the dog eat dog world of Tokyo. There is a street singer appearing throughout the film and they suppose another loser in Tokyo, but in the end, her face appears on the side of a van advertizing her first EP.

Aside from a couple of places where animation suddenly appears, the claustrophobia and busy world of Tokyo is accurately rendered. The narration is a bit on the nose in places and one might wonder if it is really necessary because the visuals do a very good job of telling the story of what it is like living for the city and trying to find love and companionship.
Happiness
I have followed the work of Masatoshi Nagase since his first films with Argo Project more than 25 years ago. Nagase is a veteran now, a true leading man with the gravitas fitting Japan’s most famous actors. His sensitive performance in AHN still stays with me. Here in HAPPINESS he is guided by Sabu, whose film CHASUKE’S JOURNEY was a cinematic tour de force in last year’s NYAFF. Nagase plays a man who arrives in a small town with a happiness helmet and when the residents put it on, they see they most treasured memories. But there is a dark side, that will soon emerge for Nagase’s character and it is here where the film take a turn into a kind of madness. Nagase is stoic throughout. A carefully measured performance of depth. HAPPINESS is not happiness at a certain point in the film, but the journey leading to happiness, for the patient, is worth taking.
Aroused By Gymnopedes
Since this is a Nikkatsu film, it is easy to understand why just about every 10 minutes there is a sex scene, but what is so strange is the lack of a coherent story to wrap around the frequent trysts in the movie. Furuya is a has been director. Washed up, hasn’t made a film in about a decade and in the midst of a possible come back, his lead actress quits. Thus begins a series of wanderings as Furuya beds numerous women including his student and finally a nurse at the hospital where is wife lies in a coma. There is also a horny neighbor who tries to seduce him from the start. The music of Erik Satie seems to be the cue for the sex business to start with whomever is in close quarters to Furuya but this one trick pony runs out of steam pretty early in the film. The composition “Gymnopies” by Satie was played by Furuya’s wife and clearly it was her tool to arouse him – a tune that obviously continues to play in his head with every woman he encounters.
Dawn Of The Felines
DAWN OF THE FELINES is a romp. A look at the lives of young ladies in Tokyo trying to make ends meet via sex for sale agencies. Masako is the lead lady who has a on and off relationship with a client. There is another who is clearly a single mom trying to manage child care while she turns tricks and finally Rie, who is married but unknown to her husband is also having sex for money. The film is clever shooting on the streets of Tokyo in a wonderful guerilla style. The actors are not shy about showing the underbelly of sex life in Tokyo – a world that is pretty much out of the view for a foreigner. So with some laughs and sad moments, the reality of life in Tokyo is revealed. Don’t point a finger at these ladies – they know full well what they are doing.
DEALER HEALER
Totally retro in design and execution, DEALER/HEALER is an homage to the early films of Chinese gangsters and the ladies who love them. “Cheater Hua” is the archetype of the gangster who is reformed and proceeds to get the members of his inner circle to do the same. My only criticism is the overly used soundtrack that is way to on the nose. This may also be a homage but in some ways it seems to take away from storytelling, but if you like this genre, DEALER/HEALER will please
RAGE
Is an elegant thriller. A fine performance by Ken Watanabe. We have missed this subtile but powerful work in a small film. He reaffirms his status and stardom. The rest of the cast is also effective and committed. The intertwining stories don’t really connect, so re-reading the synopsis for RAGE – I wanted to have a frame for these comments. Each of the three stories is so compelling I keep wondering why “rage” became the title? There is clearly rage in the Okinawan story, even though it subverts geography to place a American GI drinking area next door to Naha’s main market – the real distance is at least a 30 minute drive and this is important because this is the inciting incident of the this story. I was moved, entertained and I was engaged in the firm and confident structure of the film but at the end I kind of wished that one of the stories had been the focus of the film.
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July 14, 2017 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, FILM, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Film / Festivals / Review SOMEONE TO TALK TO — #NYAFF2017

Another Excellent Revie from our own Tanimaru.

 

Right from the start, it is too good to be true, after viewing one couple who want to divorce, Angio and Lina proudly submit their papers for marriage. Fast forward 10 years and now with a daughter, they are falling apart. Angio’s sister plants the seed that Lina is cheating. Lush in visuals (you can almost taste the food of a restaurant) SOMEONE TO TALK TO pulls you into a world of infidelity, pursuit and murderous plans. The sense of China as mix of traditional and contemporary is both fascinating and tragic as the marriage falls apart and other adulterer goes back to his partner. Angio refuses to divorce Lina so she runs away with her lover, leaving her daughter and her life behind to be cared for by her sister in law and a new husband, as Angio travels north pretending to look for them. He meets an old high school friend, recently divorced, who shares with him – “Life is in the Future, not the past”. Angio leaves abruptly as his daughter falls ill. When she finally wakes up, he goes out to buy her wontons and at the station, meets Lina, still on the run. Considering first to kill them both, he abandons his plan now ready to divorce her and move into the future.

Everyone in the movie talks about wanting “someone to talk to”. Relationships have fallen apart because people do no communicate. SOMEONE TO TALK TO is sensitive and full of life – ordinary people seeking someone to talk to.

July 10, 2017 Posted by | CULTURE, FILM, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Film/Festivals – NY Asian Film Festival Review — SOUL MATE

An EXCELLENT Recommendation foe tonight’s #FSLC/#SubwayCinema screening!

 

 

Derek Tsang’s SOUL MATE is a wonderful film. The performances by the lead actresses playing July and Ansen are marvelous and capture you right from the start. The screenplay is smart and loaded with excitement and twists to the very end. Above all, it is a film about the power of love and friendship that endures and endures. Don’t miss it!

July 7, 2017 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, FILM, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

#FSLC announces Scary Movies X, July 14-20 *nyc

Boo.


Terrifier

The Film Society of Lincoln Center presents Scary Movies X, the eagerly awaited return of New York’s top horror festival, July 14-20.

Scary Movies X brings the genre’s best from around the globe to FSLC, featuring an exhilarating week of terrifying and gruesome shockers, a host of hair-raising premieres and rediscoveries, and guest appearances and giveaways.

Opening Night is the New York Premiere of Damien Leone’s aptly named Terrifier, the follow-up to his earlier All Hallow’s Eve, which finds creepy cult killer Art the Clown back on the prowl. The screening will be followed by the fest’s “Cake, Clowns & Corpses”–themed 10th birthday party. Scary Movies X closes with a double dose of dread: the New York premieres of Brandon Christensen’s Overlook Film Festival prizewinner Still/Born, serving up heaps of new mommy trauma; and Colin Minihan’s It Stains the Sands Red, an inventive zombie picture set in the blistering desert.

Other highlights include Damien Powers’s Killing Ground, a “straight-up, stripped-down suspenser” (Variety) about a camping trip gone wrong in the Australian bush; Caught, Jamie Patterson’s subtle, otherworldly home-invasion pic starring Mickey Sumner; Pavan Kirpalani’s Hindi head-trip Phobia; and Daniel Castro Zimbrón’s The Darkness, a highly atmospheric post-apocaylptic thriller lensed by Diego García (Neon Bull, Cemetery of Splendor).

Continuing the fest’s 10th anniversary celebrations are a quartet of delightfully nasty party-themed flicks from the 1970s and ’80s: Ed Hunt’s Bloody Birthday, George McCowan’s Frogs, J. Lee Thompson’s Happy Birthday to Me, and William Fruet’s Killer Party. And to top it all off, Scary Movies X presents an evening with comedy legend and horror maestro Bob Balaban in person, featuring screenings of his Parents and My Boyfriend’s Back, both films ripe for rediscovery.

Tickets for Scary Movies X go on sale June 29. Tickets are $14; $11 for students and seniors (62+); and $9 for Film Society members. See more and save with a 3+ film discount package or $125 All Access Pass. Learn more at filmlinc.org.

Programmed by Laura Kern and Rufus de Rham. Scary Movies X is sponsored by IFC Midnight.

FILMS & DESCRIPTIONS
All films screen digitally at the Walter Reade Theater unless otherwise noted.

Opening Night
Terrifier
Damien Leone, USA, 2016, 82m
Coulrophobics beware! It’s Halloween night and Art the Clown, the cold-blooded killer who also stalked Damien Leone’s previous short of the same name and his 2013 omnibus feature All Hallow’s Eve, is not wearing a creepy costume just for show. He’s as evil as he looks—seriously, the scariest clown to ever hit movie screens—and, after an evening of partying, two young women unluckily enter his sights. At first they’re mildly amused by his presence (the ditzier of the two even dares take a selfie with him), but soon they understand the true danger he presents, as he proceeds to terrorize them, as well as anyone else who crosses his path. Lean and oh so mean, Terrifier is grittier, and more jarringly depraved, than most horror movies these days, oozing ’80s slasher–style gore. New York Premiere
Friday, July 14, 7:30pm (Q&A with Damien Leone)

Closing Night
Still/Born
Brandon Christensen, Canada, 2017, 84m
Young couple Mary and Jack are about to become proud first-time parents to a set of twins. But something goes wrong in the delivery room and only one baby makes it out alive. Mary, feeling somewhat displaced, living in a new home and neighborhood, begins to exhibit paranoid tendencies—is she dealing with postpartum depression or are demons in fact trying to steal her newborn as she vigorously claims? Winner of a special jury prize for “scariest film” at the recent inaugural edition of the Overlook Film Festival and co-produced and -written by Colin Minihan, director of the other closing-night selection, It Stains the Sand Red, the film is indeed chockful of frights. And as everything continues to spiral further out of control, Still/Born stays grounded thanks to the intense, dedicated performance of Christie Burke as the mother who means business in keeping her baby safe no matter what forces are against her. New York Premiere
Thursday, July 20, 7:00pm

Closing Night
It Stains the Sands Red
Colin Minihan, USA, 2016, 92m
The solo feature directorial debut of Colin Minihan, one half of the Vicious Brothers (Grave Encounters, Extraterrestrial), makes his strongest impression yet with this engaging, visually striking film, set during apocalyptic times, about a woman, Molly (a fearless Brittany Allen), who finds herself stranded in the desert after her dumbass boyfriend is killed by a zombie. As she’s pursued by the threatening yet slow-moving creature, who relentlessly trails her close behind, the film becomes something of a character study of victims, both monster and human—a zombie humanized with a happy past, and a woman desensitized by a more troubled one. The mortals that pop up in the story, as per usual, are often just as bad as the monsters; Molly herself is flawed, a drug addict who has abandoned her young daughter, but who throughout a series of terrible incidents remains strong because hardship is nothing new for her. A Dark Sky Films release. New York Premiere
Thursday, July 20, 9:30pm (Q&A with Colin Minihan)

Better Watch Out
Chris Peckover, USA/Australia, 2016, 89m
Encompassing three great traditions of horror—the Christmas, home-invasion, and babysitting subgenres—Better Watch Out is a twisted and twisty mash-up of dark delights as filtered through the lens of an ’80s teen comedy. Cheeky 12-year-old Luke (Levi Miller) has long crushed on his super-cute, and of course already taken, babysitter Ashley (Olivia DeJonge) and decides that while under her watch on Christmas Eve he will finally make his move. But the big night is disrupted by the arrival of a menacing masked intruder, setting the scene for a chain reaction of progressively disturbing events. Virginia Madsen and Patrick Warburton appear as Luke’s parents, who, along with audiences, are in for a truly chilling holiday surprise. A Well Go USA release. New York Premiere
Tuesday, July 18, 7:00pm

Bloody Birthday
Ed Hunt, USA, 1981, 85m
“Just because you all have the same birthday doesn’t mean you’re special,” a teacher informs tight-knit trio Steven, Curtis, and Debbie as they turn 10. She’s right—it’s that their simultaneous births in 1970 Southern California occurred during a solar eclipse that makes their situation out of the ordinary. Apparently, Saturn, which is known to control the emotions, was blocked, leaving the astrologically ill-timed children cold-hearted. And, for some unexplained reason, a decade into their lives, the little maniacs set out to wreak some bloody havoc, sparing no one, not even their own families, in their murder spree, on which they put to use a wide array of weapons, including guns, ropes, cars, and arrows. With inspired direction, loads of nudity, and a moody score, this is pure ’80s trash cinema, and evil-kid horror, at its finest.
Saturday, July 15, 3:15pm

Caught
Jamie Patterson, UK, 2017, 85m
One afternoon, married journalists Julie and Andrew (Mickey Sumner and Ruben Crow) residing in the remote English countryside are paid a visit by an impeccably styled couple, whose odd manner of communication suggest there’s a disconnect, to say the least. Roles are reversed—the journalists become the interview subjects as they are questioned about their current research—and it begins to look like they may have stumbled upon something sinister. The behavior of the unwelcome guests (played perfectly by Cian Barry and April Pearson) becomes increasingly bizarre, and that Julie and Andrew have a tiny baby at home and a young son due back from school any moment only adds to the tension. Like its title, so succinct, even generic, until its meaning is put into clearer focus, Caught is a stellar example of what can be accomplished with little means but a whole lot of imagination, while also reminding us that it’s often the unknown that can be the most terrifying. North American Premiere
Sunday, July 16, 7:00pm

The Darkness / Las tinieblas
Daniel Castro Zimbrón, Mexico/France, 2016, 94m
After a mysterious apocalypse, Gustavo (Brontis Jodorowsky, who channels an intensity worthy of his family name) is left to care for his two sons, adult Marcos and teenage Argel, and his sickly young daughter, Luciana. The family has made their stand in a cabin in the woods, bathed in an eternal twilight and perpetually surrounded by toxic fog that may hide monsters. Gustavo keeps the children locked in the basement for their safety, but when early in the film he and Marcos venture outside to hunt for food, Marcos didn’t come back—and Argel is left to discover the secrets that his father and the woods are hiding. Claustrophobic, and exquisitely shot by Diego García (Neon Bull, Cemetery of Splendor), The Darkness transcends the horror tropes it gets its bones from, and becomes something beautiful, fantastical, and truly unnerving. New York Premiere
Sunday, July 16, 5:00pm

An Evening with Bob Balaban
Parents
Bob Balaban, Canada/USA, 1989, 35mm, 82m
As supremely black as a comedy can be, Bob Balaban’s brilliantly subversive feature directorial debut is deranged in all the right ways. Ten-year-old Michael, a socially awkward only child living in 1950s suburbia with his doting mom and emotionally abusive dad (Mary Beth Hurt and Randy Quaid, both great), is plagued by bizarre nightmares—which are about as terrifying as his reality: he suspects his picture-perfect parents to be cannibalistic, while not having a taste for meat himself. Recently relocated to a new town, Michael finds comfort in school through an equally oddball friend, who claims she’s from the moon, while figuring out how to survive his home life, and more specifically mealtime. You’ll never think of “leftovers” in the same way.
Monday, July 17, 7:00pm (Q&A with Bob Balaban)

My Boyfriend’s Back
Bob Balaban, USA, 1993, 35mm, 85m
At the start of this horror-comedy for the highest of lowbrow tastes—produced by Sean S. Cunningham, written by Dean Lorey (who went on to Arrested Development), and directed by the great comic actor Bob Balaban—geeky teen protagonist Johnny Dingle (Andrew Lowery) announces in voiceover: “This day was the beginning of the end of my life.” And, yes, after a severely botched attempt to play hero for Missy (Traci Lind), the girl he has forever lusted after, he gets shot by a masked robber at the deli where she works, but not before making his dying request that she go to the prom with him. When she says yes, he will do whatever it takes to make that a reality—decomposing body be damned!—much to the annoyance of Missy’s jock boyfriend (Matthew Fox) and his bullyish sidekick (Philip Seymour Hoffman), who nicknames Johnny “Dead Boy.” Unfairly maligned by many, this film is a delight due for a serious revisiting.
Monday, July 17, 9:30pm (Introduction by Bob Balaban)

Frogs
George McCowan, USA, 1972, 35mm, 90m
It’s Jason Crockett’s birthday weekend and a group of family members have assembled on his Florida island plantation to celebrate. Environmentally unfriendly, the cranky, wheelchair-bound old man (Ray Milland) finds the growing masses of frogs inhabiting his space to be a menace and has no second thoughts about poisoning the waters to get rid of them. So when “nature” begins taking revenge, it’s easy to root against “man,” even if Crockett’s guests, as well as a photographer researching the area (played by a totally hunky Sam Elliott, in one of his first screen appearances), are unfairly caught in the path of destruction. Despite the film’s ludicrously misleading title—the killer creatures featured actually encompass a wide range from mainly toads to snakes, turtles, spiders, gators, and beyond—the gloriously campy B-movie provides a darn good creepy-crawly time.
Sunday, July 16, 1:00pm

Happy Birthday to Me
Lee Thompson, Canada, 1981, 35mm, 111m
Recovering from a highly traumatic event that took place around the time of her birthday many years past, pretty and popular Virginia (Melissa Sue Anderson) appears to have made some real progress. But as she approaches her 18th year, there’s a black-leather-gloved killer on the loose, knocking off her elite-private-school friends, which brings her stability into question. Giallo-like in its plot convolutions as well as its stark, shadowy visual style, this rare foray into strict horror by dark crime thriller master J. Lee Thompson is perhaps best known for its infamous shish-kebab murder scene, but the underappreciated slasher film has much more to offer, with a whole slew of show-stopping death set pieces and a stellar supporting cast, including Glenn Ford as Virginia’s doctor.
Saturday, July 15, 1:00pm

Killer Party
William Fruet, USA/Canada, 1986, 35mm, 91m
In 1986, a pair of April Fool’s Day–themed horror-comedies opened in theaters. The wider release of the two, April Fool’s Day, was a hit and remains a genre favorite, while the other was overlooked and lives in semi-obscurity. But today, Killer Party looks better than ever. It kicks off with a clever, awesomely cheesy pre-credits prologue that sums up the ’80s in just under 10 minutes, before shifting the focus to a group of friends eager to join a sorority, who prepare for a raging initiation party at a long-off-limits—for good reason!—frat house. Twenty-four hours of gags, hazing rituals, and demonic possessions ensue in this genuine treat of a slasher film—no surprise coming from William Fruet, the director responsible for The House by the Lake, Spasms, and Funeral Home.
Sunday, July 16, 3:00pm

Killing Ground
Damien Power, Australia, 2016, 89m
The story starts like so many others: a couple are en route to a campsite. But unlike most survival thrillers, instead of the standard idiotic chatter, the relaxation-seekers here actually engage in intelligent conversation—revealing right away that this isn’t going to be the usual ride. On arrival, they find an eerily empty tent pitched nearby, its presence casting a dark shadow over their lovely spot as well as a sense of mystery about the whereabouts of its inhabitants. And as the action progresses, with an intriguing turn of the cinematic clock we begin to go back and forth in time so it can be revealed what happened to the other family—made up of a mom, dad, teenage daughter, and little baby. Expertly constructed and strongly acted—the two sadistic villains are truly skin-crawling and their prey authentic and sympathetic—Damien Power’s feature debut is at times excruciatingly cruel, yet always positively stunning. An IFC Midnight release.
Saturday, July 15, 7:15pm (Q&A with Damien Power)

The Limehouse Golem
Juan Carlos Medina, UK, 2016, 105m
In Victorian London, Scotland Yard inspector John Kildare (a great Bill Nighy, in a role originally meant for Alan Rickman, to whom the film is dedicated) takes a special interest in the well-being of Lizzie Cree (Olivia Cooke), a young stage performer accused of murdering her husband. She seems an unlikely killer and he becomes obsessed with proving her innocence, all while the title “monster” is leaving behind a string of mutilated corpses à la Jack the Ripper—a case that may just be connected to Lizzie’s. This jam-packed, handsome, highly literate film—adapted from Peter Ackroyd’s 1994 novel Dan Leno & the Limehouse Golem and featuring real-life historical figures (such as Karl Marx, novelist George Gissing, and theater actor Dan Leno) woven into the fictional narrative—satisfies as a gothic murder mystery and an inside look into the lively world of the music halls so popular at the time, while also offering its fair share of bloodletting. An RLJ Entertainment release. U.S. Premiere
Saturday, July 15, 5:00pm

The Night of the Virgin / La noche del virgen
Roberto San Sebastián, Spain, 2016, 117m
Spanish with English subtitles
Every developing boy has sex on the brain and his “first time” is a momentous occasion. So when a sexy older woman at a New Year’s Eve party shows interest in Nico, an awkward and unfortunate-looking late bloomer at 20, the offer to go home with her is one he can’t refuse. That her name is Medea is only the first of many red flags, and it becomes rapidly clear that Nico would have been way better off holding on to his virginity a bit longer. The insanity that unfolds that evening in Medea’s cockroach-infested apartment is better witnessed than described, because nobody would believe the half of it. Audacious, inventive (featuring some spectacular practical effects), sometimes hilarious and jaw-droppingly disgusting, and always totally bonkers, the film has more on its mind than pure gross-out—though it succeeds in that too. In any case, we promise you have never seen anything like it… New York Premiere
Tuesday, July 18, 9:00pm

Offensive
Jon Ford, UK, 2016, 105m
After his father passes away, Bernard (Russell Floyd) inherits a sprawling home in the French countryside—but on the condition that he and his wife Helen (Lisa Eichhorn) actually live there for a designated period of time. The retired urbanites decide that a more idyllic existence might do them some good, but sadly it’s not peace that awaits them, as a pack of barbaric local teens promptly begin tormenting them. With no one to turn to (the neighbors are all terrified and the cops corrupt) a war rages between the feral youth and the more civilized older folks as they’re pushed to their limits. Rough and raw (visually as well as thematically), the ultra-tense film is painfully cruel yet purely satisfying, and, with the introduction of some revelations about Bernard’s father, it also serves as an intriguing exploration of three generations of violence. New York Premiere
Sunday, July 16, 9:00pm

Phobia
Pavan Kirpalani, India, 2016, 111m
Hindi with English subtitles
Mehak (Radhika Apte) is a talented, vivacious painter, but after a horrific attack she becomes afflicted with post-traumatic agoraphobia. Her condition overwhelms her sister Anusha’s hospitality and sympathy when it starts affecting her young nephew, and she soon finds herself living alone in an apartment lent to her by an old friend. She’s too afraid to even approach the door and unwilling to accept anyone’s offers for help, while strange neighbors and even stranger images begin to appear before her. And as the hallucinations become increasingly violent, she falls deeper and deeper into madness. Or is she in fact haunted? Are those severed fingers real? Phobia is the strongest Hindi horror outing in ages, anchored by a fiery performance by Apte, who absolutely rivets the screen. North American Premiere
Saturday, July 15, 9:30pm

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Comment, the U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from The New York Times, Shutterstock, Variety, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. American Airlines is the Official Airline of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. For more information, visit www.filmlinc.org and follow @filmlinc on Twitter.

June 30, 2017 Posted by | avant-garde, CULTURE, FILM, HOLIDAY GUIDES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , | Leave a comment

FILM/FESTIVALS — New York Asian Film Festival Returns 6/30 -7/16/17 *NYC

FSLC and Subway Cinema announce New York Asian Film Festival, June 30 – July 16

 

 

Jane © House in Seoul All Rights Reserved Courtesy of M-Line Distribution

The Film Society of Lincoln Center and Subway Cinema announced the complete lineup for the 16th New York Asian Film Festival (NYAFF), which will take place from June 30 to July 13 at the Film Society and July 14 to 16 at the SVA Theatre. North America’s leading festival of popular Asian cinema will showcase 56 feature films, including 3 International Premieres, 21 North American Premieres, 4 U.S. Premieres, and 15 films making their New York City debuts. The festival will feature in-person appearances by more than 20 international filmmakers and celebrity guests from mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, and Southeast Asia.

Birdshot_1

This year, all three of NYAFF’s Gala screenings are brilliant reinventions of the thriller genre. The Opening Gala will be the International Premiere of Nattawut Poonpiriya’s Bad Genius, the first Southeast Asian film to open the festival, with the director and stars in attendance. In this exhilarating high-school thriller, straight-A students Lynn (Chutimon Chuengcharoensukying) and Bank (Chanon Santinatornkul) stage a heist that will undermine the U.S. university entrance system after they lose their own scholarships. The Centerpiece Gala of the festival will be the North American Premiere of Mikhail Red’s Birdshot, a continuation of the festival programmers’ efforts to champion films from Southeast Asia, and the Philippines in particular. The Closing Gala is the U.S. Premiere of Jung Byung-gil’s The Villainess, fresh from its Midnight screening in Cannes. The adrenaline-soaked action film stars Kim Ok-vin as a ruthless female assassin trained in China who starts a new life with South Korea’s Intelligence Agency.

Bamseom Pirates Seoul Inferno © OPOT Pictures; Courtesy of M-Line Distribution

New to NYAFF in 2017 is the Main Competition section, featuring seven diverse works by first or second-time directors that are all having their North American premieres at the festival. Competing are Bad Genius (Thailand), Birdshot (Philippines), A Double Life (Japan), The Gangster’s Daughter (Taiwan), Kfc (Vietnam), Jane (South Korea), and With Prisoners (Hong Kong). The competition jury will be announced at a later date, with winners revealed on the festival’s final night at Film Society of Lincoln Center on July 13.

Mad World

“We were seeking a range of original films from first-time directors, films that represent the diversity of filmmaking from Asia, stories that say something both very local and specific to their countries of origin and something very universal: we hope we achieved at least some of this with our inaugural competition selection, which includes films from seven countries/cities in the region in a broad variety of genres,” NYAFF executive director Samuel Jamier said. “It’s important for us to champion new filmmaking from Asia, and the diversity of film made there at a time when other festivals in North America seem to be reducing the size of their Asian lineups.”

Vanishing Time © Showbox

More now than ever, Hong Kong cinema is at the core of the festival’s programming: faithful to its Chinatown origins, this year’s edition celebrates the best filmmaking from the Special Administrative Region with a central Hong Kong Panorama section, commemorating the 20th anniversary of its establishment, with major support from the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office in New York. Over the past two decades, Hong Kong cinema has continuously influenced and inspired many filmmakers in Asia and in the world. This year’s lineup proves the originality and excellence of its production is intact: from a powerful condemnation of life inside the territory’s juvenile detention centers (With Prisoners), to a tale of corruption and redemption set in the underbelly of 1960s Hong Kong (Dealer/Healer), the films bear testimony to the city’s rich cinema history.

Dealer Healer © Sil-Metropole Organisation

The core of the panorama will be a special (and first of its kind) focus on the exciting new generation of directors, titled Young Blood Hong Kong. As part of the 20th anniversary, the festival is looking to the future of Hong Kong cinema, rather than its past: these recent Hong Kong directors are working in various genres, tackling a range of social issues, and paying homage to the film traditions they grew up with, from tenement dramas to vampire comedies. Meanwhile, NYAFF continues to bring established, major filmmakers from the region: Lawrence Lau, who, along with Ann Hui, is one of Hong Kong’s best neorealist directors, will be introducing his star-studded crime action drama Dealer/Healer; the Panorama will spotlight the new generation from the region with guest filmmaker Wong Chun and screenwriter Florence Chan with Mad World, Derek Hui with This Is Not What I Expected, and Alan Lo with Zombiology: Enjoy Yourself Tonight. Other films by first-time Hong Kong directors in this year’s lineup are Derek Tsang’s Soul Mate, Yan Pak-wing and Chiu Sin-hang’s Vampire Cleanup Department, and Andrew Wong’s With Prisoners.

Extraordinary Mission 4

The 2017 lineup also includes five LGBTQ-themed films: two dramas with transsexual protagonists, Naoko Ogigami’s Close-Knit from Japan, and Cho Hyun-hoon’s drama Jane from South Korea; two coming-of-age high-school youth dramas, Ahn Jung-min’s Fantasy of the Girls from South Korea, and Leste Chen’s 2006 Eternal Summer from Taiwan, which merits a second look a decade on; and Lee Sang-il’s wild and violent mystery thriller Rage, featuring Go Ayano (NYAFF 2016 Rising Star Asia awardee) as a homeless stranger invited into the home of a semi-closeted salaryman (Satoshi Tsumabuki) as his live-in-lover.

The Villainess - Courtesy of Well Go USA

Another highlight of this year’s festival are three films that celebrate Japan’s unique “Roman Porno” genre, each having their North American premieres: Aroused by Gymnopedies, Dawn of the Felines, and Wet Woman in the Wind. Nikkatsu, Japan’s oldest film studio, is celebrating 45 years since they birthed the softcore Roman Porno genre (roman derives from the French word for novel). Invented to save a dying industry, they gave carte blanche to directors with minimal rules: keep it under 80 minutes with a sex scene every ten. This allowed for wild stream of consciousness works of both the highest and lowest caliber. Now, Nikkatsu has enlisted top contemporary talent for the Roman Porno Reboot Project, with these three filmmakers taking the provocative, envelope-pushing format to a whole new level.

Bad Genius © GDH 559

In addition to the festival’s screenings, the NYAFF awards a number of honorees each year, including this year’s recipients:

  • The 2017 NYAFF Lifetime Achievement Award goes to veteran Hong Kong actor Tony Leung Ka-fai, who will attend a three-film tribute, including Johnnie To’s Election, Longman Leung & Sunny Luk’s Cold War 2 and Tsui’s Hark’s The Taking of Tiger Mountain 3D. In a career spanning 35 years, Leung has worked with the iconic directors Li Han-hsiang, Wong Kar-wai, Stanley Kwan, and Jean-Jacques Annaud, and starred opposite the screen legends Jackie Chan, Leslie Cheung, Maggie Cheung, Andy Lau, Jet Li, and Fan Bingbing. Leung was arguably the first Hong Kong star to become an international heartthrob, in Jean-Jacques Annaud’s The Lover.
  • Our Star Asia Award recipient is Korean movie star Gang Dong-won, whose charisma and emotional investment in his performances gives his films a unique edge. His most iconic films include Lee Myung-se’s Duelist, Park Jin-pyo’s Voice of a Murderer, and Jang Hoon’s Secret Reunion. Last year, NYAFF presented two of his films, The Priests and A Violent Prosecutor, and in 2017, the festival will be joined by Gang to present a special screening of the magical fable Vanishing Time: A Boy Who Returned.

A Quiet Dream ©

  • The Screen International Rising Star Asia Award will be given to Thailand’s Chutimon “Aokbab” Chuengcharoensukying. The 21-year-old model, who is still a student at Bangkok’s Chulalongkorn University, found fame last year in Thank You for Sharing, an eight-minute, viral short about cyber-bullying. The NYAFF is opening with her feature debut, Bad Genius, in which she stars as a high-school student who masterminds an ambitious heist of the American university entrance exam system. It’s a demanding role, in which her quick-witted character must navigate a complex moral universe where parents and teachers don’t always know best.

Tickets go on sale June 15, with Film Society and Subway Cinema members receiving an early access period beginning June 13. Tickets are $14; $11 for students and seniors (62+); and $9 for Film Society members. See more and save with a 3+ film discount package and All Access Pass. Learn more at filmlinc.org.

Credits:
Curated by executive director Samuel Jamier, deputy director Stephen Cremin, and programmers Claire Marty and David Wilentz.

The New York Asian Film Festival is co-presented by Subway Cinema and the Film Society of Lincoln Center and takes place from June 30 to July 13 at Film Society’s Walter Reade Theater (165 West 65th St), and July 14 to 16 at SVA Theatre (333 West 23rd St).

Keep up to date with information at www.filmlinc.org and www.subwaycinema.com.  Subway Cinema can be followed on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nyaff and Twitter at www.twitter.com/subwaycinema.

FULL LINEUP (57):
Titles in bold are included in the Main Competition

CHINA (6):
Co-presented with Confucius Institute Headquarters and China Institute
 Battle of Memories (Leste Chen, 2017)
 Blood of Youth (Yang Shupeng, 2016)
 Duckweed (Han Han, 2017)
 Extraordinary Mission (Alan Mak & Anthony Pun, 2017)
 Someone to Talk to (Liu Yulin, 2016)
 Soul on a String (Zhang Yang, 2016)

HONG KONG PANORAMA (10):
Presented with the support of Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office in New York
 Cold War 2 (Longman Leung, Sunny Luk, 2016)
 Dealer/Healer (Lawrence Lau, 2017)
 Election (Johnnie To, 2005)
 Mad World (Wong Chun, 2016)
 Soul Mate (Derek Tsang, 2016)
 The Taking of Tiger Mountain (Tsui Hark, 2014)
 This Is Not What I Expected (Derek Hui, 2017)
 Vampire Cleanup Department (Yan Pak-wing, Chiu Sin-hang, 2017)
 With Prisoners (Andrew Wong, 2017)
 Zombiology: Enjoy Yourself Tonight (Alan Lo, 2017)

JAPAN (15):
 Aroused by Gymnopedies (Isao Yukisada, 2016)
 Close-Knit (Naoko Ogigami, 2017)
 Dawn of the Felines (Kazuya Shiraishi, 2016)
 Destruction Babies (Tetsuya Mariko, 2016)
 A Double Life (Yoshiyuki Kishi, 2016)
 Happiness (Sabu, 2016)
 Japanese Girls Never Die (Daigo Matsui, 2016)
 The Long Excuse (Miwa Nishikawa, 2016)
 Love and Other Cults (Eiji Uchida, 2017)
 The Mole Song: Hong Kong Capriccio (Takashi Miike, 2016)
 Rage (Lee Sang-il, 2016)
 Suffering of Ninko (Norihiro Niwatsukino, 2016)
 Survival Family (Shinobu Yaguchi, 2017)
 Traces of Sin (Kei Ishikawa, 2016)
 Wet Woman in the Wind (Akihiro Shiota, 2016)

SOUTH KOREA (11):
Presented with the support of Korean Cultural Center New York
 Fabricated City (Park Kwang-hyun, 2017)
 Fantasy of the Girls (Ahn Jung-min, 2016)
 Jane (Cho Hyun-hoon, 2016)
 Ordinary Person (Kim Bong-han, 2017)
 A Quiet Dream (Zhang Lu, 2016)
 A Single Rider (Lee Joo-young, 2017)
 Split (Choi Kook-hee, 2016)
 The Tooth and the Nail (Jung Sik, Kim Whee, 2017)
 The Truth Beneath (Lee Kyoung-mi, 2016)
 Vanishing Time: A Boy Who Returned (Uhm Tae-hwa, 2016)
 The Villainess (Jung Byung-gil, 2017)

SOUTHEAST ASIA (6)
 Bad Genius (Nattawut Poonpiriya, Thailand, 2017)
 Birdshot (Mikhail Red, Philippines, 2016)
 Kfc (Le Binh Giang, Vietnam, 2017)
 Mrs. K (Ho Yuhang, Malaysia, 2016)
 Saving Sally (Avid Liongoren, Philippines, 2016)
 Town in a Lake (Jet Leyco, Philippines, 2015)

TAIWAN (6):
Presented with the support of the Taipei Cultural Center of TECO in New York
 Eternal Summer (Leste Chen, 2006)
 The Gangster’s Daughter (Chen Mei-juin, 2017)
 Godspeed (Chung Mong-hong, 2016)
 Mon Mon Mon Monsters (Giddens, 2017)
 The Road to Mandalay (Midi Z, 2016)
 The Village of No Return (Chen Yu-hsun, 2017)

DOCUMENTARIES (2)
 Bamseom Pirates Seoul Inferno (Jung Yoon-suk, 2017)
 Mrs. B., A North Korean Woman (Jero Yun, 2016)

NYAFF TEASER:
https://youtu.be/Hw-mCSel3N4

OFFICIAL POSTER:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B–YOkNIV_ZhTjdqNjRVMm9IU00/view?ts=5931c144

 

NEW YORK ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL (NYAFF)
Now in its 16th year, the New York Asian Film Festival (NYAFF) is North America’s leading festival of popular Asian cinema, which The Village Voice has called “the best film festival in New York,” and The New York Times has called “one of the city’s most valuable events.” Launched in 2002 by Subway Cinema, the festival selects only the best, strangest, and most entertaining movies to screen for New York audiences, ranging from mainstream blockbusters and art-house eccentricities to genre and cult classics. It was the first North American film festival to champion the works of Johnnie To, Bong Joon-ho, Park Chan-wook, Takashi Miike, and other auteurs of contemporary Asian cinema. Since 2010, it has been produced in collaboration with the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Comment, the U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from The New York Times, Shutterstock, Variety, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. American Airlines is the Official Airline of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. For more information, visit www.filmlinc.org and follow @filmlinc on Twitter.

ABOUT SUBWAY CINEMA
Subway Cinema is America’s leading 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to the exhibition and appreciation of Asian popular film culture in all forms, building bridges between Asia and the West. With year-round festivals and programs, the organization aims to bring wide audience and critical attention to contemporary and classic Asian cinema in the U.S. In 2002, Subway Cinema launched its flagship event, the annual New York Asian Film Festival (NYAFF), which is North America’s leading festival of popular Asian cinema. Subway cinema’s other events and initiatives include Old School Kung Fu Fest (OSKFF).

For more information, visit www.subwaycinema.com, www.facebook.com/NYAFF, and follow @subwaycinema on Twitter (#nyaff16).

Subway Cinema receives generous, year-round support from the Kenneth A. Cowin Foundation and sponsorships from the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office in New York, Korean Cultural Center New York, Taipei Cultural Center of TECO in New York, China Institute, Manhattan Portage, Tsingtao Beer, Japan Foundation New York, Maven Wine, Bruce R. Watts, and thanks their media partners: Screen International, Asian Crush, China Film Insider, Chopsticks NY

June 22, 2017 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

FILM – FSLC and UniFrance announce complete lineup for Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, March 1-12

FSLC and UniFrance announce complete lineup for Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, March 1-12

The Film Society of Lincoln Center and UniFrance announce the complete lineup for the 22nd edition of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, the celebrated annual series showcasing the variety and vitality of contemporary French filmmaking, March 1-12.

The lineup features 23 diverse films, comprised of highlights from international festivals and works by both established favorites and talented newcomers, including François Ozon’s Lubitsch adaptation Frantz, set after World War I; Bertrand Bonello’s Nocturama, a provocative exploration of a Paris terrorist attack carried out by young activists; Bruno Dumont’s oddball slapstick detective story Slack Bay, starring Juliette Binoche; Rebecca Zlotowski’s visually arresting Planetarium, with Natalie Portman as a touring psychic who catches the eye of a movie producer in 1930s Paris; Jean-Stéphane Bron’s The Paris Opera, a documentary that peeks behind the scenes of the famed institution; and, for the first time, a Film Comment magazine presentation within Rendez-Vous with French Cinema: Julia Ducournau’s cannibal thriller Raw, which titillated audiences at Toronto and Cannes.

This year’s programming, including the selected films, panels, and events, includes a special focus on the myriad of ways that French culture influences the arts in America, and vice-versa. As previously announced, the Opening Night selection is the North American premiere of Étienne Comar’s Django, starring Reda Kateb as the legendary jazz musician and Cécile de France, and the Closing Night selection is the U.S. premiere of Jérôme Salle’s The Odyssey, with Lambert Wilson as explorer Jacques Cousteau and co-starring Audrey Tautou and Pierre Niney.

Selections in this year’s edition of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema garnered an impressive 47 combined nominations for this year’s César Awards, which were announced last week. Best Film nominees include Frantz (eleven nominations), Slack Bay (nine nominations), Nicole Garcia’s Marion Cotillard showcase From the Land of the Moon (eight nominations), and Justine Triet’s offbeat rom-com In Bed with Victoria (five nominations). In addition, Emmanuelle Bercot’s gripping real-life drama 150 Milligrams, with Sidse Babett Knudsen as a doctor who challenged the French pharmaceutical industry, received nominations for adapted screenplay and Best Actress; up-and-coming filmmaker Stephanie de Giusto was nominated for Best First Film for The Dancer, which stars Soko as modern dance icon Loïe Fuller and Lily-Rose Depp as Isadora Duncan (both nominated); and additional nominations went to Sébastien Marnier’s Faultless, Katell Quillévéré’s Heal the Living, Sólveig Anspach’s The Together Project, and Salle’s The Odyssey.

Filmmakers and talent who will be in attendance at this year’s festival include, in alphabetical order: Emmanuelle Bercot, Bertrand Bonello, Étienne Comar, Caroline Deruas, Stéphanie Di Giusto, Julia Ducournau, Marc Fitoussi, Marina Foïs, Cécile de France, Nicole Garcia, Christophe Honoré, Reda Kateb, Sébastien Marnier, François Ozon, Antonin Peretjatko, Katell Quillévéré, Jérôme Salle, Justin Taurand, Justine Triet, Martin Wheeler, and Rebecca Zlotowski.

The 2017 edition of Rendez-Vous also features a number of special events, headlined by an intimate discussion with Agnès Varda on March 10 and a free public screening of an episode of the hit French TV series Call My Agent! on March 11. Free talks will include a panel on the many ways that film can function as political intervention; a conversation with French and American film producers about international co-producing; and the festival’s annual panel featuring French Touch musicians and film composers. A special exhibition imported from the esteemed photography festival Les Rencontres d’Arles will be on view in the Walter Reade Theater’s Furman Gallery throughout the festival, displaying newly discovered color photos from behind the scenes of Fellini’s black-and-white masterpiece 8 1/2, shot by the late Paul Ronald and accompanied by recollections from the film’s co-star Anouk Aimée.

Co-presented with UniFrance, Rendez-Vous with French Cinema demonstrates annually that the landscape of French cinema is as fertile, inspiring, and distinct as ever. Press screenings will take place February 15-22 and will be announced in the coming weeks.

Artistic direction: Florence Almozini and Dennis Lim

The 22nd edition of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema benefits from the support of CNC, the Ministry of Culture and Communication, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development, PROCIREP, Renault Nissan, Lacoste, TV5 Monde, Cultural Services of the French Embassy, Sacem, FIAF, Blum & Poe, and The ENGIE Foundation.

Tickets go on sale Thursday, February 16, with early access for Film Society members beginning Tuesday, February 14. Tickets are $16; $12 for seniors (62+); and $10 for students and members; Opening Night tickets are $25; $20 for members, seniors, and students. Learn more at filmlinc.org.

FILMS & DESCRIPTIONS
All films are screened digitally at the Walter Reade Theater (165 W. 65th St.) unless otherwise noted

MAIN SLATE

Opening Night:
Django
Étienne Comar, France, 2017, 115m
French with English subtitles
North American Premiere
The world of legendary Romani jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt is brought to vivid life in this riveting saga of survival, resistance, and artistic courage. Reinhardt (Reda Kateb) is the toast of 1943 Paris, thrilling audiences with his distinctive brand of “hot jazz” and charming his admirers (including an intrepid friend and muse played by Cécile de France). But even as the rise of Nazism and anti-Romani sentiment force Reinhardt—whose music is considered degenerate under the Third Reich—to make a daring escape from the city, he refuses to be silenced, his music becoming his form of protest. The feature debut from acclaimed screenwriter Étienne Comar (Of Gods and Men) immerses viewers in a tumultuous chapter in the life of one of the 20th century’s greatest musical geniuses.
Wednesday, March 1, 6:00pm and 8:30pm (Étienne Comar, Reda Kateb, and Cécile de France in person)

Closing Night:
The Odyssey / L’odyssée
Jérôme Salle, France, 2016, 122m
French with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere
Lambert Wilson is magnetic in this grandly lyrical dramatization of legendary explorer-turned-filmmaker Jacques Cousteau. Spanning half a century and criss-crossing oceans, the film charts Cousteau’s professional triumphs and personal failures as he achieves renown for the underwater documentaries he produced on his oceanographic expeditions, amid the constant struggle to secure financial backing for increasingly ambitious scientific (and cinematic) objectives. Set against the backdrop of cross-generational family drama—centered on his long-suffering wife Simone (Audrey Tautou) and his talented, deeply conflicted son Philippe (Pierre Niney)—The Odyssey is an epic ode to scientific exploration and documentary filmmaking, and a celebration of the human drive to seek out new realms of discovery.
Saturday, March 11, 6:00pm (Q&A with Jérôme Salle)
Sunday, March 12, 8:00pm

150 Milligrams / La fille de Brest
Emmanuelle Bercot, France, 2016, 128m
French with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere
A fearless everywoman stands up to a drug company in this gripping David vs. Goliath story, based on a real-life medical scandal. Irène Frachon (Sidse Babett Knudsen) is a pulmonologist at a hospital in Brest who begins digging into the connection between a widely prescribed diabetes drug and a spate of fatal valve disorders, with help from a research scientist (Benoît Magimel). Soon enough, Irène sets off a media firestorm, making powerful enemies in the pharmaceutical industry who will stop at nothing to suppress her story. Knudsen and writer-director Emmanuelle Bercot have created a memorably eccentric heroine, at once a tireless crusader and compelling human.
Saturday, March 4, 3:15pm (Q&A with Emmanuelle Bercot)
Monday, March 6, 4:15pm

The Dancer / La danseuse
Stéphanie Di Giusto, France/Belgium/Czech Republic, 2016, 108m
English and French with English subtitles
This visually sumptuous drama set amidst the opulence of La Belle Époque Paris charts the real-life saga of modern dance icon Loïe Fuller (Soko). Raised on the plains of the American Midwest, Fuller became the unlikely toast of turn-of-the-century France with her legendary performances, in which swirling swaths of silk fabric and dazzlingly colored lights created a kaleidoscopic spectacle of color and movement. Boasting lavish period detail, breathtaking dance sequences, and fiercely committed performances by Gaspard Ulliel, Mélanie Thierry, and Lily-Rose Depp as Fuller’s rival Isadora Duncan, The Dancer is an arresting chronicle of an artist’s struggle to realize her vision.
Thursday, March 2, 1:45pm
Monday, March 6, 9:30pm (Q&A with Stéphanie Di Giusto)

Daydreams / L’indomptée
Caroline Deruas, France, 2016, 98m
French and Italian with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere
Past and present, fantasy and reality collide in the boldly original feature debut from Caroline Deruas. A group of young French artists converge at Rome’s sun-dappled Villa Medicis for a one-year residency. Among them are Camille (Clotilde Hesme), a writer whose marriage to a famous novelist (Tchéky Karyo) is disintegrating, and Axèle (Jenna Thiam), an erratic photographer haunted by spectral visions of the villa’s past. Deruas conjures a subtly surreal atmosphere through striking stylistic flourishes—iris shots, color effects, dream sequences—in this beguiling tale of creative struggle, romantic rivalry, and ghosts.
Wednesday, March 8, 4:30pm
Friday, March 10, 6:45pm (Q&A with Caroline Deruas)

Faultless / Irréprochable
Sébastien Marnier, France, 2016, 103m
French with English subtitles
Out of money and options, 40-year-old Constance (Marina Foïs) abandons her life in Paris and returns to her suburban hometown in hopes of picking up where she left off. After she finds no real romance from her occasional lover (Benjamin Biolay), something finally snaps when she discovers that her old job as a real-estate agent has been given to a younger woman (Joséphine Japy). It soon becomes clear: Constance is dangerous, and will stop at nothing to get what she wants. Both a wild-ride thriller and a chilling character study, Faultless is driven by a riveting central performance: almost always onscreen, Foïs brings unexpected depth and poignant humanity to her portrayal of a coldly calculating sociopath.
Sunday, March 5, 6:15pm (Q&A with Sébastien Marnier and Marina Foïs)
Monday, March 6, 2:00pm

Frantz
François Ozon, France/Germany, 2016, 113m
French and German with English subtitles
The new film from acclaimed director François Ozon is a sublime, heartrending saga of guilt, forgiveness, and forbidden love in post–World War I Europe. Based on Ernst Lubitsch’s 1932 antiwar drama Broken Lullaby, it charts the complex bond that forms between two strangers: Anna (Paula Beer), a young German woman grieving the loss of her fiancé, Frantz, in the war, and Adrien (Pierre Niney), a former French soldier. What plays out between them is a haunting investigation of postwar trauma and healing rendered in gorgeous black-and-white that occasionally gives way—gloriously—to psychologically charged bursts of color. A Music Box Films release.
Thursday, March 2, 9:15pm (Q&A with François Ozon)
Saturday, March 11, 1:00pm

From the Land of the Moon / Mal de pierres
Nicole Garcia, France/Belgium/Canada, 2016, 116m
French and Spanish with English subtitles
Marion Cotillard delivers a performance of searing emotional intensity in this psychologically charged, 1950s-set saga of amour fou. She stars as Gabrielle, a troubled young woman—sick in both body and mind—who is stuck in a loveless marriage. When she travels to Switzerland for a rest cure, she meets the handsome, terminally ill lieutenant André (Louis Garrel), beginning a decades-long romantic obsession that will shape the course of her life. Beautifully photographed in the sunny south of France and the snow-capped Swiss mountains, From the Land of the Moon is an exquisite showcase for one of the finest actresses working today. A Sundance Selects release.
Friday, March 3, 6:30pm (Q&A with Nicole Garcia)
Sunday, March 12, 1:00pm

Heal the Living / Réparer les vivants
Katell Quillévéré, France/Belgium, 2016, 103m
French with English subtitles
A medical drama of unusual depth and sensitivity, Heal the Living charts the disparate lives touched by a tragedy. Following a car accident, 17-year-old Simon (Gabin Verdet) is left brain-dead, setting into motion a chain of events that affects everyone from his family to the hospital staff to a mother of two (Anne Dorval) in need of a heart transplant. Director Katell Quillévéré weaves together the multistrand narrative with consummate grace, abetted by a remarkable ensemble cast (including Emmanuelle Seigner and Tahar Rahim), elegant camerawork, and a striking score by Alexandre Desplat. The result is an enormously affecting study of human interconnectedness that finds a silver lining of hope in a wrenching situation. A Cohen Media Group release.
Thursday, March 2, 6:30pm (Q&A with Katell Quillévéré)
Friday, March 3, 1:45pm

In Bed With Victoria / Victoria
Justine Triet, France, 2016, 97m
English and French with English subtitles
Victoria (Virginie Efira) is a hotshot lawyer with a disastrous personal life. Between juggling a demanding job, raising two kids, and fending off an ex-husband who’s slandering her on the Internet, she can barely be bothered with the hit-or-miss (mostly miss) online hookups she sets up. Around the time Victoria agrees to help her old friend Vincent (Melvil Poupaud) with a decidedly bizarre legal matter, she runs into a charming former client Sam (Vincent Lacoste). Now that a shot at real romance comes along, will the perpetually harried Victoria even recognize it? This refreshingly offbeat (how else to describe a film that features a trial in which the star witness is a Dalmatian?) farce is propelled by Efira’s irresistible performance as a heroine who’s raw, real, and complicated in ways that transcend the rom-com formula.
Saturday, March 4, 9:30pm (Q&A with Justine Triet)
Sunday, March 12, 3:30pm

In the Forest of Siberia / Dans les forêts de Sibérie
Safy Nebbou, France, 2016, 105m
English, French, and Russian with English subtitles
Based on the award-winning memoir by adventurer Sylvain Tesson, this tale of survival follows Teddy (Raphaël Personnaz), a young Frenchman who leaves everything behind to live in isolation in the icy Siberian taiga. But initial exhilaration soon gives way to the harsh reality of staying alive in a frozen wilderness miles from civilization with roaming bears, life-threatening blizzards, and no electricity. The film captures majestic footage of the unspoiled Siberian landscape, its bleak beauty underscored by jazz trumpeter Ibrahim Maalouf’s plaintive soundtrack.
Sunday, March 5, 1:00pm
Thursday, March 9, 4:00pm

Journey to Greenland / Le Voyage au Groënland
Sébastien Betbeder, France, 2016, 98m
English, Inuktitut, and French with English subtitles
Scruffy, thirtysomething best friends both named Thomas (Thomas Blanchard and Thomas Scimeca) leave behind their struggling acting careers in Paris for an extended sojourn in a remote, snowbound stretch of Greenland. One is there to reconnect with his off-the-grid father, the other for adventure. What ensues is a perceptive, warm-spirited study of cross-cultural misunderstanding and connection, as the two men learn to survive in a place without alcohol, indoor plumbing, or a reliable Internet connection. Director Sébastien Betbeder balances wry, unforced comedy with casual insight into human relationships: between friends, family members, and the strangers who touch your life. A Netflix release.
Tuesday, March 7, 4:30pm
Wednesday, March 8, 6:45pm

Mum’s Wrong / Maman a tort
Marc Fitoussi, France/Belgium, 2016, 110m
French with English subtitles
When idealistic 14-year-old Anouk (Jeanne Jestin) embarks on a weeklong internship at her mom’s insurance company, she gets a crash course in the less-than-rosy reality of the corporate world, discovering some unsavory truths about her own mother along the way. An emotionally complex look at parents, children, and the moral compromises we make, Mum’s Wrong adroitly blends workplace satire with a compassionate social-issue message, while its leads Jestin and Émilie Dequenne (Rosetta, Our Children) create a nuanced, wholly believable portrait of a mother-daughter relationship undergoing a crisis.
Sunday, March 5, 3:30pm (Q&A with Marc Fitoussi)
Friday, March 10, 2:00pm

Nocturama
Bertrand Bonello, France/Germany/Belgium, 2016, 130m
French with English subtitles
The audacious new film from Bertrand Bonello (Saint Laurent) unfolds in two mesmerizing segments. The first is a precision-crafted thriller, following a multi-ethnic group of millennial radicals as they carry out a mass-scale terrorist attack on Paris. The second—in which the perpetrators hide out in the consumerist mecca of a luxury department store—is the director’s coup, raising provocative questions about everything that came before. Bonello stages his apocalyptic vision with stylishly roving camerawork, blasts of hip-hop, and a lip-synced performance to Shirley Bassey’s “My Way.” This is edgy, risk-taking filmmaking that is sure to ignite debate. A Netflix release.
Saturday, March 4, 6:15pm (Q&A with Bertrand Bonello)
Sunday, March 5, 9:00pm (Introduction by Bertrand Bonello)

The Paris Opera / L’Opèra de Paris
Jean-Stéphane Bron, France, 2017, 110m
French with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere
This all-access documentary goes behind the scenes of the Paris Opera, following the array of personnel—management, performers, costumers, cleaning crew—who work to bring breathtaking spectacle to audiences night after night. Over the course of a season, director Jean-Stéphane Bron nimbly juggles a dizzying number of storylines, from labor disputes to procuring a live bull for Schoenberg’s Moses und Aron to a PR crisis involving the head of the company’s ballet. Sweeping in scope yet full of intimate human moments, The Paris Opera offers a candid look at everything that goes into operating one of the world’s foremost performing arts institutions.
Thursday, March 2, 4:00pm
Saturday, March 11, 3:30pm

Planetarium
Rebecca Zlotowski, France/Belgium, 2016, 105m
English and French with English subtitles
Natalie Portman lends her star power to this dreamy, visually ravishing tale of magic and movies set in a glamorous vision of 1930s Paris. She and her sister (Lily-Rose Depp) form a psychic duo, touring the stages of Europe performing séances. When they catch the eye of a movie producer (Emmanuel Salinger), he resolves to make them stars and to capture an act of spiritualism on film. Forgoing traditional narrative structure in favor of swooning atmosphere, director Rebecca Zlotowksi revels in the Art Deco architecture, sumptuous period couture, and doomed decadence of prewar Paris. A Swen Group release.
Friday, March 3, 9:30pm (Q&A with Rebecca Zlotowski)
Tuesday, March 7, 2:00pm

Film Comment Presents:
Raw / Grave
Julia Ducournau, France/Belgium, 2016, 99m
French with English subtitles
When incoming freshman—and lifelong vegetarian—Justine (Garance Marillier) joins her older sister (Ella Rumpf) at a strangely decrepit veterinary college, she seems poised to be the school’s new star pupil. But a hazing ritual in which she’s forced to eat raw meat awakens something primal in Justine: a newfound—and highly disturbing—taste for flesh. The feature debut from Julia Ducournau marks the arrival of a bold new directorial voice, blending blood-spattered body horror, pitch-black comedy, and one of the most dysfunctional sisterly relationships ever depicted on screen into a potent, emotionally resonant coming-of-age nightmare. A Focus Features release.
Tuesday, March 7, 6:45pm (Q&A with Julia Ducournau)
Wednesday, March 8, 9:15pm (Introduction by Julia Ducournau)

Right Here Right Now/ Tout de suite maintenant
Pascal Bonitzer, France/Belgium/Luxembourg, 2016, 98m
French with English subtitles
Workplace drama doesn’t get any messier than in this intriguingly knotty tale of corporate backbiting and buried secrets. Nora (Agathe Bonitzer) is a bright young professional whose new job at a financial firm turns out to be a trial by fire when she learns that her bosses (Lambert Wilson and Pascal Greggory) share a tumultuous history with her prickly mathematician father (Jean-Pierre Bacri). Meanwhile, an interoffice romance with a competitive colleague (Vincent Lacoste) leads to even more complications, leaving Nora to navigate a minefield of delicate relationships as she climbs the corporate ladder. Isabelle Huppert costars and delivers a typically multilayered performance as one of many sharply etched characters populating this complex moral tale.
Friday, March 10, 9:30pm
Sunday, March 12, 5:45pm

Slack Bay / Ma Loute
Bruno Dumont, France/Germany, 2016, 122m
English and French with English subtitles
In a postcard-perfect seaside village in 1910, an eccentric (to put it mildly) leisure-class family whiles away the summer. But something troubling is afoot: what’s behind the string of tourists gone mysteriously missing? Former enfant terrible Bruno Dumont continues his surprising foray into farce—which began with 2014’s acclaimed Li’l Quinquin—with this surreal, oddball mix of slapstick and detective story. The director and his cast (which includes Fabrice Luchini, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, and a very game Juliette Binoche) stretch each joke to its breaking point, resulting in a winking, weirdly captivating comedy that’s in on its own absurdity. A Kino Lorber release.
Thursday, March 9, 6:30pm
Saturday, March 11, 9:00pm

Sophie’s Misfortunes / Les malheurs de Sophie
Christophe Honoré, France, 2016, 106m
French with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere
Based on the French children’s classic by the Countess of Ségur, the latest from Christophe Honoré is an enchanting fable for adults and kids alike, set in a light-filled 19th-century chateau. The film captures the imaginative freedom of childhood through the eyes of the irrepressible Sophie (Caroline Grant), a mischievous young girl whose life changes drastically after she’s left in the care of a severe stepmother (Muriel Robin)—a far cry from the life she had with her loving mother (Golshifteh Farahani). With the help of her two friends and their mother (Anaïs Demoustier), Sophie works to escape her stepmother’s wicked grasp. Throughout, Honoré combines gorgeous period detail with playful modern touches: a bouncy electronic score by Alex Beaupain, expressive handheld camerawork, and a menagerie of animated animals.
Saturday, March 4, 12:30pm (Q&A with Christophe Honoré)
Wednesday, March 8, 2:00pm (Intro with Christophe Honoré)

The Stopover / Voir du pays
Delphine & Muriel Coulin, France/Greece, 2016, 102m
French and Greek with English subtitles
On their way home from Afghanistan, a band of French soldiers stop in Cyprus for decompression: three-days at a sun-splashed resort, where they will undergo intense psychological debriefing. There, amidst the crystal-blue waters and hordes of vacationing tourists, Marine (Soko) and Aurore (Ariane Labed)—two of only three women in their male-dominated unit—confront rage, trauma, and army sexism as they struggle to readjust to “normal” life. This riveting drama—winner of the Best Screenplay award in the Un Certain Regard competition at Cannes—is an all-too-rare exploration of war’s psychological wounds on female soldiers. A First Run Features release.
Thursday, March 9, 9:00pm
Friday, March 10, 4:15pm

Struggle for Life / La Loi de la jungle
Antonin Peretjatko, France, 2016, 99m
French with English subtitles
In this wild, joke-a-minute slapstick satire, a middle-aged intern (Vincent Macaigne) is sent from France to French Guiana to oversee the creation of a South American ski resort led by Galgaric (Mathieu Amalric). There, he meets a beautiful intern at the National Forestry Office named Tarzan (Vimala Pons) and what ensues is a surreal journey through the Amazon jungle, with absurdist bureaucratic disasters, an aphrodisiac mishap, and a cannibal encounter. Playing something like a Jerry Lewis gag-fest meets Survivor, Struggle for Life combines anarchic black comedy with a scathing critique of colonialism.
Monday, March 6, 7:00pm (Q&A with Antonin Peretjatko)
Tuesday, March 7, 9:15pm (Introduction by Antonin Peretjatko)

The Together Project / L’effet aquatique
Sólveig Anspach, France/Iceland, 2016, 83m
English, French, and Icelandic with English subtitles
The final film from the late French-Icelandic director Sólveig Anspach is an irresistibly offbeat aquatic comedy. When gawky construction worker Samir (Samir Guesmi) encounters prickly swim instructor Agathe (Florence Loiret Caille), he’s immediately smitten. But his unconventional plan to win her over—pretending he can’t swim in order to take lessons from her—proves more than a little problematic. Sweet without being cloying, quirky without being grating, this romantic charmer succeeds thanks to the interplay between the two leads and Anspach’s breezy sincerity.
Friday, March 3, 4:00pm (Q&A with composer Martin Wheeler)
Thursday, March 9, 2:00pm

SPECIAL EVENTS

Live Talk with Agnès Varda
French New Wave pioneer Agnès Varda has been a major voice in world cinema for more than sixty years, ever since her 1955 debut feature La Pointe Courte. Her distinguished and varied career includes photography, nonfiction and fiction shorts and features, and, more recently, multimedia installations at museums and galleries around the world. Join Varda in this special live event as she reflects on her voluminous body of work, influences, and approach to filmmaking.
Presented in conjunction with the French Institute Alliance Française’s upcoming series Agnès Varda: Life as Art and Varda’s first exhibition in NYC at Blum & Poe gallery.
Friday, March 10, 6:00pm
*Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater, 144 West 65th Street

Panel: International Co-Productions
Producers from the U.S. and France will sit down to discuss the strategies and challenges of international co-productions—from the creative to the technical, and everything in between. Scheduled panelists include Killer Films’ Head of Production & Development David Hinojosa (Wiener-Dog, Frank & Lola), Parts & Labor co-founder Jay Van Hoy (Beginners, Frank & Lola, The Witch), and Les films du bélier’s Justin Taurand (Heal the Living, 2016 IFCIC Award for Best Young Producer). Moderated by Eugene Hernandez. Presented in partnership with IFP and French in Motion.
Thursday, March 2, 5:30pm
*Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater, 144 West 65th Street

Panel: Film as Political Intervention
In response to the disillusionment and frustration currently felt worldwide, directors from this year’s edition will discuss how films can address political turmoil or social unrest and operate as whistle-blowers.
Friday, March 3, 5:00pm
*Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater, 144 West 65th Street

Panel: Julian Starke’s French Waves with French Touch DJs Pedro Winter, Para One and Jacques
French touch (aka French house) musicians Pedro Winter, Para One, and Jacques will discuss their perspectives on and experiences with French electronic music following a free screening of Julian Starke’s French Waves, an immersive documentary that pinpoints key moments of French Touch since the 1990s.
Saturday, March 4, 5:00pm
*Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater, 144 West 65th Street

Free Screening: Call My Agent! / Dix pour cent
Episode 1 (“Cécile”), France, 2015, 60m
French with English subtitles
At a top-tier talent firm in Paris, a group of agents juggle their personal and hyper-competitive work lives after experiencing an unexpected crisis. Watch the first episode of the hit French miniseries, created by Dominique Besnehard and Fanny Herrero and featuring Cécile de France (who also appears in this year’s Opening Night film, Django), at this special free screening during Rendez-Vous with French Cinema. A Netflix original series.
Saturday, March 11, 4:30pm
*Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater, 144 West 65th Street

EXHIBITION

Fellini, 8 ½ in Color
PHOTOGRAPHS BY PAUL RONALD
Curated by Sam Stourdzé
8 ½ was Federico Fellini’s last black-and-white film after more than a decade of directing. Although the film’s images were never intended to be seen in color, Piero Servo—a frequent camera operator for Fellini—recently found the late photographer Paul Ronald’s long-forgotten box of color negatives. These rediscoveries are the focus of this year’s Rendez-Vous with French Cinema exhibition, curated by Sam Stourdzé, the director of the esteemed Les Rencontres d’Arles, and accompanied by recollections from one of the film’s stars, Anouk Aimée.
Special thanks to Anouk Aimée, Piero Servo, Antonio Moraldi, and Stéphane Marti.
On view in the Furman Gallery in the Walter Reade Theater, March 1-12

UNIFRANCE
For more than 65 years, UniFrance has been using its experience of the international marketplace for the good of French cinema. UniFrance is based in Paris, and also has representatives in New York, Seoul, Beijing, and Tokyo. Its membership brings together around 1,000 French producers, filmmaking talents, agents, and sales companies, who are working together to promote French film among foreign audiences, industry executives, and media.

UniFrance receives generous, year-round support from CNC, the Ministry of Culture and Communication, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development, Institut français, PROCIREP, Renault, Lacoste, Air France and Titra Film. For more information, visit http://en.unifrance.org/.

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Comment, the U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from The New York Times, Shutterstock, Variety, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. American Airlines is the Official Airline of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. For more information, visit www.filmlinc.org and follow @filmlinc on Twitter.

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Film – FESTIVALS New Directors /New Films — Full Lineup March 16-27, 2016 *nyc #NDNF #MoMA #FSLC

We Highly Recommend this series, especially THIS YEAR!

Celebrating its 45th edition in 2016, New Directors/New Films introduces New York audiences to the work of emerging filmmakers from around the world. Throughout its rich history, New Directors has uncovered talents like Pedro Almódovar, Darren Aronofsky, Nicole Holofcener, Spike Lee, Kelly Reichardt, and Steven Spielberg.

Film Society and MoMA members may purchase tickets starting at noon on Monday, February 29. Tickets will be available for purchase by the general public at noon on Friday, March 4. To become a member of the Film Society or MoMA please visit filmlinc.org and MoMA.org, respectively.

Please note: New Directors does not accept open submissions.

New Directors/New Films is supported by The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art, The New York Times, American Airlines, and Stella Artois.

 

Under the Shadow

The Film Society of Lincoln Center and The Museum of Modern Art have revealed the complete lineup for the 45th annual New Directors/New Films, which will take place March 16-27. Since 1972, the festival has been an annual rite of early spring in New York City, bringing exciting discoveries from around the world to adventurous moviegoers. Dedicated to the discovery of new works by emerging and dynamic filmmaking talent, this year’s festival will screen 27 features and 10 shorts.

“So much of the conversation about the state of cinema skews negative these days. Think of New Directors/New Films as an antidote to that pessimism,” said Film Society of Lincoln Center Director of Programming Dennis Lim. “This year’s lineup is full of new and emerging voices who are taking big risks and pushing boundaries, often against considerable odds, and rethinking the possibilities of the art form, in ways big and small. If this is even a small glimpse into the future of cinema, there are many reasons to be hopeful.”

Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film at The Museum of Modern Art, said, “Sometimes, especially when the industry faces challenges that risk alienating audiences and emerging voices, it’s important to remember that filmmaking is an art form that has the power to inspire, transport as well as entertain. Only when we are allowed to laugh, cry and think at the same time does cinema reach its full potential. I’m thrilled to say that we’ve found a new group of filmmakers firing on all pistons!”

Cameraperson

Cameraperson

Opening the festival is Babak Anvari’s debut feature Under the Shadow, about a mother and daughter haunted by a sinister, largely unseen presence during the Iran-Iraq War. Brimming with a mounting sense of dread until its ominous finish, this expertly crafted, politically charged thriller was a breakout hit at Sundance, called “the first great horror movie of the year” (Eric Kohn, Indiewire).

The Closing Night selection is Kirsten Johnson’s Cameraperson, a remarkable chronicle of the cinematographer-turned-director’s life through her collaborations with documentary icons Laura Poitras, Michael Moore, and others. A self-described memoir, Johnson’s first solo directorial effort examines the delicate, complex relationship between filmmaker and subject and is one of nine festival features and four shorts directed by women.

This year’s slate includes a number of films that have won major awards on the festival circuit, including Josh Kriegman and Elyse Sternberg’s Sundance Grand Jury Prizewinner Weiner; Ryusuke Hamaguchi’s Happy Hour, for which the main cast shared Locarno’s Best Actress award; Avishai Sivan’s Tikkun and Pascale Breton’s Suite Armoricaine, winners of the Locarno Special Jury and critics’ prizes, respectively; and Bi Gan’s Kaili Blues, which took home both the Golden Horse Award for Best New Director and Locarno’s honors for Emerging Artist and Best First Feature.

Evolution

Evolution

Among the feature debuts are Zhang Hanyi’s Life After Life, executive-produced by Chinese master Jia Zhangke; Anita Rocha da Silveira’s psychosexual coming-of-age story Kill Me Please; Tamer El Said’s Cairo-set film within a film In the Last Days of the City; and Ted Fendt’s Short Stay, the only film in the festival to screen on 35mm.

Previously announced titles include Zhao Liang’s Behemoth, Marcin Wrona’s Demon, Anna Rose Holmer’s The Fits, Pietro Marcello’s Lost and Beautiful, Yaelle Kayam’s Mountain, Gabriel Mascaro’s Neon Bull, Raam Reddy’s Thithi, and Clément Cogitore’s The Wakhan Front.

The New Directors/New Films selection committee is made up of members from both presenting organizations: from the Film Society of Lincoln Center, Dennis Lim, Florence Almozini, Marian Masone, and Gavin Smith, and from The Museum of Modern Art, Rajendra Roy, Joshua Siegel, and Sophie Cavoulacos.

Film Society and MoMA members may purchase tickets starting at noon on Monday, February 29. Tickets will be available for purchase by the general public at noon on Friday, March 4. To become a member of the Film Society or MoMA please visit filmlinc.org and MoMA.org, respectively.

The Apostate

The Apostate

Features:

Opening Night
Under the Shadow
Babak Anvari, UK/Jordan/Qatar, 2016, 84m
Farsi with English subtitles
It’s eight years into the Iran-Iraq War, but the troubles of wife and mother in Tehran have only just begun. Shideh (Narges Rashidi) is thwarted in her attempts to return to medical school because of past political activities. And as Iraqi bombs close in, her husband is sent off to serve in the military, neighbors begin to flee, and she is left alone with her young daughter, Dorsa, who refuses to be separated from her favorite doll. At first, Dorsa’s tantrums seem to simply be the complaints of a cranky child. But soon she’s in conversation with an invisible woman—no imaginary friend, this one—and the cracks in the walls and ceilings of their apartment could just be the result of something more than air raids. And what is that she sees down the hall, from the corner of her eye? Though Shideh is a woman of science, she begins to suspect that a malevolent spirit, a djinn, is stalking them. A political horror story that rises up from the rubble of war, Babak Anvari’s feature debut boasts a terrific performance by Rashidi as a woman with more than one war going on in her home and in her head, who must save her daughter from dangers both physical and supernatural.

Closing Night
Cameraperson
Kirsten Johnson, USA, 2016, 102m
How much of one’s self can be captured in the images shot of and for others? Kirsten Johnson may be a first-time (solo) feature-film director, but her work as a director of photography and camera operator has helped earn her documentary collaborators (Laura Poitras, Michael Moore, Kirby Dick, Barbara Kopple) nearly every accolade and award possible. Recontextualizing the stunning images inside, around, and beyond the works she has shot, Johnson constructs a visceral and vibrant self-portrait of an artist who has traveled the globe, venturing into landscapes and lives that bear the scars of trauma both active and historic. Rigorous yet nimble in its ability to move from heartache to humor, Cameraperson provides an essential lens on the things that make us human.

The Apostate / El apóstata
Federico Veiroj, Spain/France/Uruguay, 2015, 80m
Spanish with English subtitles
With wry humor and deep conviction, Uruguayan filmmaker Federico Veiroj (A Useful Life, ND/NF 2010) observes a young Spaniard’s maddening efforts to abandon the Catholic Church. Petitioning the local bishop in Madrid to hand over his baptismal records, the philosophy student is soon confronted with a stubborn bureaucracy and comically agonized tests of his fidelity and patience. Scenes of pithy theological discussion (performed by the film’s excellent ensemble cast) are interspersed with oneiric flights of imagination, cohering to produce a work that is by turns seriously philosophical and irreverently funny. While Veiroj’s tone may be more gently ironic than that of Luis Buñuel (his spiritual forebear), The Apostate nonetheless traces in bracing fashion the competing forces of conformity and rebellion, spiritual yearning and carnal desire, at war within us all.

Screening with:
Concerning the Bodyguard
Kasra Farahani, USA, 2015, 10m
This stylish adaptation of Donald Barthelme’s story, narrated by Salman Rushdie, takes on the power structures of a dictatorship with brio.

Donald Cried

Donald Cried

Behemoth / Beixi moshuo
Zhao Liang, China/France, 2015, 91m
Mandarin with English subtitles
Political documentarian Zhao Liang draws inspiration from The Divine Comedy for this simultaneously intoxicating and terrifying glimpse at the ravages wrought upon Inner Mongolia by its coal and iron industries. A poetic voiceover speaks of the insatiability of desire on top of stunning images of landscapes (and their decimation), machines (and their spectacular functions), and people (and the toll of their labor). Interspersed are sublime tableaux of a prone nude body—asleep? just born? dead?—posed against a refracted horizon. A wholly absorbing guided tour of exploding hillsides, dank mine shafts, cacophonous factories, and vacant cities, Behemoth builds upon Zhao’s previous exposés (2009’s Petition, 2007’s Crime and Punishment) by combining his muckraking streak with a painterly vision of a social and ecological nightmare otherwise unfolding out of sight, out of mind. Winner of the environmental Green Drop Award at the Venice Film Festival. North American Premiere

Demon
Marcin Wrona, Poland/Israel, 2015, 94m
English, Polish, and Yiddish with English subtitles
Newly arrived from England to marry his fiancée Zaneta, Peter has been given a gift of her family’s ramshackle country house in rural Poland. It’s a total fixer-upper, and while inspecting the premises on the eve of the wedding, he falls into a pile of human remains. The ceremony proceeds, but strange things begin to happen… During the wild reception, Peter begins to come undone, and a dybbuk, that iconic ancient figure from Jewish folklore, takes a toehold in this present-day celebration—for a very particular reason, as it turns out. The final work by Marcin Wrona, who died just as Demon was set to premiere in Poland, is an eerie, richly atmospheric film—part absurdist comedy, part love story—that scares, amuses, and charms in equal measure. Winner of Best Horror Feature at Fantastic Fest. An Orchard release.

Donald Cried
Kris Avedisian, USA, 2016, 85m
Trust me, you can’t go home again. Kris Avedisian’s unhinged first feature is a brilliant twist on the family-reunion melodrama and the classic buddy comedy. Returning after 20 years to Warwick, Rhode Island, for his grandmother’s funeral, Peter Latang (Jesse Wakeman), now a slick city financier, has to endure a blast from the past and relive some very cringeworthy moments when hanging out with his former high-school bestie, the obnoxious Donald Treebeck (Avedisian). By turns depressing and funny while subtly shifting our sympathies thanks to sharp dialogue and extremely well-written characters, Donald Cried can perhaps best be summed up as The Color Wheel meets Planes, Trains and Automobiles.

Eldorado

Eldorado XXI

Eldorado XXI
Salomé Lamas, Portugal/France, 2016, 125m
Spanish, Quechua, and Aymara with English subtitles
Salomé Lamas’s Eldorado XXI immerses the viewer in the breathtaking views and extreme conditions of La Rinconada in the Peruvian Andes, the highest-elevation permanent human settlement in the world. Here, some 17,000 feet above sea level, miners face misery and lawlessness in the hopes of striking gold, chewing coca leaves to stave off exhaustion. They toil for weeks without pay under the inhumane lottery system known as cachorreo, gambling on an eventual fortune if they can survive the despoiled landscape long enough. Life in this remotest outpost of civilization seems to unfold in the grip of an illusion, and the film itself frequently resembles a hallucination, not least in an extended tour-de-force shot that reveals an endless stream of miners trekking up and down the mountain as we hear radio reports and stories of their daily lives. Full of unforgettable images and sounds, Eldorado XXI is a transporting, fundamentally mysterious experience that renews the possibilities of the ethnographic film. North American Premiere

Evolution / Évolution
Lucile Hadžihalilović, France, 2015, 81m
French with English subtitles
On a remote island, populated solely by women and young boys, 10-year-old Nicolas plays with other children, but not in a carefree manner. And while the women may have maternal instincts, something is awry: they gather on the beach at night for a strange ritual that Nicolas struggles to understand, and the boys are taken to a hospital regularly for mysterious treatments. And water is everywhere. This is the stuff nightmares are made of, and Nicolas appears to be living out one of his own. In the follow-up to her directorial debut, Innocence, Lucile Hadžihalilović continues her exploration of growing up—where we’re going and what we’re leaving behind. As Nicolas discovers more, feelings of fear, melancholy, and also eroticism bubble to the surface. Hadžihalilović has created a dark fantasy that we are invited to explore and make our own discoveries, however macabre they may be. An Alchemy release.

the fits ND NF 2016 image

The Fits
Anna Rose Holmer, USA, 2015, 72m
The transition from girlhood to young womanhood is one that’s nearly invisible in cinema. Enter Anna Rose Holmer, whose complex and absorbing narrative feature debut elegantly depicts a captivating 11-year-old’s journey of discovery. Toni (played by the majestically named Royalty Hightower) is a budding boxer drawn to a group of dancers training at the same rec center in Cincinnati. She begins aligning herself with one of the two troupes, the Lionesses, becoming immersed in their world, which Holmer conveys with a hypnotic sense of rhythm and a rare gift for rendering physicality—evident most of all when a mysterious, convulsive condition begins to afflict a number of girls. Set entirely within the intimate confines of a few familiar settings (public school, the gym), and pulsating with bodies in motion, The Fits encourages us to recall the confused magic of entering the second decade of life. An Oscilloscope release.

Happy Hour

Happy Hour

Happy Hour
Ryusuke Hamaguchi, Japan, 2015, 317m
Japanese with English subtitles
Four thirtysomething female friends in the misty seaside city of Kobe navigate the unsteady currents of their work, domestic, and romantic lives. They speak solace in one another’s company, but a sudden revelation creates a rift, and rouses each woman to take stock. Ryusuke Hamaguchi’s wise, precisely observed, compulsively watchable drama of friendship and midlife awakening runs over five hours, yet the leisurely duration is not an indulgence but a careful strategy—to show what other films leave out, to create a space for everyday moments that is nonetheless charged with possibility, and to yield an emotional density rarely available to a feature-length movie. Developed through workshops with a cast of mostly newcomers (the extraordinary lead quartet shared the Best Actress award at the Locarno Film Festival), and filled with absorbing sequences that flow almost in real time, Happy Hour has a novelistic depth and texture. But it’s also the kind of immersive, intensely moving experience that remains unique to cinema.

In the Last Days of the City / Akher Ayam El Madina
Tamer El Said, Egypt/Germany/Great Britain/United Arab Emirates, 2016, 118m
Arabic with English subtitles
This film within a film is a haunting yet lyric chronicle of recent years in the Arab world, where revolutions seemed to spark hope for change and yield further instability in one stroke. The more things change, the more they stay the same. Khalid Abdalla (The Kite Runner, The Square) plays the protagonist of Tamer El Said’s ambitious feature debut, a filmmaker in Cairo attempting to capture the zeitgeist of his city as the world changes around him—from personal love and loss to the fall of the Mubarak regime. Throughout, friends send footage and stories from Berlin, Baghdad, and Beirut, creating a powerful, multilayered meditation on togetherness, the tactile hold of cities, and the meaning of homeland. Shot in 2008 and completed this year, the film explores the weight of cinematic images as record and storytelling in an ongoing time of change. North American Premiere

I Promise You Anarchy / Te prometo anarquía
Julio Hernández Cordón, Mexico/Germany, 2015, 100m         
Spanish with English subtitles
Miguel (Diego Calva) and Johnny (Eduardo Eliseo Martinez) are in deep. Badass skater-bros, crazy-in-love blood hustlers, they’re flowing inevitably toward a sea swimming with narco-sharks. This is Mexico City today, and for two boys from different worlds but the same house—Johnny is the son of Miguel’s family maid—there is no future. On the days they do have at their disposal, they will live as hard as they can, even if it means total destruction for everyone around them. A harrowing vision of the 21st century replete with garishly lit sex scenes, inebriated slow motion, and an exhilarating, eclectic pop soundtrack, and winner of numerous prizes at festivals in Latin America, Julio Hernández Cordón’s film is exploding with beats, sweat, and pain—an ecstatic and anguished portrait of youth teetering on the brink of nihilism. U.S. Premiere

In the Last Days of the City

In the Last Days of the City

Kaili Blues / Lu bian ye can
Bi Gan, China, 2015, 113m
Mandarin with English subtitles
A multiple prizewinner at the Locarno Film Festival and one of the most audacious and innovative debuts of recent years, Bi Gan’s endlessly surprising shape-shifter comes to assume the uncanny quality of a waking dream as it poetically and mysteriously interweaves the past, present, and future. Chen Sheng, a country doctor in the Guizhou province who has served time in prison, is concerned for the well-being of his nephew, Weiwei, whom he believes his thug brother Crazy Face intends to sell. Weiwei soon vanishes, and Chen sets out to find him, embarking on a mystical quest that takes him to the riverside city of Kaili and the town of Dang Mai. Through a remarkable arsenal of stylistic techniques, the film develops into a one-of-a-kind road movie, at once magical and materialist, traversing both space and time. U.S. Premiere

Kill Me Please / Mate-me por favor
Anita Rocha da Silveira, Brazil/Argentina, 2015, 101m
Portuguese with English subtitles
Anita Rocha da Silveira’s vibrantly morbid debut feature is a coming-of-age story in which passive aggression on the handball court, jealousy among friends, and teenage angst unfold in the foreground of a slasher flick. In Rio de Janeiro’s Barra da Tijuca—a newly formed upper-middle-class neighborhood of car-lined thoroughfares, gigantic malls, and monolithic white condos—a clique of teenage girls become fearfully captivated by a string of gruesome murders. The most fascinated is Bia (Valentina Herszage), whose own sexual discoveries evolve alongside the mounting deaths in this skewed world of wild colors and transformative desires. With nods to Brian De Palma’s Carrie, Jacques Tourneur’s Cat People, and the atmospheres of David Lynch, Rocha da Silveira’s contribution to the genre is nonetheless entirely her own.

Life After Life / Zhi fan ye mao
Zhang Hanyi, China, 2016, 80m
Mandarin with English subtitles
Zhang Hanyi’s exquisitely restrained ghost story combines the gentle supernaturalism of Apichatpong Weerasethakul with the clear-eyed social realism of Jia Zhangke (one of the film’s executive producers). A young boy, Leilei, becomes possessed by his late mother, Xiuying, whose spirit has wandered the Shanxi Province’s disintegrating cave homes for years. With the help of Leilei’s father (who receives his late wife’s return with matter-of-fact equanimity), they set out to move a tree from her family’s courtyard before she departs again. In ethereal, beautifully composed sequences of a barren rural-industrial village on the edge of collapse, itself a kind of purgatorial space, Zhang captures the spectral gap between life and oblivion. North American Premiere

ipromiseyouanarchy

I Promise You Anarchy

Lost and Beautiful / Bella e perduta
Pietro Marcello, Italy/France, 2015, 87m
Italian with English subtitles
Pietro Marcello continues his intrepid work along the borderline of fiction and documentary with this beautiful and beguiling film, by turns neorealist and fabulist, worthy of Pasolini in its matter-of-fact lyricism and political conviction. Shot on expired 16mm film stock and freely incorporating archival footage and folkloric tropes, it begins as a portrait of the shepherd Tommaso, a local hero in the Campania region of southern Italy, who volunteered to look after the abandoned Bourbon palace of Carditello despite the state’s apathy and threats from the Mafia. Tommaso suffers a fatal heart attack in the course of shooting, and Marcello’s bold and generous response is to grant his subject’s dying wish: for a Pulcinella straight out of the commedia dell’arte to appear on the scene and rescue a buffalo calf from the palace. With Lost and Beautiful, a documentary that soars into the realm of myth, Marcello has crafted a uniquely multifaceted and enormously moving work of political cine-poetry. Winner of two awards at the Locarno Film Festival. U.S. Premiere

Mountain / Ha’har
Yaelle Kayam, Denmark/Israel, 2015, 83m
Hebrew with English subtitles
Atop Jerusalem’s Mount of Olives, Zvia, a Jewish Orthodox woman, lives surrounded by an ancient cemetery with her four children and husband, a Yeshiva teacher who pays scant attention to her. Yaelle Kayam’s feature debut moves beyond the symbolic landscape of a woman’s isolation to offer a subtle and finely paced entryway into the character’s surprising inner life. On a nighttime walk through the tombstones, Zvia encounters a group of prostitutes and their handlers and gradually becomes an unlikely bystander to their after-hours activities, trading home-cooked meals for companionship—an usual sort, perhaps, but one that upends her existence as a mother and wife. Shani Klein’s arresting lead performance challenges clichés of female subjectivity in the filmmaker’s own society, culminating in Zvia’s dramatic attempt to bring change to her life; throughout, keenly observed frames, by turn luminous and moody, asserts the heroine’s volition with intention and finesse.

Nakom
T.W. Pittman & Kelly Daniela Norris, Ghana/USA, 2016, 90m
Kusaal with English subtitles
When his father dies suddenly, medical-student Iddrisu (Jacob Ayanaba) leaves the good life in the city and returns home to Nakom, a remote farming village. He’s now the head of the family, and he finds he must repay a debt that could destroy them all. Over the course of a growing season, Iddrisu confronts both the tragedy and the beauty of village life and must choose between a future for himself in the city or one for his family and the entire village. Filming in the village of Nakom in northern Ghana, directors T.W. Pittman and Kelly Daniela Norris capture in exquisite detail the lives of people steeped in rural tradition but who yearn to be a part of a new world. Along with writer Isaac Adakudugu and a nonprofessional cast—many of whom are revelations—they have created in Nakom an intimate yet universal story about the search for independence while feeling the pull of tradition. North American Premiere

Kaili Blues

Kaili Blues

Neon Bull / Boi neon
Gabriel Mascaro, Brazil/Uruguay/Netherlands, 2015, 101m
Portuguese with English subtitles
A rodeo movie unlike any other, Gabriel Mascaro’s Venice and Toronto prize-winning follow-up to his 2014 fiction debut August Winds tracks handsome cowboy Iremar (Juliano Cazarré) as he travels around to work at vaquejada rodeos, a Brazilian variation on the sport in which two men on horseback attempt to bring a bull down by its tail. Iremar dreams of becoming a fashion designer, creating flamboyant outfits for his co-worker, single mother Galega (Maeve Jinkings). Along with Galega’s daughter Cacá and a bullpen worker named Zé, these complex characters, drawn with tremendous compassion and not an ounce of condescension, make up an unorthodox family, on the move across the northeast Brazilian countryside. Sensitive to matters of gender and class, and culminating in one of the most audacious and memorable sex scenes in recent memory, Neon Bull is a quietly affirming exploration of desire and labor, a humane and sensual study of bodies at work and at play. A Kino Lorber release.

Peter and the Farm
Tony Stone, USA, 2016, 92m
Peter Dunning is a rugged individualist in the extreme, a hard-drinking loner and former artist who has burned bridges with his wives and children and whose only company, even on harsh winter nights, are the sheep, cows, and pigs he tends on his Vermont farm. Peter is also one of the most complicated, sympathetic documentary subjects to come along in some time, a product of the 1960s counterculture whose poetic idealism has since soured. For all his candor, he slips into drunken self-destructive habits, cursing the splendors of a pastoral landscape that he has spent decades nurturing. Imbued with an aching tenderness, Tony Stone’s documentary is both haunting and heartbreaking, a mosaic of its singular subject’s transitory memories and reflections—however funny, tragic, or angry they may be.

Remainder
Omer Fast, UK/Germany, 2015, 97m
The feature debut by celebrated video artist Omer Fast is a striking, stylish adaptation of English novelist Tom McCarthy’s landmark 2005 novel. Set in London, the narrative kicks off when the anonymous protagonist (Tom Sturridge) is struck by a large object plummeting from the sky. When he comes to, he has no recollection of what happened, and a reparations settlement nets him millions of pounds. The man channels these resources toward creating preposterously ambitious reconstructions of his own dim memories, in the process raising a host of questions about the relationship between reality and simulation, the minute details essential to our perception of places and events, and the limits of artistic monomania. Fast, who has explored similar themes in his own work, adapts McCarthy’s idea-packed novel with lucidity and wit, and Sturridge is mesmerizing as an existential hero searching the void for a trace of meaning. North American Premiere

Kill Me Please

Kill Me Please

Short Stay
Ted Fendt, USA, 2016, 35mm, 61m
Multi-hyphenate Ted Fendt delivers on the promise of his acclaimed short films without sacrificing an ounce of his singular charm and rigor. Shooting on 16mm (blown up to 35mm), the writer-director-editor here focuses on Mike (Mike MacCherone), an ambitionless resident of Haddonfield, New Jersey, who finds himself subletting a friend’s room in Philadelphia and (ineptly) covering his shifts at a by-donation walking-tour company. Mike floats, as if in a trance, from one low-key comic folly to another, each one a strange and subtle moral tale. Fendt’s economy of expression, expert handling of his nonprofessional cast, and incomparable nose for the tragicomic dimension of the everyday distinguishes Short Stay as a truly anomalous work in contemporary American cinema: a film made entirely on its maker’s terms. North American Premiere

Suite Armoricaine
Pascale Breton, France, 2015, 148m
French with English subtitles
In her first feature since her distinctive 2004 debut, Illumination, Pascale Breton returns to her native region of Brittany for this rapturous ensemble film about the persistence of the past in the present. Françoise (Valérie Dréville), an accomplished art historian, leaves Paris to teach at her alma mater in Rennes. Most of her former schoolmates never left town, it turns out, and are curiously eyeing her return. Meanwhile, Ion (Kaou Langoët), a sensitive geography student, falls in love with the blind Lydie (Manon Evenat), and clashes with his estranged, now-homeless mother, Moon (Elina Löwensohn), one of Françoise’s closest friends from the old punk-rock days… As these idiosyncratic, richly drawn characters intersect, their points of view overlap and the tricks of time and memory become apparent. Bursting with ideas and emotion, Suite Armoricaine is a work of symphonic scope and grand themes (love and death, art and beauty, language and music) that finds deep wells of meaning in the smallest and most surprising details and gestures. North American Premiere

Thithi
Raam Reddy, India/USA, 2015, 120m
Hindi with English subtitles
Raam Reddy’s bold, vibrant first feature is closer to Émile Zola than it is to Bollywood. Filmed in India’s southern Karnataka state with all nonprofessional actors, the sprawling narrative follows three generations of sons following the death of the family’s patriarch, their 101-year-old grandfather known as “Century Gowda.” The men’s respective vices—ranging from greed to womanizing to cut-and-dry escapism—bring deliciously comedic misadventures to their village in the days leading up to the thithi, a funeral celebration traditionally held 11 days after a death. This incisive portrait of a community in a time of radical change (while some are looking after their sheep, others are lost in their cell phones) yields exemplary humanist comedy. Winner of two awards at the Locarno Film Festival, the film equally affirms the advent of a new realism within Indian cinema, as well as an engaging new voice in contemporary world cinema.

Nakom

Nakom

Tikkun
Avishai Sivan, Israel, 2015, 120m
Hebrew and Yiddish with English subtitles
In Avishai Sivan’s intense and provocative Tikkun, a prizewinner at the Jerusalem and Locarno Film Festivals, an ultra-Orthodox Yeshiva student experiences a crisis of faith—and visions of earthly delights—when his father brings him back from the brink of death. Was the young man’s improbable survival a violation of God’s will, or was it “tikkun,” a way toward enlightenment and redemption? Sivan imbues the narrative with an indeterminate, hypnotic blend of black comedy and alienated modernism, effecting a singularly uncanny atmosphere. Nonprofessional actor Aharon Traitel, himself a former Hasidic Jew, gives a nuanced, knowing performance as the anguished prodigy, and the black-and-white chiaroscuro photography casts the devoutly private, regimented Hasidic community of old Jerusalem’s Mea Shearim in a morally shaded light. A Kino Lorber release.

The Wakhan Front / Ni le ciel ni la terre
Clément Cogitore, France/Belgium, 2015, 100m
French and Persian with English subtitles
The ingenious conceit of The Wakhan Front, a critical success at Cannes, is to transform the Afghan battlefield—dust and boredom and jolts of explosive violence—into the backdrop for a metaphysical thriller. Jérémie Renier stars as a French army commander who begins to lose the loyalty of his company, as well as his sanity, when soldiers start mysteriously disappearing one by one. Rarely is the madness of war conveyed on screen with such simmering tension and existential fear. Rarely, too, is the ignorance and mistrust between cultures—are the shepherd villagers innocent civilians or Taliban spies?—limned with such poetic insight. A Film Movement release. U.S. Premiere

Weiner
Josh Kriegman & Elyse Steinberg, USA, 2016, 100m
Truly compelling vérité filmmaking requires several key factors to coalesce: intimate access, cinematographic acumen, genuine inquisitiveness, and fascinating subjects. Directors Josh Kriegman and Elyse Steinberg brilliantly meld these elements to create one of the most engaging and entertaining works of nonfiction film in recent years. A truly 21st-century hybrid of classic documentary techniques and reality-based dramatic storytelling, Weiner follows the mayoral election bid of former New York Congressman Anthony Weiner in 2013, an attempted comeback that, as we all know now, was doomed to failure. By turns Shakespearean in its tragedy (it’s clear that Weiner and his inner circle have real political talent) and Christopher Guest-ian in its comedic portrayal of what devolves into a Waiting for Guffman–esque campaign, this is the perfect political film for our time. A Sundance Selects release.

Remainder

Remainder

Shorts Program 1:

Under the Sun / Ri Guang Zhi Xia
Yang Qiu, China, 2015, 19m
Chinese with English subtitles
An incident of random nature entangles two families and brings their plights into sharp focus.

Dirt
Darius Clark Monroe, USA, 2014, 7m
With an unsettling lyricism all his own, Darius Clark Monroe traces an evocative and elliptical portrait of a dirty deed.

Totem
Marte Vold, Norway, 2015, 20m
Norwegian with English subtitles
In seemingly idyllic Oslo, a couple demonstrates the discontents of intimacy with wit and biting honesty. U.S. Premiere

Reluctantly Queer
Akosua Adoma Owusu, Ghana/USA, 2016, 8m
In a letter home to his beloved mother, a young Ghanaian man attempts to unpack his queerness in light of her love.

Isabella Morra
Isabel Pagliai, France, 2015, 22m
French with English subtitles
The courtyards of a housing project become a de facto stage on which unsupervised children perform, spreading rumors and shouting insults in an imitation of adulthood. North American Premiere

Short Stay

Short Stay

Shorts Program 2:

The Digger
Ali Cherri, Lebanon/France/UAE, 2015, 24m
Arabic and Pashto with English subtitles
With ritualistic serenity, a lone caretaker maintains ancient graves in the Sharjah Desert long after the bodies are gone. North American Premiere

We All Love the Seashore / Tout le Monde Aime le Bord de la Mer
Keina Espiñeira, Spain, 2016, 16m
French and Pulaar with English subtitles
A poetic distillation of the liminal space of refugees and migrants, developed collaboratively through encounters on the African coast of the Mediterranean. North American Premiere

Of a Few Days
Timothy Fryett, USA, 2016, 14m
On the South Side of Chicago, final touches on one’s journey on Earth are meticulously made in a decades-old community funeral home. North American Premiere

The Park / Le Park
Randa Maroufi, France, 2015, 14m
French and Arabic with English subtitles
A series of tableaux vivants mesmerizingly locate the intersection of public space, inner lives, and social media within an abandoned Casablanca amusement park. U.S. Premiere

mm

February 19, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

FILM — The 45th edition of New Directors/New Films (March 16-27) MoMA *nyc

The 45th edition of New Directors/New Films (March 16-27)

The Fits

The Film Society of Lincoln Center and The Museum of Modern Art announce the initial eight official selections for the 45th edition of New Directors/New Films (ND/NF), a festival dedicated to the discovery of new works by emerging and dynamic filmmaking talent.

Representing 13 countries from around the world, the initial eight selections are Zhao Liang’s Behemoth (China/France), Marcin Wrona’s Demon (Poland/Israel), Anna Rose Holmer’s The Fits (USA), Pietro Marcello’s Lost and Beautiful (Italy/France), Yaelle Kayam’s Mountain (Denmark/Israel), Gabriel Mascaro’s Neon Bull (Brazil/Uruguay/Netherlands), Raam Reddy’s Thithi(India/USA/Canada), and Clément Cogitore’s The Wakhan Front (France/Belgium).

The initial lineup includes three feature debuts: Yaelle Kayam’s Mountain, about a Jewish Orthodox mother who experiences an inner awakening; Raam Reddy’s Thithi, the winner of Locarno’s Best First Feature and Filmmakers of the Present Golden Leopard Awards, which follows a patriarch’s death and its effect on three generations of sons; and Clément Cogitore’s Cannes critical success The Wakhan Front, a tense, metaphysical thriller that takes place in war-torn Afghanistan.

Sundance audiences loved Anna Rose Holmer’s transfixing first narrative film, The Fits, about a pensive tomboy (Royalty Hightower, in a breakout performance) who seeks acceptance in a Cincinnati dance team with a mysterious affliction.

Gabriel Mascaro’s acclaimed follow-up to August Winds, Neon Bull, provides a provocative look at Brazilian rodeo subcultures that won awards at Venice and Toronto.

Rounding out the initial selections:

Pietro Marcello’s Locarno prizewinner Lost and Beautiful, a chronicle of a beloved shepherd’s dying wish that bears influence from both neorealism and commedia dell’arte;

The late Marcin Wrona’s enthralling horror-comedy Demon, in which a wedding getaway turns sinister when the groom unearths a vengeful spirit;

and

Zhao Liang’s Dante-inspired Behemoth, a harrowing documentary that combines images of pollution-ravaged Inner Mongolia with poetic visions of the environmental devastation.

Well into its fourth decade, New Directors/New Films has been a beacon for emerging directors eager to make their mark on contemporary cinema. The festival has introduced or cemented the status of some of the world’s most celebrated filmmakers, including Chantal Akerman, Pedro Almodóvar, Darren Aronofsky, Ken Burns, Agnieszka Holland, Spike Lee, Christopher Nolan, Steven Spielberg, and Wong Kar Wai. The past few years have featured the work of Ana Lily Amirpour (A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night), J.C. Chandor (Margin Call), Shane Carruth (Upstream Color), Marielle Heller (The Diary of a Teenage Girl), Jennifer Kent (The Babadook), Terence Nance (An Oversimplification of Her Beauty), Naji Abu Nowar (Theeb), Joshua Oppenheimer (The Act of Killing), Sarah Polley (Stories We Tell), Dee Rees (Pariah), Stevan Riley (Listen to Me Marlon), Justin Simien (Dear White People), Miroslav Slaboshpitsky (The Tribe), and Denis Villeneuve (Incendies), among others.

The New Directors/New Films selection committee is made up of members from both presenting organizations: from the Film Society of Lincoln Center, Dennis Lim, Florence Almozini, Marian Masone, and Gavin Smith, and from The Museum of Modern Art, Rajendra Roy, Joshua Siegel, and Sophie Cavoulacos. The complete lineup of selections for the 45th New Directors/New Films Festival will be announced in February.

Film Society and MoMA members may purchase tickets starting at noon on Monday, February 29. Tickets will be available for purchase by the general public at noon on Friday, March 4. To become a member of the Film Society or MoMA please visitfilmlinc.org and MoMA.org, respectively.

The eight official selections include:

Behemoth / Beixi moshuo
Zhao Liang, China/France, 2015, 91m
Mandarin with English subtitles
Political documentarian Zhao Liang draws inspiration from The Divine Comedy for this simultaneously intoxicating and terrifying glimpse at the ravages wrought upon Inner Mongolia by its coal and iron industries. A poetic voiceover speaks of the insatiability of desire on top of stunning images of landscapes (and their decimation), machines (and their spectacular functions), and people (and the toll of their labor). Interspersed are sublime tableaux of a prone nude body—asleep? just born? dead?—posed against a refracted horizon. A wholly absorbing guided tour of exploding hillsides, dank mine shafts, cacophonous factories, and vacant cities, Behemoth builds upon Zhao’s previous exposés (2009’s Petition, 2007’s Crime and Punishment) by combining his muckraking streak with a painterly vision of a social and ecological nightmare otherwise unfolding out of sight, out of mind. Winner of the environmental Green Drop Award at the Venice Film Festival. North American Premiere

Demon
Marcin Wrona, Poland/Israel, 2015, 94m
English, Polish, and Yiddish with English subtitles
Newly arrived from England to marry his fiancée Zaneta, Peter has been given a gift of her family’s ramshackle country house in rural Poland. It’s a total fixer-upper, and while inspecting the premises on the eve of the wedding, he falls into a pile of human remains. The ceremony proceeds, but strange things begin to happen… During the wild reception, Peter begins to come undone, and a dybbuk, that iconic ancient figure from Jewish folklore, takes a toehold in this present-day celebration—for a very particular reason, as it turns out. The final work by Marcin Wrona, who died just as Demon was set to premiere in Poland, is an eerie, richly atmospheric film—part absurdist comedy, part love story—that scares, amuses, and charms in equal measure. Winner of Best Horror Feature at Fantastic Fest. An Orchard release.

The Fits
Anna Rose Holmer, USA, 2015, 72m
The transition from girlhood to young womanhood is one that’s nearly invisible in cinema. Enter Anna Rose Holmer, whose complex and absorbing narrative feature debut elegantly depicts a captivating 11-year old’s journey of discovery. Toni (played by the majestically named Royalty Hightower) is a budding boxer drawn to a group of dancers training at the same rec center in Cincinnati. She begins aligning herself with one of the two troupes, the Lionesses, becoming immersed in their world, which Holmer conveys with a hypnotic sense of rhythm and a rare gift for rendering physicality—evident most of all when a mysterious, convulsive condition begins to afflict a number of girls. Set entirely within the intimate confines of a few familiar settings (public school, the gym), and pulsating with bodies in motion, The Fits encourages us to recall the confused magic of entering the second decade of life. An Oscilloscope release.

Lost and Beautiful / Bella e perduta
Pietro Marcello, Italy/France, 2015, 87m
Italian with English subtitles
Pietro Marcello continues his intrepid work along the borderline of fiction and documentary with this beautiful and beguiling film, by turns neorealist and fabulist, worthy of Pasolini in its matter-of-fact lyricism and political conviction. Shot on expired 16mm film stock and freely incorporating archival footage and folkloric tropes, it begins as a portrait of the shepherd Tommaso, a local hero in the Campania region of southern Italy, who volunteered to look after the abandoned Bourbon palace of Carditello despite the state’s apathy and threats from the Mafia. Tommaso suffers a fatal heart attack in the course of shooting, and Marcello’s bold and generous response is to grant his subject’s dying wish: for a Pulcinella straight out of the commedia dell’arte to appear on the scene and rescue a buffalo calf from the palace. With Lost and Beautiful, a documentary that soars into the realm of myth, Marcello has crafted a uniquely multifaceted and enormously moving work of political cine-poetry. Winner of two awards at the Locarno Film Festival. U.S. Premiere

Mountain / Ha’har
Yaelle Kayam, Denmark/Israel, 2015, 83m
Hebrew with English subtitles
Atop Jerusalem’s Mount of Olives, Zvia, a Jewish Orthodox woman, lives surrounded by an ancient cemetery with her four children and husband, a Yeshiva teacher who pays scant attention to her. Yaelle Kayam’s feature debut moves beyond the symbolic landscape of a woman’s isolation to offer a subtle and finely paced entryway into the character’s surprising inner life. On a nighttime walk through the tombstones, Zvia encounters a group of prostitutes and their handlers and gradually becomes an unlikely bystander to their after-hours activities, trading home-cooked meals for companionship—an usual sort, perhaps, but one that upends her existence as a mother and wife. Shani Klein’s arresting lead performance challenges clichés of female subjectivity in the filmmaker’s own society, culminating in Zvia’s dramatic attempt to bring change to her life; throughout, keenly observed frames, by turn luminous and moody, asserts the heroine’s volition with intention and finesse.

Neon Bull / Boi neon
Gabriel Mascaro, Brazil/Uruguay/Netherlands, 2015, 101m
Portuguese with English subtitles
A rodeo movie unlike any other, Gabriel Mascaro’s Venice and Toronto prize-winning follow-up to his 2014 fiction debut August Winds tracks handsome cowboy Iremar (Juliano Cazarré) as he travels around to work at vaquejada rodeos, a Brazilian variation on the sport in which two men on horseback attempt to bring a bull down by its tail. Iremar dreams of becoming a fashion designer, creating flamboyant outfits for his co-worker, single mother Galega (Maeve Jinkings). Along with Galega’s daughter Cacá and a bullpen worker named Zé, these complex characters, drawn with tremendous compassion and not an ounce of condescension, make up an unorthodox family, on the move across the northeast Brazilian countryside. Sensitive to matters of gender and class, and culminating in one of the most audacious and memorable sex scenes in recent memory, Neon Bull is a quietly affirming exploration of desire and labor, a humane and sensual study of bodies at work and at play. A Kino Lorber release.

Thithi
Raam Reddy, India/USA, 2015, 120m
Kannada with English subtitles
Raam Reddy’s bold, vibrant first feature is closer to Émile Zola than it is to Bollywood. Filmed in India’s southern Karnataka state with nonprofessional actors, the sprawling narrative follows three generations of sons following the death of the family’s patriarch, their 101-year-old grandfather known as “Century Gowda.” The men’s respective vices—ranging from greed to womanizing to cut-and-dry escapism—bring deliciously comedic misadventures to their village in the days leading up to the thithi, a funeral celebration traditionally held 11 days after a death. This incisive portrait of a community in a time of radical change (while some are looking after their sheep, others are lost in their cell phones) yields exemplary humanist comedy. Winner of two awards at the Locarno Film Festival, the film equally affirms the advent of a new realism within Indian cinema, as well as an engaging new voice in contemporary world cinema.

The Wakhan Front / Ni le ciel ni la terre
Clément Cogitore, France/Belgium, 2015, 100m
French and Persian with English subtitles
The ingenious conceit of The Wakhan Front, a critical success at Cannes, is to transform the Afghan battlefield—dust and boredom and jolts of explosive violence—into the backdrop for a metaphysical thriller. Jérémie Renier stars as a French army commander who begins to lose the loyalty of his company, as well as his sanity, when soldiers start mysteriously disappearing one by one. Rarely is the madness of war conveyed on screen with such simmering tension and existential fear. Rarely, too, is the ignorance and mistrust between cultures—are the shepherd villagers innocent civilians or Taliban spies?—limned with such poetic insight. U.S. Premiere

About New Directors/New Films
Dedicated to the discovery and support of emerging artists, New Directors/New Films has earned an international reputation as the premier festival for works that break or re-cast the cinematic mold. The New Directors/New Films selection committee is made up of members from both presenting organizations: from the Film Society of Lincoln Center, Dennis Lim, Florence Almozini, Marian Masone, and Gavin Smith, and from The Museum of Modern Art, Rajendra Roy, Joshua Siegel, and Sophie Cavoulacos. For more information about the festival, visit newdirectors.org and follow the festival on Facebook (facebook.com/newdirectors) and Twitter (@NDNF, #NewDirectors).

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
Founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international cinema, the Film Society of Lincoln Center works to recognize established and emerging filmmakers, support important new work, and to enhance the awareness, accessibility, and understanding of the moving image. The Film Society produces the renowned New York Film Festival, a curated selection of the year’s most significant new film work, and presents or collaborates on other annual New York City festivals including Art of the Real, Dance on Camera, Film Comment Selects, Human Rights Watch Film Festival, New Directors/New Films, New York African Film Festival, New York Asian Film Festival, New York Jewish Film Festival, Open Roads: New Italian Cinema, Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, and Scary Movies. In addition to publishing the award-winning Film Comment magazine, the Film Society recognizes an artist’s unique achievement in film with the prestigious Chaplin Award, whose 2015 recipient was Robert Redford. The Film Society’s state-of-the-art Walter Reade Theater and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, located at Lincoln Center, provide a home for year-round programs and the New York City film community.

For more information, visit www.filmlinc.org, follow @filmlinc on Twitter, and download the FREE Film Society app, now available for iOS (iPhone and iPad) and Android devices.

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART
The Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Film marked its 80th anniversary in 2015. Originally founded in 1935 as the Film Library, the Department of Film is a dedicated champion of cinema past, present, and future. With one of the strongest international collections of motion pictures in the world—totaling more than 30,000 films between the permanent and study collections—the Department of Film is a leader in film preservation and a discoverer of emerging talent. Through The Celeste Bartos Film Preservation Center, a state-of-the-art storage facility in Hamlin, Pennsylvania, MoMA restores and preserves films that are shown across the world and in many of the Museum’s diverse programs, most notably in To Save and Project: The Annual MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation. The Department of Film engages with current cinema by honoring films and filmmakers that will have a lasting historical significance through its annual Film Benefit, which raises funds for the continued maintenance and growth of the collection, and The Contenders series, an annual series of the year’s best movies, as selected by MoMA Film curators from major studio releases and top film festivals. Always looking to the future, the Department of Film is constantly unearthing emerging talent and providing a venue for young filmmakers through programs such as New Directors/New Films and Documentary Fortnight. Playing an essential role in MoMA’s mission to collect, preserve, and exhibit modern and contemporary art, the department was awarded an Honorary Academy Award in 1978 “for the contribution it has made to the public’s perception of movies as an art form.”

SPONSORSHIP:
New Directors/New Films is presented by the Film Society of Lincoln Center and The Museum of Modern Art and is supported by The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art, the Film Society’s New Wave, The New York Times, and American Airlines.

February 4, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dance/Film/Festival — DANCE ON CAMERA FESTIVAL, FEBRUARY 12-16 *nyc

 

FSLC AND DANCE FILMS ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCE LINEUP FOR DANCE ON CAMERA FESTIVAL, FEBRUARY 12-16

THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER AND DANCE FILMS ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCE LINEUP FOR DANCE ON CAMERA FESTIVAL,
FEBRUARY 12-16

Includes 20 features, 36 shorts, four retrospective selections, and many exciting free panels

 

 

The 44th edition of Dance on Camera Festival marks two landmark occasions: the 60th anniversary of the founding of Dance Films Association, which co-presents the festival with the Film Society of Lincoln Center, and the 20th anniversary of the partnership between the two arts organizations on this unique event.

This year’s edition presents audiences with the worlds of ballet, jazz, and contemporary dance; modern and postmodern legends and discoveries, such as the focus of the Closing Night film, Jack Walsh’s Feelings Are Facts: The Life of Yvonne Rainer; flamenco in gypsy enclaves as well as explorations into artistic expression and innovative therapy; stories from a country where women choose to dance despite a cultural bias against it; and, in addition to spotlighting the more traditional forms of dance, the lineup also delves into the exciting world of trapeze—sometimes referred to as “ballet of the air”—in the Opening Night film, Tom Moore’s The Flight Fantastic.

“Celebrating dance in all its many shapes and colors is this festival’s mantra,” said Joanna Ney, co-curator, with Liz Wolff, of the 44th edition. “Diversity, passion and commitment are, as ever, the watchwords of Dance on Camera Festival. From Carmen Amaya’s legacy as seen in her progeny in Bajarí to a remote corner of Québec where a dancing school offers life lessons, to Horizons, a salute to Cuba’s love affair with ballet, the accent is on maintaining tradition as well as looking to the future.”

“Dance on Camera allows for a legacy in dance to be honored and preserved, and this year we highlight this with some of the great male dancers and pioneers: Ted Shawn in The Men Who Danced, Eugene Louis “Luigi” Faccuito in the panel discussion Luigi: Hollywood, Broadway and Beyond, and Alvin Ailey in Lincoln Center at the Movies: Great American Dance. Their accomplishments and innovation have formed generations of great dancers,” said Liz Wolff.

Highlights include:
In-Person Appearances: legendary ballerinas Natalia Makarova (Kirov, ABT, Royal & freelance) and Merrill Ashley (NYCB for 30 years).

A tribute to the great jazz innovator Luigi (Faccuito) with the free panel discussion Luigi: Hollywood, Broadway and Beyond, followed by a screening of Vincente Minnelli’s classic American musical The Band Wagon, in which he appears with Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse.

Meet the Artist with Pat Birch: The festival welcomes the award-winning choreographer to share career insights into her work for stage, screen, and television, including being the mastermind behind the hand jive in the musical hit Grease.

A screening of Lincoln Center at the Movies: Great American Dance – Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, followed by a Q&A with special guests.

Retrospective Highlights: Dance Films Association launches its 60th season with a series of retrospective screenings, featuring significant and compelling films from its six decades of innovative programming. Bessie: A Portrait of Bessie Schonberg about the inspiring mentor and teacher, which will feature directors D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus in person; The Men Who Danced, the story of Jacob’s Pillow founder Ted Shawn and his original all-male troupe; and Lar Lubovitch at Jacob’s Pillow, featuring the choreographer and some of his signature works. These programs represent the rich history that Dance Films Association brings to this unique programming and the special anniversaries marking the potency of the dance cinema genre.

An advance screening of German Kral’s Our Last Tango, featuring Maria Nieves Rego and Juan Carlos Copes, tango’s explosive partnership that ignited audiences for over 40 years.

Tickets go on sale Tuesday, January 12. A pre-sale to Film Society and Dance Films Association members begins Thursday, January 7. Single screening tickets are $14; $11 for students and seniors (62+); and $9 for FSLC and DFA members. See more and save with the All Access Pass or 3+ film discount package. Visit filmlinc.org for more information.

FILMS & DESCRIPTIONS

Opening Night
The Flight Fantastic
Tom Moore, USA, 2015, DCP, 98m
This fascinating look at the world of the flying trapeze centers on one of its greatest acts of all time, The Flying Gaonas. First performing on a trampoline, the Gaonas went on to become a star attraction for the best circuses in the world, including Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey. Director Tom Moore brings their story to life through interviews with family members and colorful archival material gleaned from a variety of sources. The Gaonas light up the screen with their charismatic personalities as we see them pass the torch on to new generations through teaching and coaching. New York Premiere

Screening with:
Love Songs for Robots
Chris Lavis & Maciek Szczerbowski, Canada, 2015, digital projection, 4m
Inspired by the ballet and sculpture of avant-garde artist Oskar Schlemmer, and featuring performances and choreography by Mistaya Hemingway (La La La Human Steps), Love Songs for Robots is an attempt to create the sort of film Martians might make for humans. New York Premiere
Friday, February 12, 8:00pm (Q&A with Tom Moore, Tito Gaona, and Chela Gaona)

Closing Night
Feelings Are Facts: The Life of Yvonne Rainer
Jack Walsh, USA, 2015, DCP, 82m
In the 1960s, Yvonne Rainer revolutionized modern dance as a co-founder of Judson Dance Theater. There, she introduced everyday movements into the dance lexicon, creating “Trio A” and other influential pieces that initially left audiences perplexed but inspired a devoted following. In the ’70s and ’80s, Rainer turned to film, introducing narrative techniques to avant-garde works and consequently turning the genre on its head. This revealing documentary is her story. From her bohemian upbringing to her private and public life as a radical artist, Rainer broke all the rules and created new ones only to reinvent herself time and time again. At 80 years old, she still looks at dance with an explorer’s heart, choreographing pieces that continue to defy assumptions about art and performance.

Screening with:
Public Displays
Michael Kirsch, USA, 2014, digital projection, 4m
Imagine not being able to hold hands, link arms, kiss, or even touch the person you love for fear of disapproval. Michael Kirsch explores this idea as it plays out in the LGBT community, where self-censorship is an everyday reality. New York Premiere
Tuesday, February 16, 8:00pm (Q&A with Yvonne Rainer and Jack Walsh)

After the Curtain
Emelie Mahdavian, USA, 2015, digital projection, 70m
Russian, Tajik, and Shugni in English subtitles
In Emelie Mahdavian’s After the Curtain, four female dancers battle shifting cultural norms and face increasing disfavor in the Post-Soviet, predominantly Muslim nation of Tajikistan. The women weigh their love of art against economic hardship, loneliness, and social reproach in this intimate portrait, which also celebrates the rich dance and music culture of a Central Asian country largely unknown in the West. World Premiere

Screening with:
Plow Plant Reap
Marta Renzi, USA, 2015, digital projection, 13m
Against a majestic landscape of rolling farmlands, an all-female community comes together to join in a baptism and a roundelay. With hints of Appalachian Spring and Amish customs, the piece is performed by members of the Slippery Rock University dance department. New York Premiere
Tuesday, February 16, 3:30pm (Q&A with Emelie Mahdavian)

Bajarí
Eva Vila, Catalonia/Spain, 2013, DCP, 84m
Spanish with English subtitles
Flamenco is passed down along the family in the gypsy community that gave us the icon Carmen Amaya. Carmen’s spirit hovers over the extended family bearing her name—true relatives and adopted “cousins” passionate about their music and dance. The flamenco odyssey begins when Carmen’s grandniece Karime arrives in Barcelona in search of her roots. When her mother Mercedes Amaya (“Winny”) joins Karime from Mexico to put on a show with some of the city’s musical talent, they discover the spirit of Bajarí—the word for Barcelona in Caló, the language of the gypsies. New York Premiere
Saturday, February 13, 6:00pm (Q&A with Eva Vila) Director’s appearance made possible with the generous support of the Institut Ramon Llull.

Ballerina: Program 1, “Body and Soul”
Derek Bailey, UK, 1987, Digibeta, 63m 
Natalia Makarova is considered one of the great ballerinas of her time, whose flawless Kirov Ballet training made her a role model for future dancers. Dance on Camera celebrates her 75th year by presenting “Body and Soul,” the first segment of the Emmy-nominatedBallerina series that she conceived, wrote, and narrated for BBC TV. Unseen for many years, the four-part documentary, from which Program 1 will be shown, examines the qualities that define a true ballerina, with Makarova sharing rare footage of legendary figures Maya Plisetskaya, Margot Fonteyn, Carla Fracci, and the remarkable Sylvie Guillem when she first joined the Paris Opera Ballet. Choreographers Frederick Ashton, Jerome Robbins, and Maurice Bejart provide additional commentary.

Followed by:
Excerpts from Makarova’s personal archive, including selections from her signature roles in Onegin, Manon, Swan Lake, and more. (Digibeta, 20m)
Saturday, February 13, 3:15pm (Followed by an onstage appearance by Natalia Makarova)

The Band Wagon
Vincente Minnelli, USA, 1953, 35mm, 112m
One of the greatest musicals of all time, Vincente Minnelli’s The Band Wagon features stunning choreography by Michael Kidd, including the memorable “Dancing in the Dark” sequence in Central Park, and a clever script by Betty Comden and Adolph Green. The film centers on a musical movie star (Fred Astaire) who fears his career is about to hit the skids, until two friends (Oscar Levant and Nanette Fabray) write a script for him that becomes Broadway-bound. But just as things begin to look promising, an egotistical director (Jack Buchanan) joins the project and casts ballerina Gaby Gerard (Cyd Charisse) as the leading lady. Tensions rise between the two co-stars, who clash immediately and whose temperaments threaten to capsize the show.
Sunday, February 14, 8:00pm

Bessie: A Portrait of Bessie Schonberg
Chris Hegedus & D.A. Pennebaker, USA, 1998, digital projection, 58m
Bessie Schonberg danced with Martha Graham until a knee injury forced her to quit and turn to teaching. For the next 70 years, her passion for dance inspired and challenged many important dancers and choreographers, including Merce Cunningham, Jerome Robbins, Meredith Monk, Lucinda Childs, and Ronald K. Brown. The prestigious New York Dance and Performance Awards, informally known as the Bessie Awards, was named in her honor. Bessie narrates her own incredible story in Chris Hegedus and D.A. Pennebaker’s documentary, which is intercut with personal and archival footage that includes her teaching choreography at Juilliard, Dance Theater Workshop, and Jacob’s Pillow.

Screening with:
The GOLDs
Sue Healey, Australia, 2015, DCP, 34m
The GOLDs (Growing Old Disgracefully) are a group of lively Australians, aged 60 to 90 years, who, after retiring from a range of careers, now live to dance. Despite their aging bodies, The GOLDs demonstrate what works for them: dancing together and exercising their desire to continue learning. U.S. Premiere
Monday, February 15, 1:00pm (Q&A with D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus)

Dance Emergency / Damhsa na heigeandala
Deirdre Mulrooney, Ireland, 2014, DCP, 52m
Irish with English subtitles
A forgotten chapter of modern dance history is revealed in Deirdre Mulrooney’s account of Erina Brady, an Irish-German dancer who, shortly before World War II, brought German expressionist modern dance (Ausdruckstanz) to a conservative, neutral Ireland. There, Brady, the daughter of a former Irish priest who was initially mistaken for a Nazi spy, opened a dance school to teach the Mary Wigman technique. Her dramatic story, framed within the context of Ireland’s thriving contemporary dance scene, comes to life with scenes reenacted by the brilliant Olwen Fouéré, and choreographed by Jessica Kennedy. North American Premiere

Screening with:
The Birch Grove
Gabrielle Lansner, USA, 2015, DCP, 21m
In this film about the power of family ties, inspired by the eponymous novella by Polish author Jaroslaw Iwaszkiewicz, two brothers caught between love and death wrestle with their past in a dance toward reconciliation.
Friday, February 12, 6:00pm (Q&A with Deirdre Mulrooney) Director’s appearance made possible with the generous support of Culture Ireland.

The Dance Goodbye
Ron Steinman, USA, 2015, digital projection, 56m
Merrill Ashley is remembered as one of New York City Ballet’s reigning ballerinas—a leading interpreter of Balanchine roles famous for her racehorse speed and purity of style. After 30 years with the company, Ashley retired in 1997, having sustained numerous injuries during her tenure. Ron Steinman’s candid portrait raises the question, “What next?”—a dilemma so many dancers face when the body no longer works to their standards. The documentary catches Ashley in career crisis as she copes with her loss and plans her next steps, making her way from a farewell performance to rounds of doctors’ appointments, workouts, and teaching duties. A voyage of self-discovery with the ballerina as guide, The Dance Goodbye is a treasure trove of personal photos and performance videos that bring a brilliant career to vivid life. A First Run Features release. World Premiere

Screening with:
David
Loughlan Prior, New Zealand, 2014, DCP, 13m
A dance narrative set against the backdrop of New Zealand’s coastline, Loughlan Prior’s David features two parallel storylines that examine the title character’s young life and those he has come to share it with. U.S. Premiere
Sunday, February 14, 6:00pm (Q&A with Merrill Ashley, Ron Steinman, and Eileen Douglas)

Dance With Them
Béatriz Mediavilla, Canada, 2014, digital projection, 94m
French with English subtitles
Located in a remote corner of rural Québec, the PRELV dance school has been run by choreographer Lynn Vaillancourt for 45 years. Employing a unique approach, she teaches singing and many forms of dance, to her students—aged 4 to 20—and also offers them important life lessons, on such subjects as the spirit of cooperation and mutual respect. A black-and-white charmer, Dance with Themis full of humor and dramatic incidents involving children and teenagers on their way to young adulthood. U.S. Premiere
Tuesday, February 16, 1:00pm (Q&A with Béatriz Mediavilla)

Disportrait
Alejandro Alvarez & Ulrik Wivel, Denmark, 2014, DCP, 52m
Spanish with English subtitles
After transforming Madrid’s Compañía Nacional de Danza into one of the most successful dance companies in the world, Spanish choreographer Nacho Duato is fired. Soon after, Russian billionaire Vladimir Kekhman lures Duato to St. Petersburg and puts the international contemporary dance icon in charge of a major classical ballet company, making him the first foreigner to do so in over 100 years. In this revelatory documentary about an artist in transition, Duato accepts the challenge of modernizing the traditionalist Russian troupe, even as it plunges him into cultural and social isolation. U.S. Premiere

Screening with:
TACTUM: Elements of Dance
Krzysztof Stasiak, Poland, 2015, digital projection, 28m
Polish with English subtitles
According to Ayurveda, the Hindu science of health and medicine, there are three forces that give color to our existence: Green (Kapha), a combination of the elements of water and earth;
Red (Pitta), of fire and water; and Blue (Vata), of air and ether. Inspired by this philosophy, director Krzysztof Stasiak opens a window to an imaginary world as well as to the creation of a series of dances charged with emotion and infused with serenity. U.S. Premiere
Friday, February 12, 3:30pm (Q&A with Alejandro Alvarez)

Enter The Faun
Tamar Rogoff & Daisy Wright, USA, 2014, digital projection, 68m
In Tamar Rogoff and Daisy Wright’s documentary, an unlikely collaboration between a veteran choreographer and a young actor with cerebral palsy delivers astonishing proof that everyone is capable of miraculous transformation. As Rogoff trains Gregg Mozgala to dance in her performance, the two discover that her lack of formal medical training and his fears and physical limitations are not obstacles but the impetus for her choreography and their unprecedented discoveries. Enter The Faun is the story of a joyous, obsessed journey toward opening night, challenging the boundaries of medicine and art as well as the limitations associated with disability.

Screening with:
Martiality, Not Fighting
Marianne M. Kim & Cheng-Chieh Yu, China, 2012, digital projection, 10m
Martiality, Not Fighting follows a young Chinese dancer performing the role of conscientious objector. Moving through the pedestrian and the abstract, he reflects on the question “to fight or not to fight.” The choreography is infused with images drawn from postmodern dance as well as the martial art Ba Gua Zhang. New York Premiere
Sunday, February 14, 3:15pm (Q&A with Tamar Rogoff and Daisy Wright)

Horizons / Horizontes
Eileen Hofer, Switzerland, 2015, DCP, 71m
Spanish with English subtitles
Since its founding, the National Ballet of Cuba has produced many remarkable dancers. Eileen Hofer’s film focuses on three generations of Cuban-born dancers who demonstrate their love and passion for ballet: legend and local hero Alicia Alonso, now 93, the prima ballerina assoluta who founded the classical ballet company; Viengsay Valdes, a rising star; and young Amanda, who dreams of being accepted to the company’s prestigious school. Interweaving their stories as if with an impressionist painter’s brush, Hofer creates a portrait of three exceptional women for whom their native soil is a source of pride, despite the hardships they endure. Archival footage of Alonso in her prime poignantly contrasts with the frail nonagenarian who can still rise to the occasion. New York Premiere

Screening with:
Cubano Bas
Kathy Rose, Cuba, 2015, digital projection, 3m
Kathy Rose’s Cubano Bas shows a mysterious rite with poetic music by Greg Boyer. New York Premiere
Saturday, February 13, 1:00pm

Lincoln Center at the Movies: Great American Dance – Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Matthew Diamond, USA, 2015, DCP, 104m
You don’t just see an Ailey performance, you feel it. And now you can experience the astounding Ailey dancers in an even deeper way as they make their big screen debut.  The program of four audience favorites includes: Wayne McGregor’s sumptuous Chroma, with a score by Jack White and Joby Talbot; Ronald K. Brown’s powerful Grace, with music by Duke Ellington, Roy Davis Jr., and Fela Kuti; artistic director Robert Battle’s humorous, high-flying Takademe; and Alvin Ailey’s beloved masterpiece, Revelations, that will rock your soul.
Monday, February 15, 6:00pm (Q&A with Matthew Diamond, Bennet Rink, and Andrew Wilk)

The Men Who Danced: The Story of Ted Shawn’s Men Dancers and the Birth of Jacob’s Pillow 1933-1940
Ron Honsa, USA, 1985, Digibeta, 60m
The Men Who Danced tells the story of modern-dance pioneer and Jacob’s Pillow founder Ted Shawn, and his mission to create an all-male dance company. Featuring interviews with eight of the original Denishawn Dancers and rarely seen footage of the company performing in the 1930s, Ron Honsa’s documentary provides powerful insight into the early days of Jacob’s Pillow and the determination and strength of character needed to build a world-renowned dance institution.

Screening with:
Lar Lubovitch at Jacob’s Pillow
Lawrence Ott, USA, 1981, DCP, 24m
Made to promote the Lar Lubovitch Company abroad, Lawrence Ott’s “time capsule” documentary—rarely screened in the past 35 years—features footage of signature repertory works including  “Exsultate Jubilate,” “Marimba,” “Beau Danube,” and “Cavalcade,” featuring the dancers Peggy Baker, Rob Besserer, and Doug Varone. The choreographer himself appears in interview segments as well as scenes depicting him at work in the studio.
Sunday, February 14, 1:00pm (Moderated discussion with Norton Owen and Ron Honsa)

Our Last Tango
German Kral, Germany/Argentina, 2015, DCP, 84m
Spanish with English subtitles
Our Last Tango is a love story involving perhaps the most famous couple in tango history and their shared passion for the partnered dance. Now in their eighties, María Nieves Rego and Juan Carlos Copes met when they were 14 and 17, respectively, and have danced together for nearly 50 years, memorably in the Broadway smash hit Tango Argentino. Off the dance floor, they loved and hated each other in equal measure, broke up and reunited, but always generated sparks as performing partners. Now toward the end of their lives, the pair share their tempestuous personal history with a group of young tango dancers and choreographers in Buenos Aires, who transform the couple’s personal drama into sizzling dance numbers. Soul-searching interviews and documentary highlights create an unforgettable odyssey into the heart of tango. A Strand Releasing release.
Monday, February 15, 8:30pm

Rare Birds
T.M. Rives, USA, 2015, digital projection, 59m
T.M. Rives’s documentary follows Swedish choreographer Alexander Ekman during the development of his new Swan Lake production for the Norwegian National Ballet. Rarely has there been such intimate access to the creative process; viewers are offered interviews with the opera house’s army of artists and workers as they construct costumes, sets, and even a lake on which the intrepid dancers rehearse, splashing and sliding. Every aspect of this unique production is documented, including the composition of a new score. As challenges mount, the choreographer maintains a playful mood that keeps everything humming when it is not collapsing. While the final performance is unseen, Ekman’s Swan Lake was a triumph and nominated for the Prix Benois de la Danse in 2014. New York Premiere

Screening with:
Bird
Dunja Jocic & Marinus Groothof, Netherlands, 2015, DCP, 17m
Dunja Jocic and Marinus Groothof’s short tells the story of a young boy’s relationship to his pet bird and to his opera diva mother, who leaves him on his own to play, dream, and possibly get into trouble. New York Premiere
Friday, February 12, 1:30pm

They Are We
Emma Christopher, Australia/Sierra Leone/Cuba, 2014, digital projection, 77m
Spanish, Mende, Krio, Gbande, and Kono with English subtitles
In Central Cuba, the Afro-Cuban ethnic group Ganga-Longoba have kept their African heritage alive in distinct song and dance despite their separation from ancestors by decades of slavery, revolution, and religious persecution. Anthropologist and director Emma Christopher films their music, while traveling across Sierra Leone, and shows people the footage to capture their recognition. In a village without road access, one African looks in wonder and says, “They are we.” Music, dance, and interviews reunite the men and women living in Cuba with their Sierra Leone kin in an overdue celebration of their shared history.  An Icarus Films release.

Screening with:
Je suis un Cheval / I am a Horse
Esther Baker-Tarpaga, USA, 2014, digital projection, 12m
In this unique collaboration between dancer/choreographer Ibrahim Zongo and his horse Sabak, the two are filmed along the streets of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, in a duet of incomparable beauty. World Premiere
Monday, February 15, 3:15pm (Q&A with Emma Christopher)

Shorts Program I (TRT: 67m)
The short form continues to gain ground as the ideal platform for exploring the relationship between dance and film. This year’s Short Film programs are currently stretching the boundaries of the art form. The selection includes the concrete and the abstract and reveals that filmmakers and choreographers are partnering in exciting new ways.
Saturday, February 13, 8:00pm

A Tap Dance in a Circle
Danny Gardner, USA, 2015, DCP, 3m
The Tap Stalker strikes again, this time meeting his unassuming friend on the pier and making him tap dance in a circle… in one take! World Premiere

Targeted Advertising
Mitchell Rose, USA, 2015, DCP, 4m
A sci-fi aerial dance film glimpses a dark future where spambot drones chase a fleeing populace and blast ads for Viagra, hair-loss products, and other exciting values. New York Premiere

SajakThor
Chris Rogy, Cambodia, 2014, DCP, 7m
In Hindu mythology, Aspara is a female dancer, here depicted as peacemaker who delivers a message to the people of Cambodia, a country beset by violence.

Abismo
Pablo Diconca, Canada, 2015, DCP, 6m
Drifting on a raft, a man and a woman dance instinctively and choose the only possible escape.
New York Premiere

The Song of GuQin – Chinese Ink
Alex Wu (Zhen Wu), China, 2015, DCP, 5m
Chinese classical dance is rendered through stunning ink-wash drawings in this part of a series honoring ancient Chinese culture and tradition. World Premiere

Tebe Tasi / Sea Dance
David Palazón, Timor-Leste, 2013, DCP, 9m
Tebe Tasi is a visual interpretation of “Itinerary for a landscape, a symphonic poem” performed by the Orquestra Sinfónica de Radiodifusão Portuguesa, conducted by Leonardo Barros, and recorded from a radio broadcasting in 1983 for the album Symphonic Works by Simão Barreto. U.S. Premiere

Indigo Grey: The Passage
Sean Robinson, USA, 2015, DCP, 6m
A young boy discovers a mysterious gas mask that provides a glimpse into an alternate reality.

Still Light
Andrea Ward, USA, 2015, DCP, 3m
Still Light explores the ways in which movement potential and choreographic ideas underwater can differ from those on the ground, touching on concepts of weight and suspension.

Honeymoon
Marta Renzi, USA, 2015, DCP, 6m
Exotic and erotic, playful and provocative, this duet inspired by the Kama Sutra exposes plenty but never takes itself too seriously. New York Premiere

Descent
Drew Cox & Antoine Marc, UK, 2015, DCP, 5m
A man is inhabited by memories and visions as he approaches his final hours. New York Premiere

Approaching the Puddle
Sebastian Gimmel, Germany, 2015, DCP, 9m
A curious woman, appropriately dressed for a rainy day, explores her environment in an empty parking lot. New York Premiere

A Portrait of Marc Brew
Jamiel Laurence & Lewis Landini, Scotland, 2015, DCP, 6m
A light, bright portrait of a choreographer and teacher whose dance vocabulary finds beauty in restricted movement. New York Premiere

Shorts Program II – Experimental Shorts (TRT: 66m)
Tuesday, February 16, 6:00pm

Yachta-Yadda-Yadda
Pooh Kaye, USA, 2013, DCP, 8m
Director Pooh Kaye’s alter ego, Alexandra, struggles with garden machinery and scrambles in the dirt as she pursues her dream of a backyard duck pond. As she launches her boat, magical events sweep her off course. World Premiere

Néants           
Nellie Carrier, Canada, 2015, DCP, 9m
Four characters see their destiny in free fall. New York Premiere

Mortified: The Contender               
Jacob Stage, Camilla Singh & Jenn Goodwin, Canada, 2015, DCP, 6m
Two women become immersed in their emotional responses to a combative world. Adopting the format of a band to encompass a range of activities, the film creates a sonic experience through movement and mayhem. New York Premiere

The Song of GuQin – Hand Dance               
Alex Wu (Zhen Wu), China, 2015, DCP, 5m
From The Song of GuQin series, this segment shows the beauty of hand dance. New York Premiere

Study #1
Gregory Bennett & Jennifer Nikolai, New Zealand, 2015, DCP, 4m
A dance and motion-capture collaboration, this film explores choreographic prompts and improvisation using 3-D motion-capture technology. The live dancer is inscribed into a 3-D visualization, which references both drawing practice and experimental animation–particularly Len Lye and Norman McLaren and their studies in moving image and sound. New York Premiere

Dance of the Neurons   
Jody Oberfelder & Eric Siegel, USA, 2015, DCP, 5m
Twenty-four dancers embody the birth of neurons, activating the brain and body. Created in consultation with leading neuroscientists.

Martian Mating Moves
Eva Ingolf, USA, 2015, DCP, 2m
A short introduction to the mating habits of Martians. World Premiere

Snags in Palladio                
Michele Manzini, Italy, 2015, DCP, 6m
A series of moving tableaux that reflect the Platonic idea of supreme beauty, as well as its contradictory nature in the modern world.New York Premiere

Su misura
Augenblick, Italy, 2014, DCP, 1m
A tailor and his wife. A day like any other: old and new customers, one after another. Then she enters. Suddenly a glimpse, a mistake… and there’s already a stitch to remove: one more word and the elbows will lightly touch. New York Premiere

Little Dreams
Wilkie Branson, UK, 2015, DCP, 7m
A dance animation about dreams, fears, and aspirations made with over 4,000 hand-cut characters. New York Premiere

know you           
Galen Bremer, Emma Hoette & Zoe Rabinowitz, USA, 2015, DCP, 4m
On a gray day, a weathered sculpture in a public space may go unnoticed if not for the figures weaving through it. Are these two women, or one? The mystery of their circumstances ignites a curiosity for the anonymous subject. World Premiere

The Fallen Circus
Shelly Love, UK, 2015, DCP, 10m
Agnes falls from the sky, landing at the feet of a friendly juggler who tells her the story of “The Fallen Circus.” She explains that her mother was blown away by a big gust of wind and together they set off on a journey to find her. U.S. Premiere

Special Program

Dance and Education in New York City High Schools
Featuring PS Dance!, a documentary film about dance education in public schools, directed by award-winning dance filmmaker Nel Shelby, dance ambassador Jody Gottfried Arnhold, and dance education consultant Joan Finkelstein. Proceeded by a screening featuring the finalists from Capturing Motion NYC, Dance Films Association’s workshop and film competition program for high school students throughout the five boroughs.
Saturday, February 13, 11:00am

Free Events

Dance Films Builds an Archive: DFA Member Meet Up! – Free Furman Gallery Event!
In celebration of Dance Films Association’s 60th anniversary, join us for the release of the preliminary results of our recent item level inventory and stories from the organization’s vault. Filmmakers, historians, curators, librarians, programmers, and dance and film enthusiasts alike are encouraged to attend and bring their own stories in seeking, providing, and using archival material.
Sunday, February 14, 12:00pm
Venue: Furman Gallery, 165 West 65th Street

Lincoln Center at the Movies: Great American Dance – Free Amphitheater Event!
Lincoln Center at the Movies: Great American Dance launched in the fall of 2015, distributing recorded live performances of Alvin Ailey, Ballet Hispanico, New York City Ballet, and San Francisco Ballet to more than 600 movie theaters nationwide. Join lead creatives and partners for an in-depth conversation on a transmedia approach to presenting dance in order to “bring incomparable performances representing a diverse range of American dance to audiences everywhere.”
Monday, February 15, 5:00pm
Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center

Luigi: Hollywood, Broadway, and Beyond
Celebrate one of jazz technique’s great innovators, Eugene Louis “Luigi” Faccuito, with a discussion with Francis Roach, who has taught Luigi technique for over 20 years. After a devastating accident, Luigi created an exercise for his own rehabilitation, which became the first complete technique for learning jazz dance. Luigi’s talent and perseverance gave him the opportunity to work in every part of show business, from burlesque to Hollywood musicals, Broadway, and beyond.
Sunday, February 14, 5:00pm
Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center

Meet the Artist With Pat Birch – Free Amphitheater Event!
Honored by Dance Films Association with the 2016 Dance in Focus award, the two-time Emmy Award-winning and five-time Tony nominated choreographer Pat Birch, perhaps best known for being the mastermind behind the hand jive in the film Grease, joins Dance on Camera Festival for Meet the Artist to share insight into her sensational career as one of the most celebrated choreographers for the screen.
Friday, February 12, 5:00pm
Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center

Teaching Screendance: Creating a Practice-Based Pedagogy – Free Amphitheater Event!
Inspired by the hybrid practices of filmmakers Douglas Rosenberg and Katrina McPherson, this open forum focuses on ways in which the practice of screendance—in the context of a theoretical and historical framework—can lead to a pedagogy for teaching the dance genre made for the camera. Rosenberg and McPherson will lead the discussion.
Monday, February 16, 12:00pm
Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center

Work-In-Progress Screening – Free Amphitheater Event!
Centered on process and discussion, this year’s Work-In-Progress screening will feature a selected film from Dance Films Association’s Production Grant application pool. Moderated by Yara Travieso, an award-winning multimedia director, choreographer, and filmmaker.
Saturday, February 13, 5:00pm
Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center

Art Exhibit – Furman Gallery
Jordan Matter: A Matter of Dance
Jordan Matter, a Manhattan-based portrait photographer selected as one of 2014’s “Top Emerging Artists” by Art Business News, is the author of The New York Times bestseller and international phenomenon, Dancers Among Us (Workman Publishing). The book is a collection of photographs of dancers in everyday situations around the world. O, The Oprah Magazine, Barnes & Noble, NPR, and Amazon selected it as a “Best Book,” and it has been reprinted eight times in five countries. Matter and his work have been featured on television and in print and exhibitions throughout the world, including Reddit, Buzzfeed, ABC World News, The Today Show, the BBC, The New York Times, The Huffington Post, The Tyra Banks Show, the Hudson River Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Seoul, Korea (with two solo shows in two years). He is currently working on his follow-up book, Dancers After Dark (Workman Publishing, 2016), featuring a series of public nudes at night meant to highlight the incredible dedication and vulnerability it takes to pursue a dance career. Selections from both projects will be on display.

 

SCHEDULE

Screenings will take place at Walter Reade Theater, 165 W. 65th Street
Panels and free events will take place at Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater, 144 W. 65th Street 

Friday, February 12
1:30PM    Rare Birds (60m) screening with Bird (17m)
3:30PM    Disportrait (52m) screening with Tactum (28m)
5:00PM    Free Panel Discussion: Meet The Artist with Pat Birch
6:00PM    Dance Emergency (52m) screening with The Birch Grove (21m)
8:15PM    Opening Night – The Flight Fantastic (98m) screening with Love Song For Robots (4m)

Saturday, February 13
11:00AM    PS Dance! (53m) screening with Capturing Motion NYC (5m)
1:00PM    Horizons (71m) screening with Cubano Bas (3m)
3:15PM    Ballerina: Program 1 “Body and Soul” (64m) screening with Archive Excerpts (20m)
5:00PM    Free Panel Discussion: Work-In-Progress Screening (60m)
6:00PM    Bajarí (84m)
8:00PM    Shorts Program I (TRT 67m): Targeted Advertising (4m), SajakThor (7m), Abismo (6m), The Song of GuQin – Chinese Ink(5m), Tebe Tasi / Sea Dance (9m), Indigo Grey: The Passage (6m), Still Light (3m), Honeymoon (6m), Descent (5m), Approaching the Puddle (8m), A Portrait of Marc Brew (6m)

Sunday, February 14
1:00PM    The Men Who Danced (60m) screening with Lar Lubovitch at Jacob’s Pillow (25m)
3:15PM    Enter the Faun (68m) screening with Martiality, Not Fighting (13m)
5:00PM    Free Panel Discussion: Luigi: Hollywood, Broadway, and Beyond (60m)
6:00PM    The Dance Goodbye (60m) screening with David (13m)
8:00PM    The Band Wagon (112m)

Monday, February 15
12:00PM    Free Panel Discussion: Teaching Screendance: Creating a Practice-Based Pedagogy (60m)
1:00PM    Bessie: A Portrait of Bessie Schonberg (60m) screening with The GOLDs (34m)
3:15PM    They Are We (77m) screening with Je Suis Un Cheval (12m)
5:00PM    Free Panel Discussion: Lincoln Center at the Movies: Great American Dance (60m)
6:00PM    Lincoln Center at the Movies: Great American Dance – Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater (104m)
8:30PM    Our Last Tango (85m)

Tuesday, February 16
1:00PM    Dance with Them (94m)
3:00PM    After the Curtain (70m) screening with Plow Plant Reap (14m)
6:00PM    Shorts Program II (TRT 66m): Yachta-Yadda-Yadda (8m), Néants (9m), Mortified: The Contender (6m), The Song of GuQin – Hand Dance (6m), Study #1 (4m), Dance of the Neurons (5m), Martian Mating Moves (2m), Snags in Palladio (6m), Su misura (1m),Little Dreams (7m), know you (4m), The Fallen Circus (10m)
9:00PM    Closing Night – Feelings Are Facts: The Life of Yvonne Rainer (82m) screening with Public Displays (4m)

Friday, February 12 – Tuesday, February 16
A Matter of Dance by Jordan Matter – in the Furman Gallery

DANCE FILMS ASSOCIATION
Dance Films Association is dedicated to furthering the art of dance film. Connecting artists and organizations, fostering new works for new audiences, and sharing essential resources, DFA seeks to be a catalyst for innovation in and preservation of dance on camera. This membership service organization was founded in 1956 by Susan Braun.

Dance Films Association and Dance on Camera Festival receive generous support from CORE™, MINDBODY, The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council, The Office of the Mayor Bill De Blasio, and Commissioner Tom Finkelpearl, as well as The New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional support is provided by the Arnhold Foundation and Materials for the Arts.

For more information visit www.dancefilms.org and follow @dancefilms on Twitter.

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
Founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international cinema, the Film Society of Lincoln Center works to recognize established and emerging filmmakers, support important new work, and to enhance the awareness, accessibility, and understanding of the moving image. The Film Society produces the renowned New York Film Festival, a curated selection of the year’s most significant new film work, and presents or collaborates on other annual New York City festivals including Dance on Camera, Film Comment Selects, Human Rights Watch Film Festival, New Directors/New Films, NewFest, New York African Film Festival, New York Asian Film Festival, New York Jewish Film Festival, Open Roads: New Italian Cinema and Rendez-Vous with French Cinema. In addition to publishing the award-winning Film Comment magazine, the Film Society recognizes an artist’s unique achievement in film with the prestigious Chaplin Award, whose 2015 recipient was Robert Redford. The Film Society’s state-of-the-art Walter Reade Theater and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, located at Lincoln Center, provide a home for year-round programs and the New York City film community

 

December 12, 2015 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, Music, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Film/Festival — #FSLC #NEIGHBORING SCENES: NEW LATIN AMERICAN CINEMA, JANUARY 7-10

#FSLC  #NEIGHBORING SCENES:

NEW LATIN AMERICAN CINEMA, JANUARY 7-10

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THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER ANNOUNCES
NEIGHBORING SCENES: NEW LATIN AMERICAN CINEMA, JANUARY 7-10

One North American, two U.S., and eight New York premieres with directors in person

 

The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces Neighboring Scenes, a new showcase of contemporary Latin American cinema co-presented with Cinema Tropical. Launching in the New Year, this selective slate of premieres highlights impressive recent productions from across the region and exhibits the vast breadth of styles, techniques, and approaches employed by Latin American filmmakers today.

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“It’s been some years since Latin American cinema ‘reemerged,’” said Programmer at Large Rachael Rakes. “Now, as the output from countries like Mexico, Argentina, and Brazil continues to be some of the most compelling and engaged cinema today, new scenes are establishing themselves all across the map, showcasing fresh talent and ideas, and challenging the notion of an identifiable contemporary Latin American cinema. We’re pleased to highlight a few of the most impressive recent films from the region.”

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Opening the series is Benjamín Naishtat’s El Movimiento, a stark, black-and-white snapshot of anarchy in 19th-century Argentina and follow-up to his acclaimed debut, History of Fear. Other highlights include the 2015 Cannes Caméra d’Or winner, César Augusto Acevedo’s Land and Shade; the U.S. premiere of Arturo Ripstein’s Bleak Street, which has drawn comparisons to Luis Buñuel’s Mexican period; Rodrigo Plá’s Venice Horizons opener A Monster with a Thousand Heads; Pablo Larraín’s Silver Bear–winning The Club, Chile’s submission for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar; and more.

With titles from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, and Mexico, Neighboring Scenes spans a wide geographic range, evidencing the many sites of contemporary Latin American filmmaking. Some of the featured directors are established auteurs, while others have recently emerged on the international festival scene, snagging top prizes and critical accolades at festivals like Cannes, Berlin, Venice, and Locarno.

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Organized by Rachael Rakes and Dennis Lim.

Tickets go on sale Thursday, December 17 and are $14; $11 for students and seniors (62+); and $9 for Film Society members. See more and save with the $75 All Access Pass or 3+ film discount package. Visit filmlinc.org for more information.

 

FILMS & DESCRIPTIONS

Opening Night
El Movimiento
Benjamín Naishtat, Argentina, 2015, DCP, 70m
Spanish with English subtitles
Continuing his preoccupation with violence and Argentina’s past, Benjamín Naishtat (History of Fear, a New Directors/New Films 2014 selection) dramatizes a crucial moment in that nation’s history characterized by political zealotry and terrorism. Pablo Cedrón portrays the fiery, unhinged leader of a mysterious militia (modeled on Confederacy-era dictator Juan Manuel de Rosas’s Mazorca) who wantonly roam the pampas in an effort to “purify” and unite society, killing and plundering settlers along the way. Characters emerge from and disappear into dark expanses—the film is masterfully shot in black and white—heightening its intense, chilling atmosphere. Funded by the Jeonju Digital Project.
Thursday, January 7, 7:00pm (Q&A with Benjamín Naishtat)

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Pablo Chavarria Gutiérrez, Mexico, 2015, DCP, 60m
Spanish with English subtitles
Marked by a light touch and emphasizing openness over conventional, linear narrative, biologist-turned-filmmaker Pablo Chavarria Gutiérrez documents the rhythms of a man awaiting an important event that never comes. As he cooks breakfast, naps, paints, tries on sunglasses, and wanders through different rooms in his home, Chavarria Guitérrez lovingly frames every action in beautiful natural light, allowing each moment to flow to the next while maintaining its own transcendent essence. North American Premiere

Screening with:
Gulliver
María Alché, Argentina, 2015, DCP, 25m
Spanish with English subtitles

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Flawlessly transitioning from a highly naturalistic family tale to something overtly surreal and back again, Gulliver captures the circumstances—imagined or not—of one of those evenings when siblings come to a deeper understanding of one another. After hanging out at home with their mom (Martín Rejtman regular Susana Pampin) and older sister Mariela (Agustina Muñoz), Agos and Renzo go to a raging party where Agos ends up drinking too much. Upon stepping outside to recover, the pair wander into a strange but familiar landscape, and begin to ask questions about the world and themselves.
Sunday, January 10, 5:00pm

Bleak Street / La calle de la amargura
Arturo Ripstein, Mexico/Spain, 2015, DCP, 99m
Spanish with English subtitles
Based on a true story, the latest feature by Arturo Ripstein is an unflinching look at the mean streets of El Defectuoso. Two prostitutes, Adela (Nora Velázquez) and Dora (Patricia Reyes Spíndola), are burdened by horrible marriages and financial problems stemming from their long-departed youth. In an attempt to make ends meet, they drug and rob dwarf twins (Juan Francisco Longoria and Guillermo López)—who themselves barely scrape by as doubles for professional luchadores. Ripstein masterfully contrasts the grittiness of alleyways and seedy apartments with gliding Steadicam cinematography, siding with neither the victims nor the perpetrators. A Leisure Time Features release. Opens at Film Forum for two weeks, January 20 – February 2. U.S. Premiere
Sunday, January 10, 3:00pm

The Club / El Club
Pablo Larraín, Chile, 2015, DCP, 98m
Spanish with English subtitles
Pablo Larraín (director of No and Post Mortem) continues to explore the long shadows of Chile’s recent past with this quietly scathing film about the Catholic Church’s concealment of clerical misconduct. Four aging former priests peacefully live out their days together in a dumpy seaside town, focused on training their racing greyhound rather than doing penance for their assorted crimes. Their idyll is shattered when a fifth priest arrives and, confronted by one of his victims, commits suicide. A young priest begins an investigation into the retirees’ pasts, setting off a series of events that call into question faith, piety, and complicity. Winner of the Silver Bear at the 2015 Berlinale and Chile’s Oscar submission. A Music Box Films release.
Sunday, January 10, 9:00pm

The Gold Bug, or Victoria’s Revenge / El escarabajo de oro o Victorias Hamnd
Alejo Moguillansky & Fia-Stina Sandlund,

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AlejoMoguillansky

Argentina/Denmark/Sweden, 2014, DCP, 102m
Spanish and Swedish with English and Spanish subtitles
Fusing elements of Edgar Allan Poe’s titular short story and Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, Alejo Moguillansky and Fia-Stina Sandlund’s meta-film follows an Argentine-Swedish co-production in Buenos Aires shooting a biopic of the 19th-century realist author and proto-feminist Victoria Benedictsson. After a hustling actor finds a treasure map detailing the location of ancient gold hidden near a town in the Misiones province named after the 19th-century politician Leandro N. Alem, he successfully persuades the producers to reframe the project as a portrait of the radical Alem (swapping feminist politics for anti-Eurocentric ones) and move the production there—so he can better search for the treasure. Fast-paced and hilariously self-reflexive, the film takes a playful approach to texts and history that is reminiscent of Borges.
Thursday, January 7, 9:00pm

Hopefuls / Aspirantes
Ives Rosenfeld, Brazil, 2015, DCP, 71m
Portuguese with English subtitles
Focused on the alluring promise of wealth and fame that professional soccer holds for Brazilian youth, Ives Rosenfeld’s directorial debut features a host of excellent performances from its cast. Junior (Ariclenes Barroso) ekes out a living working nights at a warehouse while playing by day in an amateur league with his talented best friend Bento (Sergio Malheiros). When Bento gets signed to a professional team, Junior struggles with his crippling jealousy—which becomes heightened by his pregnant girlfriend and alcoholic uncle. Artfully lensed and deliberately paced, the film silently builds toward a legitimately shocking climax that provides a grim reality check.
Sunday, January 10, 7:00pm (Q&A with Ives Rosenfeld)

It All Started at the End / Todo comenzó por el fin
Luis Ospina, Colombia, 2015, DCP, 208m
Spanish with English subtitles
Luis Ospina (The Vampire of Poverty, Paper Tiger) turns the camera toward his radical roots—and his own intestines—for this documentary about the Cali Group, the Colombian artists’ collective that revolutionized art, cinema, and literature amid drug-related terrorism in the 1970s and ’80s. Boasting a wide array of never-before-seen archival material, Ospina (the group’s only surviving member, who was diagnosed with cancer during the making of the film) focuses on telling the stories of co-founders Andrés Caicedo and Carlos Mayolo. Never maudlin or self-important, this kaleidoscopic inside view of “Caliwood” is essential viewing for anyone looking for darkly comic, anarchic inspiration. U.S. Premiere
Saturday, January 9, 2:00pm (Q&A with Luis Ospina)

Ixcanul
Jayro Bustamante, Guatemala, 2015, DCP, 93m
Kaqchikel and Spanish with English subtitles

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Maria (María Mercedes Coroy) is set to marry a much older foreman at the coffee plantation, but she has a crush on Pepe, who has fanciful dreams of getting rich in the U.S. After consummating their flirtation, Pepe leaves for the States—without Maria, who soon learns she is expecting a baby. A difficult pregnancy assisted only by traditional medicine finally leads her to the hectic big city, but on very grim terms. Shot in collaboration with the Kaqchikel Mayans of Guatemala’s coffee-growing highlands, Jayro Bustamante’s exquisitely shot debut feature (winner of a top prize at the Berlinale and Guatemala’s Oscar submission) explores what tradition and modernity mean for women living in marginalized communities. A Kino Lorber release.

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Friday, January 8hade / La, 7:00pm

Land and Shade/La tierra y la sombra
César Augusto Acevedo, Colombia, 2015, DCP, 94m
Spanish with English subtitles
A poetic and devastating statement on how environmental issues impact every aspect of life, César Augusto Acevedo’s Caméra d’Or–winning directorial debut is not to be missed. The elderly Alfonso (Haimer Leal) returns to the small house in Valle del Cauca he left 17 years earlier in order to care for his bedridden son Geraldo (Edison Raigosa), who suffers from a mysterious ailment related to the harsh farming techniques of the sugar-cane plantations around them. Tensions quietly simmer between Alfonso and his ex-wife (the wonderful Hilda Ruiz), but familial ties and pride keep them tied to the land in Acevedo’s meditative and painterly allegory.
Friday, January 8, 9:00pm

Mar
Dominga Sotomayor, Chile, 2014, DCP, 70m
Spanish with English subtitles
Reminiscent of the films of Josephine Decker and Joe Swanberg, this low-key drama centers on the problems between Martin, aka Mar (Lisandro Rodríguez), and his girlfriend, Eli (Vanina Montes). On vacation in the Argentine resort town of Villa Gesell, conflicts arise concerning expectations and long-term commitments—having a baby, home ownership—but get pushed aside or elided. A visit from Martin’s gregarious, wine-guzzling mother and a random act of God threaten to push the couple to breaking point. Dominga Sotomayor matches her characters’ frustrations with the film’s expert framing, which often obscures faces and bodies, visually emphasizing their mutual misunderstanding.
Saturday, January 9, 6:30pm Q&A with Dominga Sotomayor)

A Monster with a Thousand Heads / Un monstruo de mil cabezas
Rodrigo Plá, Mexico, 2015, DCP, 74m
Spanish with English subtitles
Developed in tandem with his wife’s novel of the same title, Rodrigo Plá (The Delay, The Zone) crafts another airtight thriller, this time taking on a health-insurance system that prefers profit to adequate medical care. Refused treatment that would alleviate her terminally ill husband’s pain—yet not the frustrations of dealing with maddening bureaucracy—Sonia (Jana Raluy) snaps and, gun in hand, single-mindedly goes up the chain of command with a vengeance. The series of increasingly harrowing provocations are interspersed with moments of dark comedy, and coalesce into a final, shocking climax.
Saturday, January 9, 8:30pm (Q&A with Rodrigo Plá)

 

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
Founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international cinema, the Film Society of Lincoln Center works to recognize established and emerging filmmakers, support important new work, and to enhance the awareness, accessibility, and understanding of the moving image. The Film Society produces the renowned New York Film Festival, a curated selection of the year’s most significant new film work, and presents or collaborates on other annual New York City festivals including Dance on Camera, Film Comment Selects, Human Rights Watch Film Festival, New Directors/New Films, New York African Film Festival, New York Asian Film Festival, New York Jewish Film Festival, Open Roads: New Italian Cinema and Rendez-Vous with French Cinema. In addition to publishing the award-winning Film Comment magazine, the Film Society recognizes an artist’s unique achievement in film with the prestigious Chaplin Award, whose 2015 recipient was Robert Redford. The Film Society’s state-of-the-art Walter Reade Theater and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, located at Lincoln Center, provide a home for year-round programs and the New York City film community.

December 11, 2015 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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