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Dance/ Music/ Film/ Events — We Recommend BAM Dance Africa May 2017 *bklyn May 20-29, 2017

Make sure you attend the FREE outdoor Bazaar on the weekend!

DanceAfrica 2017 Bazaar

Dance Africa 2017, Bazaar

Rain or Shine!
May 27—May 29, 2017
Performance dates & times
LOCATION:

Ashland Pl / Lafayette Ave

Hours subject to change. Rain or shine.
Free
Saturday May 27, 2017

12pm

BACK

DanceAfrica’s beloved bazaar returns, featuring more than 150 vendors from around the world, offering African, Caribbean, and African-American food, crafts, and fashion. Celebrate the rich and diverse cultural heritage of Africa and its diaspora—and see the streets surrounding BAM transformed into a global marketplace.

Bazaar Hours

Sat, May 27, 12—10pm
Sun, May 28, 12—8pm
Mon, May 29, 12—8pm

(Hours subject to change. Rain or shine.)

<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/9577279/17-MKTING-0605-NEW-DanceAfrica2017-640×359.jpg” alt=”DanceAfrica 2017 ” />DanceAfrica 2017
Dance
DanceAfrica 2017

and
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Dance | Music
DanceAfrica 2017
May 26—May 29, 2017

Performance dates & times
LOCATION:
Peter Jay Sharp Building

BAM Howard Gilman Opera House
RUN TIME: Approx 2hrs with intermission
SUBSCRIPTIONS START AT  $17.50
TICKETS START AT  $25

Buy Tickets

See all on-sale dates
Part of 2017 Winter/Spring Season and DanceAfrica Festival 2017

The Healing Light of Rhythm: Tradition and Beyond
Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam and Artistic Director Emeritus Chuck Davis
Forty years after its inauguration under the artistic direction of Chuck Davis, the nation’s largest festival of African dance returns for a special anniversary celebration. This year’s performance, under the leadership of Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam, is a special curated program that pays tribute to the past, present, and future of the landmark festival and the transformative power of movement.
Members of Philadelphia’s hip-hop based Illstyle & Peace Productions join with members of New York City’s Forces of Nature Dance Theatre and the drummers and dancers of Asase Yaa, performing a joyful collision of traditional and contemporary styles. Then, Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble—a master group of US-based Guinean dancers and musicians—present a spirited showcase of West African culture. Both groups are joined by the BAM/Restoration Dance Youth Ensemble.
Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble
Asase Yaa
Forces of Nature Dance Theatre
llstyle & Peace Productions
BAM/Restoration Dance Youth Ensemble (Brooklyn)
Lighting design by Al Crawford
Sound design by David Margolin Lawson
Costume design by Hopie Lyn Burrows
Read the BAM program notes for Danceafrica 2017

Related Content

Artists
Abdel R. Salaam

Abdel R. Salaam is the Artistic Director for DanceAfrica.

Abdel R. Salaam

DanceAfrica Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam is the executive artistic director and choreographer of Forces of Nature Dance Theatre, which he co-founded in 1981. The company led the historic procession for Nelson and Winnie Mandela on their visit to New York in 1990 and, along with Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, received the 41st annual Audelco Award for Excellence in Black Theater Award as the 2013 Dance Company of the Year.

Salaam has directed and choreographed for theater and television to critical acclaim and has been active in the world of the performing and visual arts since 1955. He has served on the faculties of Lehman College, the American Dance Festival in the US and Korea, Alvin Ailey American Dance Center, and the Chuck Davis Dance Academy. He is currently a director at the Harlem Children’s Zone/Forces of Nature Youth Academy of Dance and Wellness at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Harlem. He has received many awards, including the Monarch Merit Award for Outstanding Achievement in Dance from the National Council for Arts & Culture (1993), the Silver Anniversary Award for Outstanding Achievement in Choreography, Teaching and Performance from Lehman College (1994), and Better Family Life Lifetime Achievement Award in Arts (2000). Salaam is a 2004 New York Foundation for the Arts fellow and was an artist in residence at the Tennessee Performing Art Center from 2003 to 2007.

<a target=”_blank”><img width=”305″ height=”305″ src=”/media/3376500/32163_DanceAfrica_Bio_AbdelSalaam_305x305.jpg” alt=”” /></a>

MORE
Artists
Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble

This Guinea company is led by Artistic Director M’bemba Bangoura.

Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble

Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble comprises 17 master drummers, dancers, and instrumentalists, all from their native country of Guinea. They bring with them the vast knowledge of the traditional music and dance from each region and represent more than 15 different Guinean ethnicities. Wula Artistic Director M’bemba Bangoura, who has played the djembe drum since childhood, has traveled the world as a performer and teacher and is acclaimed for his high level of mastery of the drum. At age 21, he was invited to play for Ballet Djoliba, the national company of Guinea. Since moving to the US in 1992, Bangoura has become an integral part of the drum and dance scene, teaching hundreds of students, many of whom are now teachers themselves. Additionally, Bangoura has choreographed his own works and developed repertory for many dance companies worldwide.

<a target=”_blank”><img width=”305″ height=”305″ src=”/media/9195437/wula-305×305.jpg” alt=”Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble” /></a>Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble

 

Artists
Asase Yaa African American Dance Theater

This company of musicians, dancers, and vocalists was founded by Artistic Director Yao Ababio.

Asase Yaa African American Dance Theater

Asase Yaa African American Dance Theater was founded in 2001 by Artistic Director Yao Ababio. With a diversity of artistic skill, this company of musicians, dancers, and vocalists creates unique productions that mine the richness of the African diaspora. The company has appeared in VH1’s Hip Hop Honors Awards; Sing Your Song, a documentary about Harry Belafonte at the Apollo Theater; DanceAfrica; Kente Arts Alliance in Pittsburgh; and the first annual dance festival at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. In January 2013 Asase Yaa opened its own multi-cultural performing arts facility in Brooklyn.

<a target=”_blank”><img width=”305″ height=”305″ src=”/media/9115594/asae-yaa-305×305.jpg” alt=”Asae Yaa” /></a>Asae Yaa

 

Artists
Forces of Nature Dance Theatre

Forces of Nature performs a blend of contemporary dance and traditional African forms.

Artists

Forces of Nature Dance Theatre

Forces of Nature Dance Theatre Company was founded by Executive Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam, Executive Managing Director Olabamidele Husbands, and company member Dyane Harvey in 1981. The group has produced ballet and concert pieces and offered dance classes and educational programs in New York and throughout the world for over 36 years.

Forces of Nature performs a unique blend of contemporary modern dance, traditional West African and neo-African dance, contemporary ballet, house and hip-hop forms, and martial arts. The company has performed and toured widely throughout the US and abroad. In addition to annual appearances at Aaron Davis Hall, the Apollo Theater, and New Jersey Performing Arts Center, the ensemble has also performed at the Joyce Theater, the American Dance Festival, Cathedral of St. John the Divine, and the International Association of Blacks in Dance (IABD) among others.

Forces of Nature was part of the 12th Annual Festival for Peace in Moscow, the only African-American dance company to engage with members of the Bolshoi Ballet, and had the honor to dance and lead the historical procession for Nelson Mandela during his first appearance in the US in 1990. The company was featured in the three-part PBS series Free to Dance, as part of Great Performances, on the history of black dance in the 20th-century. Forces of Nature was also the featured dance company in the film and Smithsonian exhibition When the Spirit Moves, on the influence of African-American dance in Western culture. And most recently, the company was honored with the 41st annual Vivian Robinson AUDELCO Award for Best Dance Company of 2013

In addition to performing and touring, Forces of Nature has gained national and international recognition for its work with youth of all ages through workshops, master classes, and training seminars. The company has developed ongoing programs offered to schools, community service organizations, and cultural art institutions, believing that the arts, coupled with informative, stimulating academic presentations and creative participation, are among the best educational tools for redirecting youth on a positive, progressive, alternative path.

 

Artists
Illstyle & Peace Productions

This Philadelphia-based dance company was founded in 2000 by Brandon “Peace” Albright.

MORE
Artists
BAM/Restoration Dance Youth Ensemble (Brooklyn)

BAM/Restoration DanceAfrica Ensemble celebrates ancestral roots and the modern-day community.

MORE

Related EVENTS

Neighborhood
Tribute to the Ancestors
Sat, May 20, 2017

Tribute to the Ancestors
Sat, May 20, 2017

This traditional tribute to those who have passed on features music and drumming, dance performances, and a libation ceremony for the ancestors conducted by the DanceAfrica Council of Elders.
MORE

Free

Neighborhood
DanceAfrica Community Day at RestorationART
Sat, May 20, 2017

DanceAfrica Community Day at RestorationART
Sat, May 20, 2017

This year’s festival kicks off with the annual community welcome for the artists, featuring performances by students from RestorationART who have participated in BAM Education’s DanceAfrica program.
MORE

Free

Visual Art
Maeva Kounta: Modernism and Tradition
May 22—Jun 30, 2017

Maeva Kounta: Modernism and Tradition
May 22—Jun 30, 2017

BAM Visual Art presents a new work by Guinean painter and illustrator Maeva Kounta.
MORE

Free

Film Series
FilmAfrica 2017
May 26—May 29, 2017

FilmAfrica 2017
May 26—May 29, 2017

This cinematic companion to the annual DanceAfrica celebration features the best narrative and documentary films from across Africa and beyond, with a special focus on Guinea.

Film Series

FilmAfrica 2017

Le Balon d'or

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May 26—May 29, 2017
BACK
BACK

Part of BAMcinématek and DanceAfrica Festival 2017

Co-presented by the New York African Film Festival

This cinematic companion to the annual DanceAfrica celebration features the best narrative and documentary films from across Africa and beyond, with a special focus on Guinea.

<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8805923/clouds-over-conakry-640×359.jpg” alt=”Clouds Over Conakry, Film Africa” />Clouds Over Conakry, Film Africa
Film
Clouds Over Conakry
Fri, May 26, 2017
Clouds Over Conakry
Fri, May 26, 2017

A young artist is torn between following his father’s path and living his own life.

MOREbuy

<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8805930/rain-the-color-blue-2-640×359.jpg” alt=”Rain The Color Blue, Film Africa” />Rain The Color Blue, Film Africa
Film
Rain the Color of Blue with a Little Red In It
Fri, May 26, 2017
Rain the Color of Blue with a Little Red In It
Fri, May 26, 2017

This homage to Purple Rain, the first narrative feature in the Tuareg language is the universal story of one musician’s struggle to make it against all odds.

MOREbuy

<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8806040/martha-and-niki-640×359.jpg” alt=”Martha And Niki, Film Africa” />Martha And Niki, Film Africa
Film
Martha & Niki
Sat, May 27, 2017
Martha & Niki
Sat, May 27, 2017

This documentary chronicles the incredible story of the first-ever female champions of the largest hip-hop street-dance competition in the world.

MOREbuy

<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8805942/paris-according-to-moussa-640×359.jpg” alt=”Paris According To Moussa, Film Africa” />Paris According To Moussa, Film Africa
Film
Paris According To Moussa
Sat, May 27, 2017
Paris According To Moussa
Sat, May 27, 2017

An immigrant on an important trip finds difficulties and solidarity in France, in this film which was awarded the Human Rights Award by the United Nations.

MOREbuy

<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8826647/guinea-docs-640×359.jpg” alt=”Guinea Docs” />Guinea Docs
Film
Guinean Independence Documentaries
Sun, May 28, 2017
Guinean Independence Documentaries
Sun, May 28, 2017

One of the first African nations to win its independence, this program of rare documentaries gives an intimate first-hand account of life in Guinea in the first years of independence.

MOREbuy

<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8159802/17-CTEK-0026_Le_Balon_Dor_640x359.jpg” alt=”Le Balon d’or” />Le Balon d'or
Film
Le Ballon d’or
Sun, May 28, 2017
Le Ballon d’or
Sun, May 28, 2017

A spirited young boy pursues his dream of becoming a professional soccer player in this vivid, joyous portrait of growing up in West Africa.

MOREbuy

<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8805954/price-of-love-3-640×359.jpg” alt=”Price Of Love, Film Africa” />Price Of Love, Film Africa
Film
Price of Love
Mon, May 29, 2017
Price of Love
Mon, May 29, 2017

A young taxi driver must confront his past when he helps a prostitute out of a fight.

MOREbuy

<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8805936/shorts-program-640×359.jpg” alt=”Shorts Program, Film Africa” />Shorts Program, Film Africa
Film
Shorts Program
Mon, May 29, 2017
Shorts Program
Mon, May 29, 2017

A group of contemporary stories on love and connection in the French-African diaspora.

MOREbuy

You Might Also Enjoy
<img width=”153″ height=”146″ src=”/media/9577283/17-MKTING-0605-NEW-DanceAfrica2017-310×296.jpg” alt=”DanceAfrica 2017 ” />DanceAfrica 2017

 
Neighborhood
DanceAfrica 2017 Bazaar
May 27—May 29, 2017

DanceAfrica 2017 Bazaar
May 27—May 29, 2017
Rain or Shine!

DanceAfrica’s beloved bazaar returns, featuring more than 150 vendors from around the world, offering African, Caribbean, and African-American food, crafts, and fashion.
MORE

Free

Classes
DanceAfrica Master Class
Mon, May 29, 2017

DanceAfrica Master Class
Mon, May 29, 2017

Participants are introduced to West African rhythmic traditions and learn the fundamentals of Guinean movement styles in this immersive workshop.
MORE

Classes
DanceAfrica Family Workshop
Mon, May 29, 2017

DanceAfrica Family Workshop
Mon, May 29, 2017

Caregivers and children alike deepen their engagement with DanceAfrica in this fun-filled, hands-on workshop focusing on Guinean movement and music.
MORE

Iconic BAM Artists
Chuck Davis

Chuck Davis

Chuck Davis (1937—2017) was the founding artistic director of DanceAfrica, BAM’s longest running series, and one of the foremost teachers and choreographers of traditional African dance in America.
MORE
CONTACT
Sign up to receive BAM email

Sign-up for our email lists and receive exclusive ticket offers, discounts, and updates.
Sign up
You Might Also Enjoy

Music
Santana Redux w/ The BRC Orchestra

The all-stars of Black Rock Coalition honor legend Carlos Santana for Cinco De Mayo.
Fri, May 5, 2017

MORE

Free

Music
Rabasi Joss with Soul Inscribed

The beloved funk band returns to BAM with Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Rabasi Joss.
Fri, May 19, 2017

MORE

Free

Photo: Richard Termine and Julieta Cervantes
FOLLOW US
FAQ
Privacy Policy
Press
Contact Us
Visit
Programs
Education
Membership
Support BAM
About
Sign Up
Log in
Cart
Featured
Calendar

Film
Theater
Dance
Music
Opera
Physical Theater
Kids
Visual Art
Literary
Talks
Comedy
Live Broadcast
Galas & Events
Neighborhood
Classes
Dance | Music
DanceAfrica 2017
 

May 26—May 29, 2017

Performance dates & times
LOCATION:
Peter Jay Sharp Building

BAM Howard Gilman Opera House
RUN TIME: Approx 2hrs with intermission
SUBSCRIPTIONS START AT  $17.50
TICKETS START AT  $25

Buy Tickets

See all on-sale dates
Part of 2017 Winter/Spring Season and DanceAfrica Festival 2017

The Healing Light of Rhythm: Tradition and Beyond
Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam and Artistic Director Emeritus Chuck Davis
Forty years after its inauguration under the artistic direction of Chuck Davis, the nation’s largest festival of African dance returns for a special anniversary celebration. This year’s performance, under the leadership of Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam, is a special curated program that pays tribute to the past, present, and future of the landmark festival and the transformative power of movement.
Members of Philadelphia’s hip-hop based Illstyle & Peace Productions join with members of New York City’s Forces of Nature Dance Theatre and the drummers and dancers of Asase Yaa, performing a joyful collision of traditional and contemporary styles. Then, Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble—a master group of US-based Guinean dancers and musicians—present a spirited showcase of West African culture. Both groups are joined by the BAM/Restoration Dance Youth Ensemble.
Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble
Asase Yaa
Forces of Nature Dance Theatre
llstyle & Peace Productions
BAM/Restoration Dance Youth Ensemble (Brooklyn)
Lighting design by Al Crawford
Sound design by David Margolin Lawson
Costume design by Hopie Lyn Burrows
Read the BAM program notes for Danceafrica 2017

Related Content

Artists
Abdel R. Salaam

Abdel R. Salaam is the Artistic Director for DanceAfrica.

MORE
Artists
Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble

This Guinea company is led by Artistic Director M’bemba Bangoura.

MORE
Artists
Asase Yaa African American Dance Theater

This company of musicians, dancers, and vocalists was founded by Artistic Director Yao Ababio.

MORE
Artists
Forces of Nature Dance Theatre

Forces of Nature performs a blend of contemporary dance and traditional African forms.

MORE
Artists
Illstyle & Peace Productions

This Philadelphia-based dance company was founded in 2000 by Brandon “Peace” Albright.

MORE
Artists
BAM/Restoration Dance Youth Ensemble (Brooklyn)

BAM/Restoration DanceAfrica Ensemble celebrates ancestral roots and the modern-day community.

MORE

Related EVENTS

Neighborhood
Tribute to the Ancestors
Sat, May 20, 2017

Tribute to the Ancestors
Sat, May 20, 2017

This traditional tribute to those who have passed on features music and drumming, dance performances, and a libation ceremony for the ancestors conducted by the DanceAfrica Council of Elders.
MORE

Free

Neighborhood
DanceAfrica Community Day at RestorationART
Sat, May 20, 2017

DanceAfrica Community Day at RestorationART
Sat, May 20, 2017

This year’s festival kicks off with the annual community welcome for the artists, featuring performances by students from RestorationART who have participated in BAM Education’s DanceAfrica program.
MORE

Free

Visual Art
Maeva Kounta: Modernism and Tradition
May 22—Jun 30, 2017

Maeva Kounta: Modernism and Tradition
May 22—Jun 30, 2017

BAM Visual Art presents a new work by Guinean painter and illustrator Maeva Kounta.
MORE

Free

Film Series
FilmAfrica 2017
May 26—May 29, 2017

FilmAfrica 2017
May 26—May 29, 2017

This cinematic companion to the annual DanceAfrica celebration features the best narrative and documentary films from across Africa and beyond, with a special focus on Guinea.
MORE

Neighborhood
DanceAfrica 2017 Bazaar
May 27—May 29, 2017

DanceAfrica 2017 Bazaar
May 27—May 29, 2017
Rain or Shine!

DanceAfrica’s beloved bazaar returns, featuring more than 150 vendors from around the world, offering African, Caribbean, and African-American food, crafts, and fashion.
MORE

Free

Classes
DanceAfrica Master Class
Mon, May 29, 2017

DanceAfrica Master Class
Mon, May 29, 2017

Participants are introduced to West African rhythmic traditions and learn the fundamentals of Guinean movement styles in this immersive workshop.
MORE

Classes
DanceAfrica Family Workshop
Mon, May 29, 2017

DanceAfrica Family Workshop
Mon, May 29, 2017

Caregivers and children alike deepen their engagement with DanceAfrica in this fun-filled, hands-on workshop focusing on Guinean movement and music.
MORE

Iconic BAM Artists
Chuck Davis

Chuck Davis

Chuck Davis (1937—2017) was the founding artistic director of DanceAfrica, BAM’s longest running series, and one of the foremost teachers and choreographers of traditional African dance in America.
MORE
CONTACT
Sign up to receive BAM email

Sign-up for our email lists and receive exclusive ticket offers, discounts, and updates.
Sign up
You Might Also Enjoy

MORE

Free

Music
Rabasi Joss with Soul Inscribed

The beloved funk band returns to BAM with Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Rabasi Joss.
Fri, May 19, 2017

MORE

Free

Photo: Richard Termine and Julieta Cervantes
FOLLOW US
FAQ
Privacy Policy
Press
Contact Us

 

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May 18, 2017 Posted by | #dance, ART, avant-garde, BUSINESS, CULTURE, Dance, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, FOOD AND WINE, GUIDES, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, Music, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2017 Shakespeare In The Park -05/23-08/13/17 *NYC

Free for all. All summer. Every summer.

Watch the announcement of Free Shakespeare in the Park on Facebook Live.

JULIUS CAESAR
Directed by Oskar Eustis

May 23- June 18

The Public Theater’s Artistic Director Oskar Eustis directs Julius Caesar, Shakespeare’s play of politics and power, last seen in the Park 17 years ago. Rome’s leader, Julius Caesar, is a force unlike any the city has seen. Magnetic, populist, irreverent, he seems bent on absolute power. A small band of patriots, devoted to the country’s democratic traditions, must decide how to oppose him. Shakespeare’s political masterpiece has never felt more contemporary.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM
Directed by Lear deBessonet

July 11- August 13

In July, the Delacorte Theater will transform into the most enchanted forest in all of theater in Shakespeare’s beloved comedy, A Midsummer Night’s Dream. When the merry sprite Puck meddles with a magical love potion, young lovers lost in the woods mysteriously find themselves infatuated with the wrong person in this hilarious, fairytale fantasia that proves the course of true love never did run smooth. Lear deBessonet, Founder of the groundbreaking Public Works program and Resident Director, brings her electric theatrical vision to the classic romance about the supernatural nature of love.

Free tickets to Shakespeare in the Park will be available on every day there is a public performance. Visit shakespeareinthepark.org for more info.


Lead support for Free Shakespeare in the Park provided by
Bank of America and The Jerome L. Greene Foundation.

Additional support provided by Bloomberg Philanthropies, Delta Air Lines, TodayTix, The Kimberly, The New York Times, Outfront Media, WNYC, ABC7, Theatermania, NYC Parks, New York City Department Of Cultural Affairs, The New York State Council On The Arts, and Art Works. 

Special support provided by The New York Community Trust- The George T. Delacorte Fund for Performance at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park.

The Philip and Janice Levin Foundation provides support for The Public’s access and engagement programming. The LuEsther T. Mertz Charitable Trustprovides  leadership support for The Public Theater’s year-round activities.

Photos by Joseph Moran and Tammy Shell

February 11, 2017 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , | Leave a comment

We Recommend New Publications from poet Anne Whitehouse!

Poem, Calligraphies, won the 2016 Songs of Eretz poetry prize. Please read the poem and comments by judge Carol Hamilton. You can also see a wonderful video of Cai Guo-Qiang’s Ladder of Fire on the website.

 

Poems, Finitudes, Dust Motes, Elegy (for Wendy), and A Backward Glance , are published in Ginosko Literary Journal. Please go to pp.237-241 for Anne’s poems.

 

Poem Preserves and poem The “E-E-E-E-E-E” are published in riverbabble.

 

Poem A Fire in Winter is published in The Greensilk Journal. Anne’s poem is the third poem on this page.

 

Poems, A Few Things I Learned From My Mother-in-Law and My Last Spring in My House and Garden are published in The Basil O’Flaherty.

 

Poem, The Mask is published in Cyclamens and Swords. Scroll down to find the poem.

 

Poem After the Apocalypse is published in Young Ravens Literary Review.

 

Poems, The Secret and One Summer Day on the Number One Train are published in By&By Poetry, issue 3.

 

Short story, City Cyclist is published in Ride 3.

CONGRATULATIONS, Anne!

Happy reading, everyone!

 

April 3, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, LIFESTYLES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

DANCE SYMPOSIUM : Town Hall: Perspectives on Cultural Identity in Dance 4/4/16 *nyc

Monday, April 4, 2016

Town Hall: Perspectives on Cultural Identity in Dance

This notice provided by the kind folks at : Dance/NYC

Monday, April 4, 2016
5:00-8:00 p.m.
#townhall

City College Center for the Arts
Aaron Davis Hall, Marian Anderson Theater
West 135th Street and Convent Avenue
Harlem, NY 10031
Directions

Wheelchair Accessible
Register: Register now. Requests for reasonable accommodations should be made in advance by contacting Dance/NYC at 212.966.4452 (Voice only) specialevents@dance.nyc.


The Harlem Arts Alliance (HAA), in partnership with Elisa Monte Dance, the City College Center for the Arts, Dance/NYC and Women of Color in the Arts (WOCA), present a DANCE-focused TOWN HALL meeting that includes:

 

 

 


Dance Resource Station Providers:

   

       


 

           

Dance/NYC Town Halls are supported in part by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. They are also made possible, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council, and from the National Endowment for the Arts. Consolidated Edison is the lead corporate sponsor.

HAA Dance is made possible with support from the Mertz Gilmore Foundation.


(Photo credit: Elisa Monte Dance by Matthew Murphy)

March 29, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

THE WIRE CONFERENCE 4/8-9/16 *nyc

The Wire Conference

Friday, April 8, 2016 – Saturday, April 9, 2016

Location

Panels 1-5: 301 Pulitzer Hall
Panels 6-7: 501 Schermerhorn Hall
Panels 8 and 9: Cowin Auditorium, Teachers College

Registration

Panels 1-7: Free and Open to the Public; No Registration
Panels 8-9: Purchase tickets here: wireconference.brownpapertickets.com

Description

A consideration of the achievement, the afterlife, and the legacies of the HBO series The Wire—by some of the actors, writers, and musicians who created it, the academics who teach and study it, and those who in their communities continue to engage the issues it raises. The conference will culminate in a ticketed “Actors and Activism” panel, featuring actors from The Wire, and a performance by the Moving Mountains Theater Company, a nonprofit organization that trains inner city youth in the performing arts, founded by The Wire star Jamie Hector.

Although critically acclaimed from the start, the HBO series The Wire was far less widely viewed during its original presentation (2002-08) than it has been in the succeeding years.  It is one of the very few television series that has become both more popular and more revered over time–consistently ranking on top-ten lists as one of the best series in television history—despite never having been heavily publicized or available for viewing free of charge.  And it is the only series to have been so widely incorporated into the academic curriculum in both the US and abroad.  For almost a decade, The Wire has been showing up on the syllabi of courses in sociology, English, African-American Studies, anthropology, film, education, religion, law, urban studies, criminal justice, and media studies at Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Duke, UC Berkeley, Middlebury, Rutgers-Newark, University of Washington-Spokane, Syracuse, Loyola University New Orleans, University of Michigan (and the list of both disciplines and institutions goes on).

This two-day conference considers the afterlife and legacies of The Wire. For those involved with its creation, the experience of The Wire was unusually transformative.  The same might be said for those who study and learn from it.  What accounts for the unique status of The Wire as an object of multi-disciplinary inquiry?  Why does it appeal so strongly to those in the academy, and increasingly so as the years go by? In what ways has its unusual degree of creative collaboration led to other forms of collaborative work for creators and consumers (community activism, public humanities, team-teaching across disciplines)?  How does its status as a multi-part realist narrative (written as a whole rather than season by season) shape how we read it?  What effect does its subtly traversing the borderline between fact and fiction have on interpretation?

Friday panels address teaching The Wire and the issues it raises in different contexts; scholarship on The Wire, focusing on questions of seriality and narrative experience (including Linda Williams, Frank Kelleter, and Jason Mittell); a discussion about “immersive journalism” with June Cross, Leon Dash, Lynnell Hancock, among others, and the systemic urban problems that most affect the economically disadvantaged; and a “public square” panel, organized by Sheri Parks (University of MD), on Baltimore as a site for examining the interplay of race, racism, and the roles of the police, city officials, black youth (profiled as such), and other community actors.  There will be an early evening discussion and performance of music from The Wire, organized by the composer Blake Leyh, the music producer of The Wire.

Saturday sessions focus on mass incarceration and the school-to-prison pipeline (organized by the Center for Justice at Columbia); the intersection of race, religion, and politics in the inner city (organized by the Institute for Research in African-American Studies); actors and activism (a roundtable organized by Jamie Hector and including other Wire activist-actors).  There will be an early evening performance by the Moving Mountains Theatre Company.

Conference Schedule

Friday, 8 April 2016 – 8:30am-7:00pm 305 Pulitzer Hall | Free and open to the public

Coffee and Opening Remarks – 8:30am-9:30am

  1. Teaching The Wire – 9:30am-11:00am
    Organized by the Heyman Center for the Humanities
    Fran Bartowski, University of New Jersey, Newark Sherri-Ann Butterfield, University of New Jersey, Newark Toby Gordon, Johns Hopkins University
    Arvind Rajagopal, New York University
    Moderator: Marcellus Blount, Columbia University
  2. Break – 11:00am-11:15am
  3. Seriality and Narrative Experience – 11:15am-12:45pm Organized by the Film Division, School of the Arts Frank Kelleter, Freie Universität, Berlin
    Jason Mittell, Middlebury College
  4. Linda Williams, University of California, Berkeley

Lunch – 12:45pm-2:00pm

  1. Immersion Journalism – 2:00pm-3:30pm Organized by the School of Journalism June Cross, Columbia University Andrea Elliott, New York Times LynNell Hancock, Columbia University Others TBABreak – 3:30pm-3:45pm
  2. Baltimore Stories in the “Public Square” – 3:45pm-5:15pm Organized by Sheri Parks, University of Maryland
    Sheri Parks, University of Maryland
    Other panelists TBA
  3. Break – 5:15pm-5:30pm
  4. Music from The Wire – 5:30pm-7:00pm
    Organized by Blake Leyh, Musical Supervisor on The Wire Juan Donovan Bell, Darkroom Productions
    Blake Leyh, Musical Supervisor on The Wire
    Others TBA

Saturday, 9 April 2016 – Morning Panels 501 Schermerhorn Hall | Free and open to the public

  1. Mass Incarceration and the School-to-Prison Pipeline – 10:00am-11:30am Organized by the Center for Justice
    Mariame Kaba, Project Nia
    Desmond U. Patton, Columbia University Break – 11:30am-11:45am
  2. Carla Shedd, Columbia University Columbia JustArts program participants
  3. Religion, Race, Politics in the Inner City – 11:45am-1:15pm
    Organized and Moderated by the Institute for Research on African American Studies: Monica R. Miller, Lehigh University
    Michael Leo Owens, Emory University
    Josef Sorett, Columbia University
    Rev. LaKeesha Walrond, First Corinthian Baptist Church, New York City
    Joseph R. Winters II, Duke University
  4. Lunch – 1:15pm-3:00pm

Saturday, 9 April 2016 – Afternoon/Evening Panels Cowin Auditorium, Horace Mann Hall, Teachers College
GA Tickets: $15; Student Tickets: $7 | Click here to purchase tickets All proceeds support Moving Mountains Theater Company

  1. Actors and Activism – 3:00pm-4:30pm
    A roundtable featuring actors from The Wire, organized by Jamie Hector Jamie Hector
    Felicia Pearson
    Wendell Pierce
    Sonja Sohn
    Moderator: Jamal Joseph, Columbia University
  2. Intermission – 4:30pm-5:00pm
  3. Performance by the Moving Mountains Theater Company 5:00pm-6:30pm

Sponsors

Heyman Center for the Humanities; School of the Arts; Center for Justice; School of Journalism; Institute for Research in African-American Studies

 

March 28, 2016 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

SYMPOSIA — CENTER of JUSTICE — Upcoming Events 3/29 (Mass Incarceration), 4/7-9 (Black Girl Movement), 4/8-9 (The Wire Conference)*nyc

3 Strong Conferences in NYC worth your time, travel and participation.

Mobility and Confinement: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Incarceration in America

March 29, 2016 9:15am – 5:00pm

Tuesday, March 29, 2016  9:15am – 5:00pm

Second Floor Common Room

This one-day conference explores one of the most important political, economic, and legal problems in contemporary American society: mass incarceration. Assembled under the broadly defined theme of “Mobility and Confinement,” the conference addresses a wide range of issues of central importance to the notion of incarceration, such as economic mobility and poverty; the detention of migrants and refugees; the regulation of drug trafficking and the war on drugs; and the war on terror. Presenters at this conference come from various academic disciplines, including History, Sociology, and Law, under the shared goal of provoking an interdisciplinary discussion of the complex issues of incarceration, criminal justice, and human rights.

Registration

Free and open to the public

No registration necessary

First come, first seated

 

Sponsors

Heyman Center for the Humanities

Society of Fellows in the Humanities

Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race

Center for Justice

The Ladies of Hope Ministries

Organizers

Hidetaka Hirota, Society of Fellows, Columbia University

Participants

Schedule for March 29, 2016

  • 9:15am9:30am
    Opening
  • 9:30am11:30amImprisonment and Poverty
    • “Welfare Fraud and the Criminalization of Family Poverty in the 1970s”Julilly Kohler-HausmannCornell University
    • “‘You’re in a room full of addicts!’ Prisoner reentry as a social institution and the ‘making up’ of the ex-offender”Reuben J. MillerUniversity of Michigan
    • “Maternal Incarceration and Family Functioning in Fragile Families”Kristin TurneyUniversity of California, Irvine
  • 11:30am
    Lunch Break
  • 12:30pm2:30pmArresting and Detaining Migrants
    • “Caged Birds: Immigration Control and the Rise of Mexican Imprisonment in the United States”Kelly Lytle HernándezUniversity of California, Los Angeles
    • “Legal Attitudes of Immigrant Detainees”Emily RyoUniversity of Southern California Gould School of Law
    • “Detaining Children: Looking for Wrongs in All the Right Places”Juliet StumpfLewis & Clark Law School
  • 2:30pm
    Coffee Break
  • 2:45pm4:45pmThe War on Drugs, The War on Terror
    • “The Carceral City: Los Angeles, Race and Punishment in the Neoliberal Era”Donna MurchRutgers University
    • “Preemptive Policies and Self-Fulfilling Prophecies: How National Policymakers Fought Urban Crime”Elizabeth HintonHarvard University
    • “Renditions to Kafka-land: The Case of Mohamedou Ould Slahi”Michael WelchRutgers University
  • 4:45pm Closing
  • 5:00pm

The Wire Conference

Friday, April 8, 2016 – Saturday, April 9, 2016

The Wire Conference

Friday, April 8, 2016 – Saturday, April 9, 2016

Location

Panels 1-5: 301 Pulitzer Hall
Panels 6-7: 501 Schermerhorn Hall
Panels 8 and 9: Cowin Auditorium, Teachers College

Registration

Panels 1-7: Free and Open to the Public; No Registration
Panels 8-9: Purchase tickets here: wireconference.brownpapertickets.com

Description

A consideration of the achievement, the afterlife, and the legacies of the HBO series The Wire—by some of the actors, writers, and musicians who created it, the academics who teach and study it, and those who in their communities continue to engage the issues it raises. The conference will culminate in a ticketed “Actors and Activism” panel, featuring actors from The Wire, and a performance by the Moving Mountains Theater Company, a nonprofit organization that trains inner city youth in the performing arts, founded by The Wire star Jamie Hector.

Although critically acclaimed from the start, the HBO series The Wire was far less widely viewed during its original presentation (2002-08) than it has been in the succeeding years.  It is one of the very few television series that has become both more popular and more revered over time–consistently ranking on top-ten lists as one of the best series in television history—despite never having been heavily publicized or available for viewing free of charge.  And it is the only series to have been so widely incorporated into the academic curriculum in both the US and abroad.  For almost a decade, The Wire has been showing up on the syllabi of courses in sociology, English, African-American Studies, anthropology, film, education, religion, law, urban studies, criminal justice, and media studies at Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Duke, UC Berkeley, Middlebury, Rutgers-Newark, University of Washington-Spokane, Syracuse, Loyola University New Orleans, University of Michigan (and the list of both disciplines and institutions goes on).

This two-day conference considers the afterlife and legacies of The Wire. For those involved with its creation, the experience of The Wire was unusually transformative.  The same might be said for those who study and learn from it.  What accounts for the unique status of The Wire as an object of multi-disciplinary inquiry?  Why does it appeal so strongly to those in the academy, and increasingly so as the years go by? In what ways has its unusual degree of creative collaboration led to other forms of collaborative work for creators and consumers (community activism, public humanities, team-teaching across disciplines)?  How does its status as a multi-part realist narrative (written as a whole rather than season by season) shape how we read it?  What effect does its subtly traversing the borderline between fact and fiction have on interpretation?

Friday panels address teaching The Wire and the issues it raises in different contexts; scholarship on The Wire, focusing on questions of seriality and narrative experience (including Linda Williams, Frank Kelleter, and Jason Mittell); a discussion about “immersive journalism” with June Cross, Leon Dash, Lynnell Hancock, among others, and the systemic urban problems that most affect the economically disadvantaged; and a “public square” panel, organized by Sheri Parks (University of MD), on Baltimore as a site for examining the interplay of race, racism, and the roles of the police, city officials, black youth (profiled as such), and other community actors.  There will be an early evening discussion and performance of music from The Wire, organized by the composer Blake Leyh, the music producer of The Wire.

Saturday sessions focus on mass incarceration and the school-to-prison pipeline (organized by the Center for Justice at Columbia); the intersection of race, religion, and politics in the inner city (organized by the Institute for Research in African-American Studies); actors and activism (a roundtable organized by Jamie Hector and including other Wire activist-actors).  There will be an early evening performance by the Moving Mountains Theatre Company.

Conference Schedule

Friday, 8 April 2016 – 8:30am-7:00pm 305 Pulitzer Hall | Free and open to the public

Coffee and Opening Remarks – 8:30am-9:30am

  1. Teaching The Wire – 9:30am-11:00am
    Organized by the Heyman Center for the Humanities
    Fran Bartowski, University of New Jersey, Newark Sherri-Ann Butterfield, University of New Jersey, Newark Toby Gordon, Johns Hopkins University
    Arvind Rajagopal, New York University
    Moderator: Marcellus Blount, Columbia University
  2. Break – 11:00am-11:15am
  3. Seriality and Narrative Experience – 11:15am-12:45pm Organized by the Film Division, School of the Arts Frank Kelleter, Freie Universität, Berlin
    Jason Mittell, Middlebury College
  4. Linda Williams, University of California, Berkeley

Lunch – 12:45pm-2:00pm

  1. Immersion Journalism – 2:00pm-3:30pm Organized by the School of Journalism June Cross, Columbia University Andrea Elliott, New York Times LynNell Hancock, Columbia University Others TBABreak – 3:30pm-3:45pm
  2. Baltimore Stories in the “Public Square” – 3:45pm-5:15pm Organized by Sheri Parks, University of Maryland
    Sheri Parks, University of Maryland
    Other panelists TBA
  3. Break – 5:15pm-5:30pm
  4. Music from The Wire – 5:30pm-7:00pm
    Organized by Blake Leyh, Musical Supervisor on The Wire Juan Donovan Bell, Darkroom Productions
    Blake Leyh, Musical Supervisor on The Wire
    Others TBA

Saturday, 9 April 2016 – Morning Panels 501 Schermerhorn Hall | Free and open to the public

  1. Mass Incarceration and the School-to-Prison Pipeline – 10:00am-11:30am Organized by the Center for Justice
    Mariame Kaba, Project Nia
    Desmond U. Patton, Columbia University Break – 11:30am-11:45am
  2. Carla Shedd, Columbia University Columbia JustArts program participants
  3. Religion, Race, Politics in the Inner City – 11:45am-1:15pm
    Organized and Moderated by the Institute for Research on African American Studies: Monica R. Miller, Lehigh University
    Michael Leo Owens, Emory University
    Josef Sorett, Columbia University
    Rev. LaKeesha Walrond, First Corinthian Baptist Church, New York City
    Joseph R. Winters II, Duke University
  4. Lunch – 1:15pm-3:00pm

Saturday, 9 April 2016 – Afternoon/Evening Panels Cowin Auditorium, Horace Mann Hall, Teachers College
GA Tickets: $15; Student Tickets: $7 | Click here to purchase tickets All proceeds support Moving Mountains Theater Company

  1. Actors and Activism – 3:00pm-4:30pm
    A roundtable featuring actors from The Wire, organized by Jamie Hector Jamie Hector
    Felicia Pearson
    Wendell Pierce
    Sonja Sohn
    Moderator: Jamal Joseph, Columbia University
  2. Intermission – 4:30pm-5:00pm
  3. Performance by the Moving Mountains Theater Company 5:00pm-6:30pm

Sponsors

Heyman Center for the Humanities; School of the Arts; Center for Justice; School of Journalism; Institute for Research in African-American Studies

Events From Our Partners and Friends

BLACK GIRL MOVEMENT CONFERENCE

April 7 @ 5:00 pm – April 9 @ 7:00 pm

DATE & TIME:
THURSDAY, APRIL 07, 2016 5:00PM TO SATURDAY, APRIL 09, 2016 7:00PMApril 7- 9, 2016
ImageNation Cinema Organization | RAW SPACE2031 Adam Clayton Powell Jr Blvd, (Between 121street & 122street)
New York, NY 10027
“Black Girl Movement: A National Conference” is a three-day gathering at Columbia University in New York City to focus on Black girls, cis, queer, and trans girls, in the United States.   Bringing together artists, activists, educators, policymakers, and black girls leaders themselves, this first national conference on Black girls seeks to address the disadvantages that Black girls in the United States face, while creating the political will to publicly acknowledge their achievements, contributions, and leadership.
Black girls are among the most significant cultural producers, community connectors, and trendsetters, rarely are their contributions recognized or appreciated. At best, they remain invisible in our public discourse or people assume that all Black girls are doing fine and are “resilient” enough to overcome any structural obstacles put in their way. Nevertheless, the vast majority of Black girls in the United States are in crisis. They face significant barriers to educational achievement, economic and political equality, and are the recipients of deeply embedded racial and gender biases in the media, public policy, philanthropy, and research.
As a result, the planning of this conference has been done by an intergenerational and cross-institution coalition because the most innovative work being done on and with black girls often are in silos and without the full benefits of a collaboration, funding, and public visibility.  “Black Girl Movement” is an opportunity change that reality through raising public consciousness, advancing research, policy, and community programming, and developing a resource sharing platform.  Most importantly, this conference will highlight Black girls’ agency and ingenuity in order to elevate their voices and solutions toward improving the life outcomes of Black girls in the United States.

Location: Columbia University, Morningside Campus

Program Schedule >>>
♦Black Girlhood Exhibition >>>
♦Panelist >>>
Co-Sponsors >>>
♦Planning Committee>>>

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

The Black Girl Movement is proud to have the following organizations as Co-Sponsors.

Columbia University Institute for Research in African-American Studies
Columbia University Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality
Columbia University Office of the President
Dean for Social Sciences Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University
Fordham University African and African American Studies
A Long Walk Home
The Brotherhood/Sister Sol
Camille A. Brown & Dancers
Girls for Gender Equity
The Novo Foundation

.

March 27, 2016 Posted by | CULTURE, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

BASQUIAT Symposium! BASQUIAT: Still Fly@55 Symposium Saturday 3/26/16 BKLYN! #FREE

Wonderful, knowledgeable speakers makes this symposium a fun appreciation of an artist whose interpretations of African art and symbols still astonishes the Art World.

Basquiat Still Fly image

Michaela angela Davis speaks at the 10am panel.

 

 

March 25, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

THEATER — The Lark — The New Black Fest at The Lark — March 14-19, 2016 *nyc

 new Black Fest at the Lark 2016
 The Larka 22-year-old play development lab dedicated to expanding the range of perspectives represented on stage in the United States, is proud to announce the continuation of its partnership with The New Black Fest, a theater organization celebrating provocative storytelling, film and discussion from the African Diaspora. The New Black Fest at The Larka week-long festival, will feature the following artists and their works: Actor and playwright Jocelyn Bioh (Schoolgirls; or The African Mean Girls Play) whose work has appeared on The Kilroy’s List; Co-founder of Team Play Eric Holmes (Pornplay; or Blessed Are the Meek); Poet, playwright and Ruby Prize Winner Lenelle Moïse (Merit); Actor, playwright and an alumnus of the Emerging Writers Group at the Public Theater NSangou Njikam (When We Left); and actor and playwright Lisa Rosetta Strum, whose one-person play She Gon’ Learn won a Best Solo Show Award at the United Solo Festival at Theatre Row last fall.

The partnership between The New Black Fast and The Lark is both organic and essential.  Both organizations are committed to creating community and movement around new work that contributes to the representation of a contemporary national vision. The Lark’s mission centers on the belief that targeted support for historically underrepresented playwrights is crucial to a culture of equity, access and inclusion, and a theatrical field that represents the vibrancy of our collective voices.

“As our country and theater community continue their fight for complexity and equity, I am beyond thrilled to continue our relationship with The Lark that believes the creative well-being of the playwright is central to everything,” said Keith Josef Adkins, Artistic Director and Co-founder of The New Black Fest.

Through a diverse portfolio of fellowships, residencies, and workshops, The Lark has provided a platform for voices to enter the evolving national repertoire.  Recent plays substantially developed at The Lark include Dominique Morisseau’s Skeleton Crew, Mona Mansour’s The Way West, Rajiv Joseph’s Guards at the Taj, and Katori Hall’s The Mountaintop.

“The current trend in which funds are systematically redirected from smaller, culturally explicit theater companies to larger, predominately white-led institutions, ostensibly for the sake of ‘efficiency,’ hampers diverse leadership in the arts and dampens voices and perspectives that are critical to a free society” said John Clinton Eisner, The Lark’s Artistic Director.  “Working with The New Black Fest is core to our mission of championing the next wave of innovative theater artists and leaders by putting them in the driver’s seat to leverage public awareness and financial resources.”

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and The New Black Fest’s advisory board member Lynn Nottage, who was The Lark’s 2013-14 Writer-in-Residence, told The New York Times, “This [event] is not about separation, it’s about inclusion. It’s about inviting people who don’t get access.”

Public readings of these new works and a kick-off panel, “The White Gaze, the Truth Gaze and a New Revolution,” will take place March 14 – March 19 at The Lark’s BareBones® Studio, located at 311 West 43rd Street, 5th Floor, in New York City.

The New Black Fest is supported in part by a special grant from the Ford Foundation.

Additional support provided through grants to The Lark from the New York State Council on the Arts, a State Agency, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Monday, March 14 @7pm
Kick Off Panel: THE WHITE GAZE, THE TRUTH GAZE AND A NEW REVOLUTION
This event will be followed by a reception.  Moderator and panelists to be announced.

Tuesday, March 15 @7pm
SHE GON’ LEARN
by Lisa Rosetta Strum

With old school wisdom, her childhood, a string of bad dates, and a one night stand gone wrong with a smooth talking would be ex-boyfriend, Lisa navigates her personal mishaps with poetry, comedy and poignancy on her journey to discover self-love.

Wednesday, March 16 @7pm
MERIT
by Lenelle Moïse 

Nestled in small-town Vermont, Merit follows Mona, the only student of color (and Southerner) in a prestigious MFA Fiction program. When she befriends distinguished professor Dr. Sive, they struggle to strike a balance between passion and professionalism, power and trust.

Thursday, March 17 @7pm
PORNPLAY; or BLESSED ARE THE MEEK
by Eric Holmes

Pornplay: or, Blessed Are the Meek is a dark, comedic plantation drama about how the legacy of slavery plays into our sexual desires and online-avatars. The story centers around the hiring of Austin, a Black veteran, by the mysterious porn mogul, Bob 3, to build a swimming pool for his renovated estate in Virginia. When Austin meets Bob 3’s pornstar wife, Sephie, and Jackie, her gender-fluid son, their lives, races and desires intersect to reveal the horrifying truths of sex, history, and power.

Friday, March 18 @7pm
SCHOOLGIRLS; or THE AFRICAN MEAN GIRLS PLAY
by Jocelyn Bioh

Inspired from actual events, School Girls is set at the prestigious Aburi Girls Boarding School and tells the story of Paulina, the most popular (mean) girl in school, and Ericka, the new girl with a unique background. Stakes run high as Paulina and Ericka face off in a battle of wits and beauty as they compete to be named Miss Ghana 1985.

Saturday, March 19 @7pm
WHEN WE LEFT
by NSangou Njikam

In the near-future, a secret organization puts out a call to Black Americans: leave America and return to Africa. This extraordinary call promises jobs, housing and a better way of life. But is it real? When We Left follows two members of Congress, two cousins in the inner city, a pair of Black advertising executives, and an interracial, lesbian Black Lives Matter couple as they tackle perhaps the most monumental issue they will ever face: is the American dream for Black people?

Talkbacks will follow each reading. A reception will follow the panel and the final reading on March 19.

All events are free and open to the public; reservations are required. Reservations can be made beginning Monday, February 22.

Visit www.larktheatre.org for more information.

THE NEW BLACK FEST PARTICIPANTS (2016)

Jocelyn Bioh has her B.A. in English and Theater from The Ohio State University and MFA in Theater-Playwriting from Columbia University School of the Arts. As a playwright, Jocelyn has been produced in New York City, Columbus, OH, Baton Rouge, LA and Washington D.C. Plays include: African Americans (Produced at Howard University 2015; Southern Rep Ruby Prize Award Finalist 2011; O’Neill Center Semi-Finalist, 2012), Nollywood Dreams (Kilroy’s List 2015) and her new play School Girls. Her musical The Ladykiller’s Love Story, for which she conceived the story and wrote the book with music/lyrics by Cee Lo Green, is currently in development with Hi-Arts NYC. As an actress, Jocelyn’s credits include: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Broadway; Tony Award Winner for Best Play, 2015), An Octoroon (Soho Rep, Obie Award Winner for Best Play, 2014), Booty Candy (Wilma Theater), Seed (Classical Theater of Harlem, Audelco Award Nominee), and Marcus; or The Secret of Sweet (City Theatre). She also originated the role of “Topsy” in the World Premiere of Neighbors (The Public Theater, Audelco Award Nominee). TV: The Characters (Netflix) Louie (FX) One Life to Live (ABC). Former Cover Girl spokesmodel (National commercial/Print ads).

Eric Micha Holmes is a playwright whose work has been seen and developed at Rattlestick Playwrights Theatre (World Without Names), New York Theatre Workshop (Nimpsey Pink) and The Lark (Red All Over) among others. Former residencies and fellowships include Space on Ryder Farm (The Stick Up) and LaGuardia Performing Arts Playwriting Lab (Falls For Jodie). His mono-play, Walking Next To Michael Brown: Confessions Of A Light-Skinned Half-Breed, was commissioned by The New Black Fest and has toured with “Hands Up: 6 Playwrights / 6 Testaments” to theaters across the country including: The National Black Theatre (Harlem, NY), Museum Of The Moving Image (NYC), The Hansberry Project (Seattle, WA) and Flashpoint Theatre (Philadelphia, PA). His monologue, “W.F.C.,” is published by The Good Ear Review. Holmes co-founded Team Play, a theater-for-young-adults education program at Primary Stages Theatre Company. Holmes is currently a third-year MFA Playwriting student at University of Iowa’s Playwrights Workshop.

Lenelle Moïse is a poet, playwright, and performance artist. She won the 2012 Southern Rep Ruby Prize for Merit, a black feminist comedy. She was a 2012-2014 Huntington Theatre Company Playwriting Fellow and the 2010-2011 Poet Laureate of Northampton, Massachusetts. She wrote, composed and co-starred in the critically acclaimed drama Expatriate. Her plays have been developed with the Culture Project, the Hansberry Project, Hedgebrook, the Jewish Plays Project, the Kitchen Theatre Company, Serious Play Theatre Ensemble, and New Rep, among others. She has also been an artist-in-residence at Clark University, Northwestern and UT Austin. Moïse is the author of Haiti Glass, a winner of the 2015 PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award. She is currently working on Where There Are Voices, a solo performance, fusing music, movement, video and poetry. http://www.lenellemoise.com

Lisa Rosetta Strum‘s She Gon’ Learn  performed to sold out audiences during the United Solo Festival at Theatre Row last fall and garnered one of the festival’s Best Solo Show Awards in New York City. The play had its inaugural showing with the Emerging Artist Theatre Festival at TADA! Theatre and was performed at The Kraine Theatre for the Obie Award Winning Fire This Time Festival and just recently at the National Black Theatre. Lisa has also performed at Lincoln Center Theatre, Summer Stage, Signature Theatre, New Federal Theatre, Intiman Theatre, The Obie Award Winning 48 Hours in…Harlem, ACT Seattle, and The Fifth Avenue Theatre. She has had a recurring role on Law & Order: SVU and co-stared in the television pilot Citizen Baines with James Cromwell. As an educational consultant, she has worked in numerous public schools throughout New York, conducted theater workshops for Teachers College at Columbia University, and has acted as the Theatre Specialist for the Abrons Arts Center, Barbara L. Tate Arts Camp for the past nine seasons. Lisa is an MFA graduate of the University of Washington Professional Actor Training Program.

NSangou Njikam is an actor and playwright originally from Baltimore, MD.  He is the author of Syncing Ink, Re:Definition, I.D., When We Left, Search For The Crystal Stairs, and one of the authors of “Hands Up: 6 Plays, 6 Testimonials.”  His work has been developed by The Public Theater, Penn State University, The Flea Theater, Hip Hop Theatre Festival, UNIVERSES theatre company, The New Black Fest, and the Alley Theater.  Mr. Njikam’s play I.D. recently made its world premiere at the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown, South Africa before coming to the U.S. at Penn State Centre Stage.  His playwriting residencies and fellowships include 2015 Emerging Writers Group at the Public Theater, 2013 New Black Fest fellow, and Penn State University commissioned playwright.  Currently, Mr. Njikam’s play, Syncing Ink, will go to the Alley Theater’s All New Festival, directed by Niegel Smith.   As an arts educator, Mr. Njikam has worked for Brooklyn Academy of Music, CUNY Creative Arts Team, Harlem School of the Arts, and is co-founder of The Continuum Project, Inc., an organization using African Ancestry DNA testing and the Arts to promote healing and empowerment for communities.  Mr. Njikam’s work focuses mainly on identity stories and the empowerment of the human spirit by recognizing and embracing one’s personal gifts, utilizing Hip Hop theater, poetry, and West African performance aesthetics.  He also aims to develop new, diverse and younger audiences by creating “theater of the now and for tomorrow.” He received his BFA in acting from Howard University.  After tracing his roots to the Tikar people in Cameroon, West Africa, he was named NSangou by Sultan Ibrahim MBombo Njoya, 19th king of the Bamoun kingdom in Cameroon.  He currently resides in New York.

The Lark is an international theater laboratory, based in New York City, dedicated to empowering playwrights by providing transformative support within a global community. Founded in 1994, The Lark provides writers with funding, space, collaborators, audiences, professional connections, and the freedom to design their own processes of exploration. The guiding principle of The Lark’s work is the belief that playwrights are society’s truth tellers, and their work strengthens our collective capacity to understand our world and imagine its future.

Last year, The Lark served 907 artists, including 138 playwrights, partnered with over three dozen theaters and universtieis, and welcomed 3,000 audience members to 40 public presentations.  in the past three years 169 Lark developed plays moved on to 289 productions in more than a dozen countries around the world.In order to provide economic flexibility to writers at different stages of their careers, The Lark has created a portfolio of major playwriting fellowships.  The Lark continues to offer a free and open submission process that allows any and all writers to submit to our Playwrights’ Week program and maintains free admission to the public for all readings & workshops.

Plays substantially developed at The Lark include The Mountaintop by Katori Hall, Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo by Rajiv Joseph, brownsville song (b-side for tray) by Kimber Lee, and Detroit ’67 by Dominique Morisseau.

www.larktheatre.org

The New Black Fest is a theater organization committed to celebrating insurgent voices within the diverse African Diaspora through theater, film and discussion. The New Black Fest is a gathering of artists, thinkers, activists and audiences who are dedicated to stretching, interrogating and uplifting the Black aesthetic in the 21st century. The New Black Fest has developed many artists including Mfoniso Udofia, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Dennis Allen II, Eisa Davis and more. It has partnered with the National Black Theatre, 651 ARTS, the BRIC Arts/Media/Brooklyn, the Classical Theatre of Harlem and more. It also co-founded the American Slavery Project as well as commissioned Facing Our Truth: 10-Minute Plays on Trayvon, Race and Privilege, HANDS UP: 7 Playwrights, 7 Testaments, and the recent Un-Tamed: Hair Body Attitude – Short Plays by Black Women (in collaboration with Dominique Morisseau).

Keith Josef Adkins (Artistic Director) As a playwright, his plays include The People Before the Park (Premiere Stages), Pitbulls (Rattlestick),Safe House (Cincinnati Playhouse, Repertory Theatre of St. Louis)
among others. His play The Last Saint on Sugar Hill received its New York City premiere in 2013 at Dr. Barbara Ann Teer’s National Black Theater in NYC under the direction of Seret Scott and earned six 2014 Audelco nominations. Other plays include The Migrant’s Fight, Sugar and Needles, The Final Daze, among others.  He is currently under commission by Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park.

February 18, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Social Justice/Symposia – Upcoming Events From the Center for Justice at Columbia University

 

Upcoming Events  From

the Center for Justice at

Columbia University

CHAPTER AND VERSE
Thursday February 18, 2016
from 6:30pm-8:30pm
FILM | CARLA KUHN MEMORIAL SPEAKER SERIES

Chapter and Verse

Thurs, Feb 18, 2015, 6:30 pm

Jamal Joseph, School of the Arts
Kathy Boudin, Center for Justice
Soffiyah Elijah, Correctional Association of New York
Carl Hart, Department of Psychology
Samuel Roberts, Institute for Research in African-American Studies
Introduced by Maureen Ryan, Film Program
Moderated by Kendall Thomas, School of Law
Miller Theatre
2960 Broadway

Interdisciplinary conversation on race, justice, and the carceral continuum following a screening of Jamal Joseph‘s Chapter and Verse.

About the film: “Upon his return from serving eight years in prison, reformed gang leader S. Lance Ingram struggles to adapt to a changed Harlem. Lance lives under the tough supervision of a parole officer in a half-way house. Unable to find a job with the computer tech training he received in prison, Lance is forced to take a deliveryman job in a food pantry. It is thus that he meets and is befriended by Ms. Maddy, a 60-year old strong and spirited grandmother. Lance assume responsibility for Ty’s well being, Ms. Maddy’s 15-year old grandson—a promising student and artist who has become involved in a dangerous Harlem street gang. Lance tries to make peace with G-Rod, the charismatic gang leader and makes a deal to let Ty walk away. But when gang members decide to punish Ty for disobeying the ‘law of the streets, Lance decides to sacrifice his ‘second chance’ at freedom so that Ty can have a ‘first chance’ at a better life.”

Panel discussion will include School of the Arts Professor Jamal Joseph, Kathy Boudin from Center for Justice, Soffiyah Elijah from Correctional Association of New York, Department of Psychology Professor Carl Hart and Institute for Research in African-American Studies Professor Samuel Roberts. The panel will be introduced by School of the Arts Film Program Professor Maureen Ryan and moderated by Kendall Thomas from the School of Law.

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THROUGH DIFFERENT EYES:
A Community Impacted
Friday, February 19, 2016
THROUGH DIFFERENT
EYES: A Community ImpactedFriday February 19, 2016
5pm-9pm
583 Riverside Drive 7th FL
New York, NY 10031
Corner of 135th StreetOPEN TO THE PUBLICTHROUGH DIFFERENT EYES
is a first hand account of two
African American men going through Rikers Island.
One as a NYC Correctional Officer, the other as a teenager looking for a way out of poverty.
Two sets of eyes traveling the same road!

The Negro American has survived at all is extraordinary—a lesser people might simply have died out, as indeed others have … But it may not be supposed that the Negro American community has not paid a fearful price for the incredible mistreatment to which it has been subjected over the past three centuries.
-The Negro Family: The Case for National Action.

Sponsored by the Center for Justice at Columbia University, BROADWAY HOUSING COMMUNITES and Opportunities and Change

REAL WOMEN REAL VOICES
Friday, February 26, 2016
Friday, February 26, 2016 4-7pm
Jerome L. Greene Hall – JG 103 435 W 116th Street
New York, NY 10027
COLUMBIA LAW SCHOOLFor more information visit:
http://www.thelohm.org
The Real Women Real Voices symposium is a groundbreaking discussion that will highlight the issues and concerns that impact incarcerated women. The two-part panel will feature currently incarcerated women and formerly incarcerated women discussing the impact of incarceration on not only their lives, but also their children and families, and the necessity for the advancement of policy around women in incarceration.The Ladies of Hope Ministries presents the Real Women Real Voices symposium, A precursor to the 2016 Beyond the Bars Conference, sponsored by the Center for Justice at Columbia University and the Beyond the Bars Fellows.

Organized by the Ladies of Hope Ministries and sponsored by the Center for Justice at Columbia University, the Beyond the Bars Fellowship, The Heyman Center for Humanities, Center for the Study of Law and Culture, AMPLIFI, Families for Justice as Healing and Women Who Never Give Up

Beyond the Bars 2016Connecting the Struggles
March Friday 4th-
Sunday 6th, 2016
The 6th Annual Justice Conference at Columbia University

BEYOND THE BARS
Connecting the Struggles

March 4-6, 2016

For More information about the conference click the link below:
http://centerforjustice.columbia.edu/education/beyond-the-bars-conference-2016/

The 6th annual Beyond the Bars Conference will take place March 4-6, 2016 at Columbia University. This year’s conference, Connecting the Struggles, aims to connect the many ways in which mass incarceration has impacted individuals, families and communities across the U.S, and beyond, as well as build connections across diverse struggles for social justice.

Albert Einstein stated that imagination is more powerful than knowledge ––Our comrade and sister Angela Davis, challenged us to imagine a world without prison. Join us as we honor the spirit of the struggle – join in solidarity with impacted people, and with academics, activists, practitioners and community members as we continue to connect the struggles in the efforts to eradicate mass incarceration and to build a world where social justice is ubiquitous.

Conference Schedule

Friday March 4th: Conference Kick Off Event with Angela Davis

Saturday March 5th: Panels and Breakout Sessions 

Sunday March 6th: Building the Grassroots – Organizing Workshops 

Conference Registration will begin in February 2016
As always the conference is free and open to the public

For More information about the conference click the link below:
http://centerforjustice.columbia.edu/education/beyond-the-bars-conference-2016/

Call for Workshop Proposals for Sunday March 6th

Have an idea for a workshop? We’re accepting workshop applications now for the Sunday portion of the conference [click here for more information]. Please apply by Friday January 29th.

Beyond the Bars is organized by the Criminal Justice Caucus at the Columbia School of Social Work, the Center for Justice at Columbia University, and the Beyond The Bars Fellows

THE CONFINED ARTS:
Solitary Confinement Edition
March 12, 2016 
his edition of The Confined Arts will be a symposium consisting of an art exhibition, poetry, a panel discussion, a promotional screening, and more. Opportunities and Change will be collaborating with the Campaign for Alternatives to Isolated Confinement to highlight the humanity of the people held in solitary confinement inside of our nation’s prisons. Additionally, we hope to raise awareness about the inhumane conditions and the use of solitary confinement to educate attendees.

Date: Saturday  March 12, 2016

Time: 12:00 PM – 5:00 PM

St. Francis College

180 Remsen St,

Brooklyn, NY 11201

http://www.opportunitiesandchange.org

The Confined Arts is a platform to illustrate and showcase the talents of currently and formerly incarcerated creative voices. We are creative voices that speak through our visual art, performing art, poetry, and music. We speak as creative voices in order to abolish the inhumane narratives and socially degrading stigmas that are used to describe our past experiences and limit our futures. We’ve set out to establish new empathic narratives about who we are. The Confined Arts platform is also open to those artists who work in or around jails and prisons, or are in other ways linked to the issue of mass incarceration. The Confined Arts is also home to artists who have been affected by mass incarceration due to the imprisonment of a friend or family member.

Organizers:

Johnny Perez, Media Committee Co- Chairman, Campaign for Alternatives to Isolated Confinement. 2015 Opportunity Agenda Fellow, SFC Student

Isaac Scott, Columbia University, Center for Justice/Opportunities and Change

Emily Horowitz, Associate Professor & Chairperson, Department of Sociology & Criminal Justice, Director, Institute for Peace & Justice

Sponsors:

Hudson Link @ St.Francis

Campaign for Alternative to Isolated Confinement

Justice and Education Initiative, Columbia University·

Opportunities and Change

New York University

 

+ GOOGLE CALENDAR

February 18, 2016 Posted by | BUSINESS, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Visiting Artist Talk –Beatriz Santiago Muñoz – Wednesday, February 17, 2016 7pm *New School/Parsons

Visiting Artist Lecture: Beatriz Santiago Muñoz

Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Starr Foundation Hall, University Center 63 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003

The Culture and Media Department at Eugene Lang College, in collaboration with Parsons and The School of Media Studies welcomes Beatriz Santiago Muñoz for a screening and Q&A.

About Beatriz Santiago Muñoz: Beatriz Santiago Muñoz is an artist based in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Her work draws from experiments in film, ethnography, and theater, and develops out of periods of observation and documentation in which the camera is present as an object with social implications and as an instrument mediating aesthetic thought. Subjects include an artist accused of terrorism, anarchist communities, mega­factories, and the life of a concrete poet/union leader. Her work has been exhibited recently at the Mercosul Biennial, Brazil; San Juan Triennial Poligráfica; Glasgow International; and Tate Modern in London.

Sponsored by Eugene Lang College, Parsons School of Design and The School of Media Studies with thanks to Flaherty NYC.

Subscribe
Event Type
Film and Media Screenings

Audience
General Public

School
Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts, Schools of Public Engagement, School of Media Studies, Parsons School of Design, School of Art, Media and Technology

Theme
Media and Technology

Topic
Video, Audio, and Web-based media, Global Studies and Migration, Politics

February 17, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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