LuckyGirl MEDIA recommends

Choices and Trends for Women "from Teens to Grandmothers"

VIVE LA FRANCE! 3/6-15/15 French Cinema

RDV 2015 poster - 27x40

 

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Films NOT TO BE MISSED :

My Friend Victoria / Mon amie Victoria,

SK1 / L’Affaire SK1,

May Allah Bless France! / Qu’Allah bénisse la France!,

Eat Your Bones / Mange tes morts,

Love at First Fight / Les Combattants,

3 Hearts / 3 Coeurs,

 

ALL FILMS:

Films, Descriptions & Public Screening Schedule

Main Venues: BAMcinématek (BAM)/IFC Center (IFC)/Walter Reade Theater (WRT)

Opening Night: Alice Tully Hall (ATH)

 

 

Opening Night

3 Hearts / 3 Coeurs

Benoît Jacquot, France/Germany/Belgium, 2014, DCP, 106m

French with English subtitles

While traveling through a small provincial town, reserved and melancholic Parisian Marc (Benoît Poelvoorde, Man Bites Dog) meets by chance Sylvie (Charlotte Gainsbourg), a mysterious and beautiful stranger. The two spend a magical night together and fall madly in love. Without exchanging names or information, they agree to meet by a fountain in Paris, à la An Affair to Remember—but as in that classic tearjerker, fate conspires against them. Thinking herself jilted, Sylvie returns to her past life, whereupon Marc meets and woos Sophie (Chiara Mastroianni)—blissfully unaware that she’s Sylvie’s sister. Benoît Jacquot, whose Farewell, My Queen was a highlight of Rendez-Vous 2012, directs this romantic and tragic roundelay, co-starring the luminous Catherine Deneuve (Mastroianni’s mother on-screen and off-). A Cohen Media Group release. U.S. Premiere

Friday, March 6, 7:30pm – ATH (Intro by Benoît Jacquot, Charlotte Gainsbourg & Chiara Mastroianni)

Saturday, March 7, 5:00pm – IFC (Q&A with Chiara Mastroianni)

 

Closing Night

Reality / Réalité

Quentin Dupieux, France/Belgium, 2014, DCP, 102m

French and English with English subtitles

Quentin Dupieux, the architect of Rubber (which, in case you missed it, was about a sentient, murderous tire), lets his imagination take flight again, resulting in a multi-threaded Lynchian house of mirrors. The only “reality” on view here is a little girl by that name (Kyla Kenedy) who finds a VHS tape inside the carcass of a boar her father is planning to stuff. Meanwhile, the cameraman (Alain Chabat) of a show hosted by a man in a bear suit (Jon Heder, Napoleon Dynamite himself) needs to record the perfect scream for his pet project, a film about killer TVs. You won’t want to miss this unique and hilarious reverie—much more than the sum of its quirks—featuring Philip Glass’s Music with Changing Parts, a perfect sonic analog to Dupieux’s ineffable vision. An IFC Midnight release.

Sunday, March 15, 6:45pm – WRT (Q&A with actor Alain Chabat) & 9:15pm – WRT (intro by actor Alain Chabat)

 

40-Love / Terre battue

Stéphane Demoustier, France/Belgium, 2014, DCP, 95m

French with English subtitles

When Jérôme (Olivier Gourmet), a fiftyish department-store sales manager, loses his job, and his wife Laura (Valeria Bruni Tedeschi) leaves him for another man, all he has left are his pipe dreams and his son Ugo (first-time actor Charles Mérienne). Though only 11 years old, Ugo already shows great promise as a tennis pro, with a trainer eager to recruit him. Jerome cares for Ugo’s auspicious career only grudgingly until a startling development forces him to rethink his priorities. Playing another of his harried “ordinary men,” Gourmet brings trademark authenticity to a role that (like the film’s tennis-entendre English title) skirts both silliness and melancholy. Thanks to his efforts and the preternaturally confident young Mérienne, this first feature by Stéphane Demoustier clears the net on every serve.

Thursday, March 12, 6:00pm – IFC (Q&A with Stéphane Demoustier)

Friday, March 13, 6:45pm – WRT (Q&A with Stéphane Demoustier)

 

Breathe / Respire

Mélanie Laurent, 2014, France, DCP, 91m

French with English subtitles

Internationally acclaimed actress Mélanie Laurent (Inglourious Basterds) follows up her 2011 feature directorial debut, The Adopted, with a perceptive account of high-school angst and obsession. Shy 17-year-old Charlie (Joséphine Japy) becomes fast friends with Sarah (Lou de Laâge), a new arrival in their school. The outgoing Sarah coaxes Charlie out of her shell and becomes a fixture in her home, but when the two go on holiday together their relationship turns sour. Laurent trusts her gifted young stars with challenging long takes and they reward her faith in abundance. Featuring César winner Isabelle Carré (Beautiful Memories) as Charlie’s dysfunctional mother, Breathe echoes Blue Is the Warmest Color in broad strokes but paints its own striking portrait of youthful ardor and codependency. Nominated for two César Awards.

Saturday, March 7, 3:00pm – WRT (Q&A with Mélanie Laurent)

Saturday, March 7, 6:00pm – BAM (Q&A with Mélanie Laurent)

Sunday, March 8, 6:45pm – IFC (Q&A with Mélanie Laurent)

Monday, March 9, 4:15pm – WRT

 

The Connection / La French

Cédric Jimenez, France, 2014, DCP, 135m

French with English subtitles

Academy Award winner Jean Dujardin (The Artist) plays radically against type in this gripping thriller from the files of the same criminal ring that inspired William Friedkin’s classic The French Connection. Dujardin is Pierre Michel, a Marseilles magistrate who dedicates himself to apprehending fearsome heroin czar Gaetano Zampa (Gilles Lellouche, Little White Lies). As in the policiers by Jean-Pierre Melville that it evokes, the principled antagonists of The Connection are two sides of a coin, more like one another than the rats in their respective organizations. Director Cédric Jimenez uses late-70s music and fashion to resurrect the disco-age backdrop against which their vendetta played out. Though highlighted by Dujardin’s Delon-esque turn, the all-star French cast includes Benoît Magimel (Isabelle Huppert’s pupil/pursuer in The Piano Teacher), and the luminous Céline Sallette (House of Pleasures) as Pierre Michel’s wife. Nominated for two César Awards. A Drafthouse Films release. U.S. Premiere

Saturday, March 7, 6:00pm – WRT (Q&A with Cédric Jimenez & Céline Sallette)

Saturday, March 7, 9:00pm – BAM (Q&A with Cédric Jimenez & Céline Sallette)

Sunday, March 8, 3:45pm – IFC (Q&A with Cédric Jimenez & Céline Sallette)

 

Eat Your Bones / Mange tes morts

Jean-Charles Hue, France, 2014, DCP, 94m

French with English subtitles

After his documentary/fiction hybrid debut The Lord’s Ride, which portrayed the gypsy communities of northern France, director Jean-Charles Hue reunited several of that film’s nonprofessional stars to tell the story of another Romani family. Eighteen-year-old Jason (Jason François), on the verge of baptism, finds his values tested when half-brother Fred (Frédéric Dorkel) returns from a 15-year prison stint anything but rehabilitated. The two, along with a third brother and a cousin, team up to steal a truckload of copper, but they prove to be inept criminals and unstable partners. For this dynamic and absorbing glimpse at an underrepresented culture, Hue received the 2014 Prix Jean Vigo, awarded annually to one director by the Cinema of France “for their spirit of independence and extraordinary style.” U.S. Premiere

Sunday, March 8, 9:00pm – IFC (Intro by producer Thierry Lounas)

Monday, March 9, 6:45pm – WRT (Intro by producer Thierry Lounas)

 

Fidelio, Alice’s Odyssey / Fidelio, l’odyssée d’Alice

Lucie Borleteau, France, 2014, DCP, 97m

French, Romanian, Tagalog, Norwegian, and English with English subtitles

Actress Lucie Borleteau makes her feature directing debut with this insightful study of a woman situated in an almost exclusively male milieu. Sailor Alice (Ariane Labed) joins the freighter Fidelio as a replacement engineer, soon discovering that the captain, Gaël (Melvil Poupaud), is a man with whom she was once romantically involved. Though she leaves behind a fiancé on land (Anders Danielsen Lie, Oslo, August 31st), she finds her feelings for Gaël have not abated. Buttressed by a remarkable international cast, Fidelio, Alice’s Odyssey presents a rounded portrait of a passionate woman faced with difficult choices. Greek actress Labed won Best Actress at Locarno for her memorable performance. Nominated for two César Awards including Best Debut Feature.

Saturday, March 14, 9:00pm – WRT (Q&A with Lucie Borleteau & Ariane Lebed)

 

Gaby Baby Doll

Sophie Letourneur, France, 2014, DCP, 88m

French with English subtitles

As the awkward, insecure bubbly Gaby, Lolita Chammah (Farewell, My Queen) suggests a Gallic Greta Gerwig in one of her not-quite-formed-adult roles. Upon arriving in the country, she’s promptly discarded by her boyfriend, and as solitude is not an option, the companionship-starved Gaby seeks out a replacement. She finds it in Nicolas (Benjamin Biolay), a seemingly hirsute vagabond whose shack she invites herself to share. Director Sophie Letourneur’s follow-up to 2012’s Les coquillettes is a tentative pastoral romance filled with endearing neuroses and an organically unpredictable plot, charming and moving in its investigation of why it is that some simply cannot bear to be alone. North American Premiere

Monday, March 9, 9:00pm – IFC

Thursday, March 12, 9:30pm – WRT

 

Hippocrates / Hippocrate

Thomas Lilti, France, 2014, DCP, 102m

French with English subtitles

Following up his debut feature, 2007’s Les yeux bandés, Thomas Lilti takes us inside a Paris hospital—an environment he knows well, being a practicing doctor himself. Novice doctor Benjamin (Vincent Lacoste), interning in his father’s ward, makes a rookie mistake that costs a patient his life. The administration quickly covers up his wrongdoing, but the dead man’s wife begins asking questions and Benjamin’s overworked colleagues resent his nepotism. Reda Kateb (A Prophet, Zero Dark Thirty) provides the film’s moral center as Abdel, a skilled physician forced to work as an intern due to his immigrant status, struggling mightily and alone to place patient welfare ahead of staff impunity. Recalling both Arthur Hiller’s The Hospital in its cynical view of the profession and Maïwenn’s Polisse in its tough depiction of state institutions, Lilti’s biting dramedy posits that “Hippocratic” and “hypocrite” share more than linguistic affinities. Nominated for seven César Awards including Best Film. A Distrib Films release. North American Premiere

Friday, March 6, 7:15pm – IFC

Friday, March 13, 9:30pm – WRT (Q&A with composers Low Entertainment)

 

In the Courtyard / Dans la cour

Pierre Salvadori, France, 2014, DCP, 97m

French with English subtitles

National treasure Catherine Deneuve sinks her teeth into the role of Mathilde, a former social worker inhabiting an upscale apartment with her husband Serge (Féodor Atkine). When slovenly musician Antoine (Gustave Kervern) applies by chance for a caretaker job in their building, Mathilde insists Serge hire him, despite his rough manners and lack of qualifications. An unlikely friendship develops between the depressed custodian and the elegant retiree, whose dependence on Antoine increases as her grasp on reality begins to slip. Best known for light comedies like Après Vous, director Pierre Salvadori handles the shifts in tone adroitly, abetted by nuanced turns from Kervern (himself a director) and the always masterful Deneuve in a César Award-nominated performance. A Cohen Media Group release.

Saturday, March 7, 1:00pm – WRT

Monday, March 9, 7:00pm – IFC

Tuesday, March 10, 4:15pm – WRT

 

In the Name of My Daughter / L’Homme qu’on aimait trop

André Téchiné, France, 2014, DCP, 116m

French with English subtitles

André Téchiné, whose previous film Unforgivable was a Rendez-Vous 2012 selection, returns with another penetrating psychological drama. In 1976 Nice, young divorcee Agnès Le Roux (Adèle Haenel) falls for shady lawyer Maurice Agnelet (Tell No One director Guillaume Canet), allowing him to manipulate her into handing the casino run by her mother, Renée (Catherine Deneuve), over to the mob. The subsequent disappearance of Agnès and Maurice’s emigration to Panama with her money convinces Renée that he has murdered her, and so she swears to see justice served. Téchiné’s atmospheric recounting of the real-life Affaire Le Roux features a regal turn from Deneuve and further evidence of Haenel’s immense versatility and remarkable talent. A Cohen Media Group release. North American Premiere

Tuesday, March 10, 9:30pm – IFC (Intro by Guillaume Canet)

Wednesday, March 11, 1:45pm & 6:45pm – WRT (Q&A with Guillaume Canet at 6:45pm screening)

 

Love at First Fight / Les Combattants

Thomas Cailley, 2014, France, DCP, 98m

French with English subtitles

A triple winner at last year’s Cannes, where it played in the Directors’ Fortnight, Love at First Fight offers a warm and refreshing coming-of-age story. Easygoing and naïve Arnaud (Kévin Azaïs) plans to spend the summer helping his brother in the family carpentry business. But when he meets Madeleine (Adèle Haenel), a steely young woman determined on the harshest military service and preoccupied with visions of the apocalypse, he adoringly follows her to boot camp. Thomas Cailley’s first feature may feel unmistakably familiar, yet it offers two alluring and empathetic protagonists (portrayed by equally likable actors), well-wrought humor, and gorgeous cinematography by David Cailley (the director’s brother). Nominated for nine César Awards including Best Film. A Strand Releasing release.

Thursday, March 12, 6:45pm – WRT (Q&A with Thomas Cailley & composers Hit and Run)

Thursday, March 12, 10:20pm – IFC (Q&A with Thomas Cailley & composers Hit and Run)

Sunday, March 15, 2:00pm – WRT

 

May Allah Bless France! / Qu’Allah bénisse la France!

Abd Al Malik, France, 2014, DCP, 95m

French with English subtitles

Celebrated rapper and spoken word artist Abd Al Malik makes his directorial debut with May Allah Bless France!, a candid account of his early life and artistic awakening that earned him the FIPRESCI Discovery Prize at the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival. Born Régis Fayette-Mikano to Congolese immigrants, he grew up in Strasbourg’s housing projects, participating in petty crimes that cost the lives of his friends. He found release in writing and performance, converting to Sufism at age 24 and penning the memoir that informed this adaptation. Marc Zinga ably inhabits the role of young Régis, movingly limning his journey to redemption. Shot in black and white, the film visually and thematically recalls Mathieu Kassovitz’s seminal urban crime drama La Haine. Nominated for two César Awards including Best Debut Feature.

Saturday, March 7, 10:00pm – IFC (Q&A with Abd Al Malik)

Sunday, March 8, 4:00pm – WRT (Q&A with Abd Al Malik)

Sunday, March 8, 6:00pm – BAM

 

Métamorphoses

Christophe Honoré, France, 2014, DCP, 102m

French with English subtitles

Perhaps the most ambitious undertaking in this year’s Rendez-Vous, Métamorphoses brings to the screen reimagined tales from Ovid’s magnum opus. The narrative poem, which interweaves mythology with a history of Roman civilization, is transplanted to present-day France, where Jupiter (Sébastien Hirel) absconds with schoolgirl Europa (newcomer Amira Akili). Nestled within their courtship are interludes with Narcissus, Orpheus, and Bacchus, and humans repeatedly changed into animals. Stylist Christophe Honoré (director of the musical melodrama Love Songs, a Rendez-Vous 2008 selection) renders scenes of breathtaking natural beauty and, as befits the gods’ dalliances with mortals, near-constant eroticism. A cinematic experience like no other. North American Premiere

Sunday, March 8, 9:15pm – WRT (Q&A with Christophe Honoré & producer Philippe Martin)

Monday, March 9, 2:00pm – WRT

Monday, March 9, 8:00pm – BAM (Q&A with Christophe Honoré & producer Philippe Martin)

Tuesday, March 10, 7:00pm – IFC (Q&A with Christophe Honoré)

 

My Friend Victoria / Mon amie Victoria

Jean-Paul Civeyrac, France, 2014, DCP, 95m

French with English subtitles

Based on the story “Victoria and the Staveneys” by Nobel laureate (and oft-filmed author) Doris Lessing, My Friend Victoria relocates its black London heroine to contemporary Paris while retaining her essential, puppet-like passivity. As an 8-year-old orphan, Victoria (Keylia Achie Beguie) is taken into the home of a white bourgeois family for a single night, fueling her dreams of comfort and privilege for the rest of her life. As an adult (now beautifully played by Guslagie Malanda), she reconnects with the youngest son of her host family, bearing his child after a brief affair. All the while she drifts from job to job, independent yet lacking focus—except for that one night from her childhood and its revelations. Director Jean-Paul Civeyrac manages a treatise on race and class that’s subtle, moving, and refreshingly non-didactic, refusing to reduce the characters to symbols or dilute the richness of Lessing’s prose. North American Premiere

Saturday, March 7, 2:50pm – IFC

Sunday, March 8, 2:00pm – WRT

Thursday, March 12, 4:15pm – WRT

 

Next Time I’ll Aim for the Heart / La Prochaine fois je viserai le coeur

Cédric Anger, France, 2014, DCP, 111m

French with English subtitles

Cédric Anger, once a critic for Cahiers du Cinéma, wrote and directed this chilling chronicle of notorious serial killer Alain Lamare (here renamed Franck Neuhart and played by Guillaume Canet). In a truly mordant twist, while Lamare was terrorizing France in the winter of 1978-79, he was also an outstanding gendarme tasked with apprehending the killer. His victims were all helpless young women, whom he stalked and shot while trying to start a love affair with his pretty cleaning lady (Ana Girardot). Anger follows in the footsteps of Friedkin and Fincher in divesting all glamour from crime, instead showing the dead ends that vex the crime fighters and the dark souls that plague the criminals. The evocative period soundtrack includes Johnny Thunders and The Velvet Underground. Nominated for two César Awards.

Tuesday, March 10, 6:45pm –WRT (Q&A with Cédric Anger & Guillaume Canet)

Tuesday, March 10, 8:30pm – BAM (Q&A with Cédric Anger & Guillaume Canet)

Wednesday, March 11, 4:15pm – WRT

Wednesday, March 11, 9:00pm – IFC (Q&A with Cédric Anger & Guillaume Canet)

 

Party Girl

Marie Amachoukeli-Barsacq, Claire Burger & Samuel Theis, France, 2014, DCP, 96m

French with English subtitles

Angélique (Angélique Litzenburger) is a sixtyish eccentric hostess living in a small room above a bar in Lorraine. For decades she’s worked for drinks and tips but she clearly loves this flamboyant unconventional way of life. One night, smitten customer Michel (Joseph Bour) proposes marriage. This could be a way out of her unsustainable lifestyle—but is she suited to domesticity? Moreover, is she prepared to reunite with her four children, all from past relationships, including a 16-year-old daughter who grew up in foster care? Inspired by the sudden wedding of actress Litzenburger, mother to co-director Theis, the gritty slice-of-life Party Girl took home two awards at Cannes (including the Camera d’Or), where it was a standout in Un Certain Regard. Nominated for two César Awards including Best Debut Feature. A Distrib Films release. U.S. Premiere

Thursday, March 12, 8:10pm – IFC (Q&A with Claire Burger & composers Low Entertainment)

Friday, March 13, 2:00pm – WRT

Saturday, March 14, 6:00pm – WRT (Q&A with Claire Burger & composers Low Entertainment)

 

Portrait of the Artist / Le dos rouge

Antoine Barraud, France, 2014, DCP, 127m

French with English subtitles

Renowned director Bertrand Bonello (House of Pleasures and Saint Laurent, as well as the subject of a retrospective at the Film Society this May) stars as “Bertrand,” a filmmaker approaching his next project with a peculiar obsession—monstrosity. Convinced it should be the central theme of his film, he fixates on the notion of monstrous imagery, visiting museums and even hiring a mysterious art historian (played simultaneously by Jeanne Balibar and Géraldine Pailhas) to help him find the painting that best embodies the idea (considering works by Francis Bacon, Caravaggio, and others). But to his shock, the mania consuming his mind begins to manifest itself in his body as a monstrous red stain takes shape on his back. A disquieting yet fascinating (and funny!) mixture of body horror and character study, co-starring Barbet Schroeder as a physician and Joana Preiss as Bertrand’s wife Barbe. North American Premiere

Friday, March 6, 9:30pm – IFC

Thursday, March 12, 8:00pm – BAM

Sunday, March 15, 4:00pm – WRT

 

SK1 / L’Affaire SK1

Frédéric Tellier, France, 2014, DCP, 120m

French with English subtitles

The multi-year hunt, arrest, and trial of serial killer Guy Georges is the subject of director Frédéric Tellier’s suspenseful feature debut, based on Patricia Tourancheau’s harrowing work of nonfiction, Guy Georges: La Traque. Sentenced to life imprisonment in 2001 for the murder of seven women, Georges (Adama Niane) was described by psychiatrists as “a narcissistic psychopath” and nicknamed The Beast of the Bastille. With great sophistication, Tellier renders the police’s dogged (though often clumsy) pursuit of Georges in all of its shocking twists and menacing turns. Featuring frequent Dardennes collaborator Olivier Gourmet, Christa Théret (star of Rendez-Vous 2013’s Renoir), Raphaël Personnaz (star of Rendez-Vous 2014’s The French Minister), and four-time César winner Nathalie Baye. U.S. Premiere

Saturday, March 7, 9:15pm – WRT (Q&A with Frédéric Tellier & Nathalie Baye)

Sunday, March 8, 1:00pm – IFC (Q&A with Frédéric Tellier & Nathalie Baye)

 

Stubborn / Une histoire américaine

Armel Hostiou, France, 2015, DCP, 85m

French and English with English subtitles

Experimental filmmaker and video artist Armel Hostiou expands his 2013 short Kingston Avenue into his second feature film (after 2011’s Day), a story about the steps we’ll take and the lies we tell ourselves in the name of love. Artist Barbara (Kate Moran) tires of her (very) brief relationship with Vincent (Vincent Macaigne) and leaves him behind in Paris. But the resolute Vincent follows her to America, determined to win back her affections. Shot in New York in wintertime and featuring daytime soap veteran and star of HBO’s Looking Murray Bartlett as Barbara’s new love interest, Stubborn, like its hero, is unabashedly romantic, utterly captivating, and often uncomfortably hilarious. North American Premiere

Tuesday, March 10, 9:30pm – WRT (Q&A with Armel Hostiou, co-writer Lea Cohen & producers Gaëlle Ruffier and Jasmina Sijercic)

Wednesday, March 11, 7:00pm – IFC (Q&A with Armel Hostiou, co-writer Lea Cohen & producers Gaëlle Ruffier and Jasmina Sijercic)

Wednesday, March 11, 8:30pm – BAM (Q&A with Armel Hostiou, co-writer Lea Cohen & producers Gaëlle Ruffier and Jasmina Sijercic)

Thursday, March 12, 2:00pm – WRT

 

Wild Life / Vie sauvage

Cédric Kahn, Belgium/France, 2014, DCP, 102m

French with English subtitles

Carole and Philippe (Céline Sallette and Mathieu Kassovitz), tired of propriety and consumerism, opt to renounce civilization and live off the land. Calling themselves Nora and Paco, they lead a nomadic life in their caravan, gradually adding children to the mix. But when Nora tires of their itinerant lifestyle and gains custody of their sons, Philippe refuses to allow his progeny to be raised according to the societal codes he abhors. What follows is the riveting true story (based on the case of Xavier Fortin) of a father’s reckless but all-consuming love, directed by Cédric Kahn, whose underrated thriller Red Lights also portrayed a husband driven to extremes. Kassovitz gives the performance of his career while Sallette is extraordinary as the desperate mother fighting to reunite with her sons. The film received a special jury prize at the San Sebastian International Film Festival. North American Premiere

Saturday, March 7, 7:30pm – IFC (Q&A with Cédric Kahn, Céline Sallette & producer Kristina Larsen)

Sunday, March 8, 6:30pm – WRT (Q&A with Cédric Kahn)

Sunday, March 8, 9:00pm – BAM (Q&A with Cédric Kahn & Céline Sallette)

 

Young Tiger / Bébé tigre

Cyprien Vial, France, 2014, DCP, 87m

French with English subtitles

Young Tiger marks the inaugural feature of Cyprien Vial, having written and directed four short subjects (including Cannes prizewinner In Range). Here he relates the experiences of eager and touching Punjabi teenager Many (Harmandeep Palminder), in France to pursue his education, torn between his desire to establish a life in his new country and the pressure to send money back home. Skipping school and forced to take illegal and dangerous jobs that pay him under the table, he finds himself on a slippery slope into criminal activity, while deceiving his girlfriend, Elisabeth (Elisabeth Lando), and his foster family. Basing his film on first- and secondhand experiences, Vial tells a story both particular to the Indian diaspora and universal to the plight of immigrants being pulled in all directions.

Saturday, March 7, 1:00pm – IFC

Monday, March 9, 9:30pm – WRT

Tuesday, March 10, 2:00pm – WRT

 

Shorts Program

Brevity is the soul of wit, and our four acclaimed shorts, all directed by talented and up-and-coming female directors, have wit and soul in abundance. Whether testing grounds for tomorrow’s feature filmmakers or stylistic departures for today’s top directors, our richly textured shorts prove that depth is in no way tied to duration.

 

The Smallest Apartment in Paris / Le Plus petit appartement de Paris

Hélèna Villovitch, France, 2014, DCP, 15m

French with English subtitles

Carla and François are forced to share a 16 square meter studio in this whimsical sketch addressing the housing crisis that all urban dwellers are sure to identify with. North American Premiere

 

Back Alley / Le Contre-allée

Cécile Ducrocq, France, 2014, DCP, 29m

French with English subtitles

A streetwalker since the age of 15, Suzanne finds her livelihood threatened by the arrival of African prostitutes on her turf in this heartbreaking winner of the Small Golden Rail prize at Cannes.

 

The Space / Espace

Eléonor Gilbert, France, 2014, DCP, 14m

French with English subtitles

A young girl wants to play soccer at recess but schoolyard sexism prevents it. So, with pencil and paper, she charts her grievances, urging her peers to take back the playground. U.S. Premiere

 

Extrasystole

Alice Douard, France, 2013, DCP, 35m

French with English subtitles

When student Raphaëlle, subject to cardiac contractions, meets enigmatic teacher Adèle, it’s not just her condition that makes her heart skip a beat.

Wednesday, March 11, 9:30pm WRT

Friday, March 13, 4:15pm WRT

 

 

About Unifrance FILMS

Founded in 1949, UniFrance films is a government-sponsored association of French film industry professionals dedicated to the international promotion of French films. With offices in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Mumbai, and Beijing, UniFrance films provides financial and logistical support to theatrical distributors and major film festivals showcasing new and recent French cinema throughout the world and a French film festival online. For more information, visit http://en.unifrance.org/.

 

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
Founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international cinema, the Film Society of Lincoln Center works to recognize established and emerging filmmakers, support important new work, and to enhance the awareness, accessibility, and understanding of the moving image. The Film Society produces the renowned New York Film Festival, a curated selection of the year’s most significant new film work, and presents or collaborates on other annual New York City festivals including Dance on Camera, Film Comment Selects, Human Rights Watch Film Festival, New Directors/New Films, NewFest, New York African Film Festival, New York Asian Film Festival, New York Jewish Film Festival, Open Roads: New Italian Cinema and Rendez-Vous with French Cinema. In addition to publishing the award-winning Film Comment magazine, the Film Society recognizes an artist’s unique achievement in film with the prestigious Chaplin Award, whose 2015 recipient is Robert Redford. The Film Society’s state-of-the-art Walter Reade Theater and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, located at Lincoln Center, provide a home for year-round programs and the New York City film community.

 

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from Jaeger-LeCoultre, American Airlines, The New York Times, HBO, Stella Artois, The Kobal Collection, Variety, Trump International Hotel and Tower, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

For more information, visit www.filmlinc.com, follow @filmlinc on Twitter, and download the FREE Film Society app, now available for iOS (iPhone and iPad) and Android devices.

 

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March 4, 2015 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, FILM, GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

THE 12th NEW YORK KOREAN FILM FESTIVAL (NYKFF) @ BAM 11/20-23, 2014 *BKLYN

Highly recommended.

The New York Korean Film Festival returns to BAMcinématek with the well-curated crop of record-breaking comedy and action blockbusters and must-see fresh new works by the most celebrated auteurs and mavericks.

 

The New York Korean film festival is back in business! What Subway Cinema started in 2001 with When Korean Cinema Attacks! – New York Korean Film Festival, and what has known many incarnations and iterations since then, is back in the funky and freaky curatorial hands of the festival’s original creators, now joining forces with BAMCinematek and The Korea Society to bring you the freshest crop of the record-breaking blockbusters and the must-see recent works of the peninsula’s internationally celebrated auteurs and mavericks.pirates613x463The new New York Korean Film Festival wants to serve as your road map for the best in contemporary Korean cinema.
All films in Korean with English subtitles.THURSDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20-23, 2014

BAM Rose Cinema30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn
(718) 636-4100 x 1
BAM

 

NY Korean Film Festival 2014_11_20__BAM__billboard

Thursday, November 20 7:15 PM GYEONGJU  with Q&A with director Zhang Lu
Friday, November 21 7:00 PM THE ATTORNEY 9:30 PM A HARD DAY
Saturday, November 22 7:00 PM  THE ADMIRAL: ROARING CURRENTS 9:30 PM MAN ON HIGH HEELS
Sunday, November 23 5:00 PM THE PIRATES 8:00 PM FUTURELESS THINGS

GYEONGJU (경주) 2014

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20 @ 7:15 PM

US Premiere
Director Zhang Lu will be in attendance.

2014, 145 min. DCP
Directed by Zhang Lu
Cast: Park Hae-Il, Shin Min-A, Yoon Jin-Seo, Kim Tae-Hoon, Shin So-Yul, Baek Hyun-Jin, Ryoo Seung-Wan

An “existential ghost story” (Variety) and a poetic, sentimental journey in the vein of Hong Sang-soo’s best films, Zhang Lu’s new film follows the wanderings of Peking University professor Choi-Hyun (WAR OF ARROWS’ Park Hae-Il) as he returns to the city of Gyeongju to attend a friend’s funeral. Spurred by the memory of an obscene picture he saw seven years ago on the wall of a teahouse, he proceeds to go on a strangely aimless quest, fumbling between tantalizing possibilities of erotic satisfaction or perhaps something of a more spiritual nature.

THE ATTORNEY (변호인) 2013

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21 @ 7:00 PM

2013, 127 min, DCP
Director: Yang Woo-Seok
Cast: Song Kang-Ho, Kim Young-Ae, Oh Dal-Su, Kwak Do-Won, Siwan 2013, 127 min, Blu-ray

Based on the life of former South Korean president Roh Moo-hyun, THE ATTORNEY was this year’s most controversial box office hit, with over 10 million admissions. Set during the days of the military dictatorship, it follows the moral transformation of a pragmatic, mercenary and a tad shady attorney-at-law Song Woo-Seok (star Song Kang-Ho), who only got into the legal profession for the money. But everything changes one day, when he decides to take on the country’s National Security Law by accepting as his client the student activist Jin-Woo (Lim Si-wan), who has been unfairly arrested and tortured by the government.

A HARD DAY (끝까지 간다) 2014

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21 @ 9:30 PM

2014, 111 min, DCP
Directed by Kim Seong-hun
Cast: Lee Sun-Kyun, Cho Jin-Woong, Jeong Man-Sik, Shin Jung-Keun, Kim Dong-Young, Joo Suk-Tae

A selection of the Directors’ Fortnight at this year’s Cannes film festival, A HARD DAY is a slick police thriller that follows detective Ko Gun-Soo (Lee Sun-Kyun, both a Hong Sang-Soo regular and a blockbuster frequent flyer) on a lung-bursting race against karma and all sorts of odds and (deadly) ends, as he runs over a stranger on an otherwise deserted, dark highway. Hastily shoving the dead body in his trunk in a moment of wild panic, the detective has just bought himself a world of trouble. What follows is a super-charged mixture of bone-crushing action, chases, black humor, and social satire, proving once again that no one makes smart genre films the way Korea does.

THE ADMIRAL: ROARING CURRENTS
(명량 – 회오리 바다다) 2014

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22 @ 7:00 PM

2014, 128 min, DCP
Directed by Kim Han-Min
Cast: Choi Min-Sik, Ryoo Seung-Ryong, Cho Jin-Woong, Jin Goo, Lee Jung-Hyun

World Premiere of World Wide Version

The blockbuster to sink all blockbusters (17.6 million admissions and counting), THE ADMIRAL: ROARING CURRENTS is a massive sea epic that depicts the 1597 Battle of Myeongryang, when a formidable Japanese fleet threatened the very existence of the peaceful peninsula. In a desperate, defiant last stand, Korea’s most celebrated historical hero, Admiral Yi Sun-Shin, portrayed by Choi Min-sik (Besson’s LUCY, Park Chan Wook’s OLDBOY) tries to save his homeland from a dire fate, with only a dozen ships at his command and his fierce determination not to go down without a good fight.

MAN ON HIGH HEELS (하이힐) 2014manonhighheels613x463

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22 @ 9:30 PM

2014, 125 min, Digibeta
Directed by Jang Jin | 2014

With Cha Seung-won, Oh Jeong-se, Esom, Ko Kyeong-pyo, Ahn Kil-kang, Lee Eon-jeong

After a three-year hiatus, Jang Jin (WELCOME TO DONGMAKGOL), one of Korea’s most inventive writer-directors, is back to subvert the tough-guy detective genre and established notions of Korean masculinity. Detective Ji-wook (Cha Seung-won) is the most bad-ass cop in town, never missing an opportunity to beat the crap out of the bad guys. But deep inside, despite his uber masculine good looks, Ji-wook is tired of being a tough boy. Tortured by the unavowable desire to be a woman, he decides to get a sex change. Things get messy when a gang that Ji-wook had busted starts hurting people close to him: time to prove that, even in high heels, he can still kick some ass.

THE PIRATES (해적: 바다로 간 산적) 2014

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23 @ 5:30 PM

2014, 130 min, DCP
Directed by Lee Suk-Hoon
Cast: Kim Nam-Gil, Son Ye-Jin, Yu Hae-Jin, Lee Kyoung-Young, Kim Tae-Woo

Korea’s answer to PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN is a family-friendly, Hollywood-style swashbuckling period comedy, powered by an even-keeled ensemble cast, including Son Ye-Jin (WHITE NIGHT, MY WIFE GOT MARRIED) as a lady pirate and Kim Nam-Gil as the unshaven beau. Set in the 14th century during a crucial period in Korean history, the film follows four rival parties of pirates, bandits, and soldiers, as they collide on a search for a grey whale that swallowed a royal seal of great importance. Enter hard-ass sea wenches, a bad guy with an eyepatch, slapstick aplenty, and an impressive display of special effects. A perfect summer popcorn blockbuster that delivers the fun in spades. Arrrrr!

FUTURELESS THINGS (이것이 우리의 끝이다적) 2014

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23 @ 8:00 PM

North American Premiere
2014, 107 min, DCP
Dir. Kim Kyung-Mook
Cast: Kim Su-hyeon, Yoo Yeong, Jeong Hye-in, Gong Myeong, Shin Jae-ha

An affectionate and delightful comedy of manners, structured in 13 episodes, FUTURELESS THINGS chronicles 24 hours in the intertwined lives of young clerks working at the same convenience store, and brings into the spotlight the private joys and tears of usually invisible people. What’s revealed is that there’s nothing ordinary about ordinary existence as we’re thrusted into a fascinating world of part-timers, college dropouts, North Korean defectors, gays and lesbians and other social outcasts, eking out a living in the interstices of ultra consumerist South Korea.

 

Additional Programming

As an extension of the festival, DramaFever will host two additional films streaming online:

Lee Jae-kyoo’s 18th-century costume drama The Fatal Encounter;

and Lee Myung-se’s visually ravishing M, featuring the expressionist nightmares of a novelist suffering from writers’ block.

More information to be announced.

Co-presented by Subway CinemaThis program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in Partnership with the City Council.

November 17, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

THE NEW YORK AFRICAN FILM FESTIVAL RETURNS TO THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER MAY 7-13 FOR ITS 21st EDITION –Maysles Center 5/15-18 — BAM 5/23-26

The 21st New York African Film Festival (Statement)

“REVOLUTION AND LIBERATION IN THE DIGITAL AGE”

In Africa and its diaspora, revolution is not always synonymous with the overthrowing of a government or a head of state. It is also the relentless search for liberation of the body and the mind that has characterized the history of African people through the years. Arising as a chain of movements led mostly by the youth and women, revolution is a force against unfair systems, an impulse for the people to follow their own dreams, and a shared experience of empowerment.  In the Digital Age, the struggle for liberation has found a resilient ally in technology, which has exerted multiplier effects in and outside the continent.

This is the core of the 21st New York African Film Festival: the experience of revolution and liberation in and from Africa in the twenty-first century. All of the films featured will tackle the path to liberation or the feeling of freedom itself:  its impact, its agents, but first and foremost its visual splendor.

Under this heading, this month-long multi-venue event will present a unique selection of contemporary and classic African films, running the gamut from features, shorts, and documentaries to experimental films, along with supplementary educational programs. Filmmakers and actors will also attend the screenings and Q&A sessions.

 

AFRICAN FILM FESTIVAL, INC.
For more than two decades, African Film Festival, Inc. (AFF) has bridged the divide between post-colonial Africa and the American public through the powerful medium of film and video. AFF’s unique place in the international arts community is distinguished not only by leadership in festival management, but also by a comprehensive approach to the advocacy of African film and culture. AFF established the New York African Film Festival (NYAFF) in 1993 with Film Society of Lincoln Center. The New York African Film Festival is presented annually by the African Film Festival, Inc. and Film Society of Lincoln Center, in association with Brooklyn Academy of Music. AFF also produces a series of local, national and international programs throughout the year. More information about AFF is found on the Web at http://www.africanfilmny.org.

Aya_12_03_284

AYA OF YOP CITY

In celebration of the centenary of Nigeria’s unification, Opening Night will feature the Nollywood dark comedy Confusion Na Wa by Kenneth Gyang

Centerpiece film is the much-anticipated Half of a Yellow Sun, directed and adapted by Biyi Bandele and starring
Thandie Newton, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Anika Noni Rose

The sweeping epic Sarraounia is the Closing Night selection

 

English Flyer(Front)

 

The Film Society of Lincoln Center (FSLC) and African Film Festival, Inc. (AFF) will present the 21th New York African Film Festival (NYAFF) May 7-13. Organized under the banner theme “Revolution and Liberation in the Digital Age,” the initial leg of the festival includes eleven features and eight short films from various African nations and the Diaspora. The NYAFF continues throughout May at the Cinema at the Maysles Documentary Center and the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s BAMcinématek.

“There are long and proud cinematic traditions in countries all over the African continent, and at the same time there are new voices and new means of expression. We are happy that the festival this year will be able to share the work of these artists, who are exploring both myth and modernity,” said FSLC Associate Director of Programming Marian Masone.

Half of a Yellow Sun

HALF OF A YELLOW SUN

“While American cinema started from popular films and progressed to art house, film in Africa went in reverse, garnering international interest through the art house genre before moving to popular cinema. Consequently, most of the films about Africa during its ‘art house’ phase cornered African cinema into a genre in itself, one that was perhaps not easily accessible,” said AFF Executive Director and NYAFF Founder Mahen Bonetti. “Today, the golden era of technology not only allows the African public to see films made about their own realities but also exhorts each generation of filmmakers to raise the bar with the stories they tell about the continent and its diaspora, resulting in a veritable digital revolution.”

With a gracious nod to Nollywood, the world’s second-largest film industry, and to the 100th centenary of the unification of Nigeria, the festival Opening Night presentation will be Confusion Na Wa, the dark comedy by Kenneth Gyang. Winner of Best Picture at the 2013 African Movie Academy Awards, the film stars OC Ukeje and Gold Ikponmwosa as two grifters whose decision to blackmail a straying husband (played by Ramsey Nouah) sets in motion a chain of events leading to a shocking conclusion. The screening will be preceded by the Opening Reception at 6pm. Regular festival prices apply for the screening, and tickets can be purchased on FilmLinc.com. Tickets for the movie and Opening Reception are $50 and available online at http://www.africanfilmny.org.

NYAFF audiences will get a sneak peek before the May 16 theatrical release of the critically acclaimed film Half of a Yellow Sun, based on the internationally best-selling novel of the same name by National Book Critics Circle Award–winning Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Directed by Biyi Bandele, the Centerpiece selection stars Thandie Newton and Anika Noni Rose as glamorous twins navigating life, love and the turbulence of the Biafra (Nigerian Civil) war in 1960s Nigeria. The Monterey Media release also includes a powerful performance by recent Oscar-nominee Chiwetel Ejiofor. Directly following the New York premiere of the film on Friday, May 9, the Centerpiece Gala will be held at the DiMenna Center for Classical Music’s Mary Flagler Cary Hall (450 West 37th Street, between 9th and 10th Avenues). Regular festival prices apply for the movie, and tickets can be purchased on FilmLinc.com. Tickets for the screening and benefit are $200 and available online at http://www.africanfilmny.org.

Half of a Yellow Sun

HALF OF A YELLOW SUN

A crop of films take up this year’s theme of revolution and liberation. In the documentary Mugabe: Villain or Hero?, director Roy Agyemang gets unprecedented access to the Zimbabwean leader and his entourage and lays bare the fight between African leaders and the West for African minerals and land. Ibrahim El Batout’s narrative feature Winter of Discontent takes viewers inside the Tahrir Square protests that were so central to the Arab Spring. And Ntare Guma Mbaho Mwine’s timely experimental short Kuhani features a conflicted priest, just as Uganda’s Anti-Homosexual Act is grabbing headlines.

As a part of this, women’s rights and issues are again in the spotlight. In her documentary Bastards, director Deborah Perkin follows a single mother, beaten and raped at 14 and discarded as she fights in Moroccan court to legitimize her sham marriage, thus ensuring a future for the daughter born out of her nightmare. In Cameronian director Victor Viyouh’s drama Ninah’s Dowry, the title character flees an abusive marriage only to be pursued by her husband to retrieve either his property (her) or the dowry he paid. The short Beleh, by Eka Christa Assam, turns gender roles on their head as a bullying husband gets a taste of his own medicine. The wounded central characters in the narrative films Of Good Report by Jahmil X.T. Qubeka and Grigris by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun are allegorical to the societal shifts and legacy of post-independent Africa.

On the lighter side, the festival will also present comedies, including Confusion Na Wa and It’s Us (Ni Si Si), as well as the U.S. premiere of the short Soko Sonko (The Market King). The Tunisian short Wooden Hands, also a U.S. premiere, delights as a willful five year-old’s act of rebellion takes on a life of its own. Additionally, writer Marguerite Abouet and illustrator Clément Oubrerie have brought their popular cartoon to life as directors of the animated feature Aya of Yop City, which follows the adventures of a 19-year-old and her girlfriends in Ivory Coast.

The Closing Night film on Tuesday, May 13, will be Sarraounia, Med Hondo’s sweeping epic based on historical accounts of Queen Sarraounia. Feared for her bravery and expertise in the occult arts, the fierce warrior leads the Azans of Niger into battle against French colonialists and enslavement at the turn of the century. The historical drama took first prize at the Panafrican Film and Television Festival of Ouagadougou (FESPACO) in 1987. Regular festival pricing applies.

From May 8-13, the Frieda and Roy Furman Gallery will host the exhibition Digital Africa, featuring the works of Congolese and American photographers. “Congolese Dreams” is a series of works by acclaimed photographer Baudouin Mouanda and a collective of artists, a companion to Philippe Cordey’s film of the same name, which will be screened during the festival. It will be paired with Adama Delphine Fawundu’s stunning portraits capturing the residents of Tivoli Towers in Crown Heights, Brooklyn—home to more than 350 families, who are mostly of African descent—as well as portraits of young musician-activists from Nigeria and the U.S.

All screenings will take place in the Walter Reade Theater, 165 West 65th Street (between Broadway and Amsterdam) and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, 144 West 65th Street (between Broadway and Amsterdam). Tickets for the New York African Film Festival screenings go on sale April 17 at the Film Society’s box offices and online at http://www.FilmLinc.com. Pre-sale to Film Society members begins on April 15. Single screening tickets are $13; $9 for students and seniors (62+); and $8 for Film Society members. Discount packages start at $30; $24 for students and seniors (62+); and $21 for Film Society members. Discount prices apply with the purchase of tickets to three films or more. Visit FilmLinc.com for additional information, and to purchase tickets.

NYAFF then heads to the Cinema at the Maysles Documentary Center in Harlem May 15-18. As is the tradition, the NYAFF closes over Memorial Day Weekend May 23-26 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music BAMcinématek as part of the dance and music festival DanceAfrica. For details, visit African Film Festival online at http://www.africanfilmny.org.

The programs of AFF are made possible by the generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Lambent Foundation, New York State Council on the Arts, NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, Open Society Institute for West Africa, Bradley Family Foundation, International Organization of La Francophonie, Domenico Paulon Foundation, WNYC, New York Community Trust, NYC & Company, New York Times Community Affairs Department, French Cultural Services, Manhattan Portage Bags, City Bakery, Metrowine, Flavorpill, South African Consulate General, SN Brussels, Columbia University’s Institute of African Studies, Hudson Hotel, Divine Chocolate and Omnipak Import Enterprises, Inc.

Kuhani Poster

 

 

Films and Descriptions for New York African Film Festival

Opening Night Film
Confusion Na Wa

Kenneth Gyang, Nigeria, 2013, 105m
English and Pidgin with English subtitles
Set in a Nigerian city, Confusion Na Wa is a dark comedy about a group of strangers whose fates become intertwined over the course of 24 hours. At the heart of everything is a phone found by opportunists Charles and Chichi, who, having read through its contents, decide to blackmail the owner Emeka, an arrogant lawyer who is cheating on his wife. Little do they realize that their misdemeanors have set in motion a chain of events that will lead to their own downfall. Meanwhile Bello, a civil servant who naïvely thinks hard work is its own reward is pushed to the edge of reason by his wife and his boss. And businessman Babajide lets his piety get the better of him. Eventually mayhem will connect them all. With a script by Tom Rowlands-Rees, director Kenneth Gyang takes a nonlinear approach to storytelling in this Nollywood prizewinner (Confusion Na Wa was named Best Film at the 2013 African Movie Academy Awards). New York Premiere
May 7, 7:30pm (Q&A with Kenneth Gyang)
May 10, 9:15pm (Q&A with Kenneth Gyang) 

Centerpiece Film
Half of a Yellow Sun

Biyi Bandele, Nigeria/UK, 2013, 113m
With epic grandeur, Half of a Yellow Sun tell the story of a generation living through the tumult of Nigeria’s independence and the ensuing Nigerian-Biafran War through the thorny romantic journeys of two sisters. Olanna (Thandie Newton) is married to Odenigbo (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a revolutionary who fathers a child with another woman. Her twin sister Kainene (Anika Noni Rose) is in love with a British writer (Joseph Mawle) who has come to Nigeria to teach. Playwright Biyi Bandele makes his film directorial debut with this adaptation of Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Orange Prize–winning novel. Half of a Yellow Sun may take place 50 years ago, but Bandale has fashioned it as an emotionally gripping example of contemporary Nigerian cinema, and honors the ongoing strength of that country’s women in the process. New York Premiere
May 9, 7:00pm (Q&A with Biyi Bandele and some cast members)

Half of a Yellow Sun

HALF OF A YELLOW SUN

Closing Night Film
Sarraounia

Med Hondo, Burkina Faso/Mauritania/France, 1986, 120m
Dioula, French, and Fula with English subtitles
Based on historical accounts of Queen Sarraounia, who leads the Azans into battle against the French colonialists at the turn of the century, Hondo’s sweeping epic rivals any that American cinema has produced. A brilliant strategist and forceful leader, Sarraounia is a young warrior queen, whose mastery of the ancient “magic” skills of martial arts and pharmacology is first put to the test when she defends her people from attack by a neighboring tribe, which earns respect from the men she guides into battle and deep loyalty from her people. But her real trial comes when the French army marches south to widen its colonial grip on the African continent. Hondo contrasts the strong alliances that emerge among African communities with the self-seeking and purposelessness of the Europeans and provides much-needed African historical perspective. Sarraounia is not only an engrossing tale of a remarkable woman’s bravery but also a captivating study of revolution against enslavement and the struggle for peace and freedom.
May 13, 6:30pm (Q&A with Permanent Representative to the UN for Francophonie Affairs Filippe Savadogo conducted by art historian and film critic Beatriz Leal)

Aya of Yop City
Marguerite Abouet & Clément Oubrerie, Ivory Coast/France, 2013, 85m
French with English subtitles
Abouet and Oubrerie bring their popular comic-book series that tracks the adventures of a young woman in a working-class town to cinematic life in a beautifully drawn account of West Africa in the 1970s. Nineteen-year-old aspiring doctor Aya spends most of her time at home in the Abidjan suburb of Yopougon (nicknamed Yop City) studying and dealing with her family so she doesn’t have time to take part in the exploits of her gal pals Bintou and Adjoua, both of whom want it all—to marry up as well as start their own business. Things go awry, though, when one of them gets pregnant. Oubrerie’s vivid drawings capture the spirit of a community growing past colonialism along with the rest of the country, and a spectacular soundtrack of period funk, rock, disco, and Afrojazz sets it all in motion. A delight for the eyes and the ears.
May 8, 4:30pm
May 11, 9:00pm (Intro by actress Aïssa Maïga) 

Bastards
Deborah Perkin, Morocco/UK, 2013, 93m
Arabic with English subtitles
In Morocco, as in all Muslim countries, sex outside marriage is illegal. Single mothers are despised, but what is the fate of their children? They are outcasts, condemned to a life of discrimination. Bastards tells this story from a mother’s point of view. At 14, Rabha El Haimer was an illiterate child bride, beaten, raped, and then rejected. Ten years later, she is a single mother, fighting to legalize her forced marriage, to register her daughter, and to make the father accept his child so that she can secure a future for her “illegitimate” daughter. With unprecedented access to the Moroccan justice system, filmmaker Deborah Perkin follows Rabha’s fight from the Casablanca slums—confronting her mother and asking why she married her off so young—to the high courts where the child’s father makes absurd claims and Rabha suffers verbal abuse from her father-in-law. Perkin may be the first Westerner to film in Moroccan family courts, where she captures real-life drama, played out in the first Muslim country in the world to recognize that single mothers and illegitimate children have rights.

Bast4

BASTARDS

Screening with
Beleh
Eka Christa Assam, Cameroon, 2013, 30m
Pidgin with English subtitles
Pregnant Joffi has a bullying husband who takes her, and pretty much everything else, for granted. His attitude is challenged when he awakes one morning to find a very different world from the one he fell asleep to the night before. A quirky, poignant, and pertinent look at gender roles. New York Premiere
May 9, 4:00pm
May 12, 6:00pm (Q&A with Deborah Perkin) 

Grigris
Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, Chad/France, 2013, 101m
French and Arabic with English subtitles
Despite a bum leg, 25-year-old Grigris has hopes of becoming a professional dancer, using his killer moves on the dance floor of his local club to secure some extra cash. His dreams are tested when his stepfather falls critically ill and he’s forced to risk his future by smuggling oil to pay the hospital bills. When he falls for Mimi, a beautiful but damaged prostitute, they attempt to start a new life together. But as bad decisions begin to catch up with them, they are forced to run for their lives. Their pasts, however, are never far behind… Professional dancer Souleymane Deme is remarkable as a man who can’t get a break, and veteran director Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, whose visually striking films have won awards at the Cannes and Venice film festivals, creates an elegant character study. New York Premiere
May 8, 8:45pm (Q&A with Mahamat-Saleh Haroun)
May 12, 3:45pm

It’s Us (Ni Si Si)
Nick Reding, Kenya, 2013, 88m
Swahili with English subtitles
Picture a typical Kenyan community: a harmonious muddle of tribes, intermarriages, and extended families; people living and working together all their days who don’t care which tribe their neighbor belongs to. What starts out as comic ribbing and good-natured banter between friends takes a more serious turn when politically motivated rumors arise and a sudden mistrust takes hold. With mistrust comes a sense of threat, and with threats, fear escalates, and in a matter of days, the bonds and alliances—the foundation of the community—are severed, just as they were in Kenya in 2008. Can a once-peaceful community learn from the mistakes of the past and be given another chance? Written and directed by Nick Reding, It’s Us was produced by the NGO-sponsored Arts for Education (S.A.F.E.) prior to Kenya’s elections to promote identity, peace, and unity by showing people confronting turmoil and violence. Can film change hearts and minds? Nick Reding and S.A.F.E. are making sure that happens. U.S. Premiere
May 8, 6:30pm (Q&A with Nick Reding)
May 12, 1:45pm

MAIN STREET MAMAS DANCING

IT’S US (NI SI SI)

Mugabe: Villain or Hero?
Roy Agyemang, UK/Zimbabwe, 2012, 116m
To most in the West, the title question of Roy Agyemang’s provocative documentary hardly needs to be asked. Accused of inept leadership and human-rights abuses, Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe, who has ruled the country since its independence from Great Britain in 1980 and was sworn in for a new five-year term just last summer, is also known for being the first African leader to seize white-controlled farms and redistribute them to the local population. British-born of Ghanaian parents, Agyemang set out to gain a fresh perspective on Mugabe by exploring the reality behind the headlines. And what was supposed to be a three-month project became a three-year all-access journey with Mugabe and his inner circle that reveals a charismatic, complicated man ruling a country at the intersection of international economics and post-colonial fallout. This personal film also raises wider serious issues about the relationship between African leaders and the West in the fight for the continent’s minerals and land.
May 7, 2pm
May 11, 6:15pm

New African Shorts
TRT: 110m

Baudouin Mouanda: Congolese Dreams
Philippe Cordey, Congo, 2012, 25m
Lingala, French, and German with English subtitles
For his latest project, The Dream, photographer Baudouin Mouanda explores beauty in unlikely places by asking women to pose in the same white wedding dress in different locations, from rubbish dumps to crowded trains.
Aissa’s Story
Iquo B. Essien, Nigeria/USA, 2013, 15m
French and English with English subtitles
An African immigrant housekeeper and single mother must decide whether to move on with her life or fight when the case against her assaulter is dismissed.
Kwaku Ananse
Akosua Adoma Owusu, Ghana/Mexico/USA, 2013, 26m
Outsider Nyan attends her estranged father’s funeral. Overwhelmed at the procession, she searches for him in the spirit world. Kwaku Ananse draws upon the rich mythology of Ghana and combines semi-autobiographical elements with the tale of Kwaku Ananse, a trickster in West African stories who appears as both spider and man.
Soko Sonko (The Market King)
Ekwa Msangi-Omari, Kenya/USA, 2014, 22m
Kiswahili and Sheng with English subtitles
When her mom gets sick, Kibibi’s dad takes her to the market to get her hair braided before school. A fish out of water, this well-intentioned dad goes on a roller coaster of a journey where no man has gone before… because only women have been there!
Afronauts
Frances Bodomo, Ghana/USA, 2014, 15m
On July 16, 1969, America prepares to launch Apollo 11. Thousands of miles away, the Zambia Space Academy hopes to beat America to the moon. Inspired by true events.
Kuhani
Ntare Guma Mbaho Mwine, Uganda, 2013, 7m
An experimental short inspired by Ugandan Catholic priest Father Anthony Musaala’s open letter titled “The Failure of Celibate Chastity Among Diocesan Priests.” Father Musaala is one of many Ugandans who has been persecuted as a result of the country’s recently passed Anti-Homosexuality Act. New York Premiere
May 8, 2:00pm
May 11, 3:30pm (Q&A with Iquo B. Essien, Akosua Adoma Owusu, Ekwa Msangi-Omari, Kenya, Frances Bodomo, and Ntare Guma Mbaho Mwine) 

Ninah’s Dowry
Victor Viyouh, Cameron, 2012, 95m
English, Pidgin and Babanki with English subtitles
Ninah is a mother of three stuck in an abusive relationship with no hope of change. Her family lives off her meager earnings from farm work while her husband, Memfi, drinks away his equally meager earnings as a shepherd. When she learns that her father is seriously ill and her husband refuses to let her go to him, Ninah realizes that she cannot take the abuse anymore and runs away. Memfi pursues her: he will recover the dowry he paid or take home the woman he owns—by any means necessary. This action sets off an incredible series of events with a whirlwind of suspense, thrills, and adventure that traverses the Cameroon landscape. Writer-director Victor Viyouh has crafted a powerful story with nuanced and complex characters, and Mbufung Seikeh, as Ninah, makes a screen debut that is nothing short of astonishing. Co-presented by Alwan for the Arts. New York Premiere
May 9, 2:00pm
May 9, 9:45pm

 

NINAH'S DOWRY

NINAH’S DOWRY

Of Good Report
Jahmil X.T. Qubeka, South Africa, 2013, 109m
English and Xhosa with English subtitles
Schoolteacher Parker Sithole (Mothusi Magano) arrives in a rural village with no local connections. Though his unassuming disposition and a glowing recommendation from his previous employer inspires trust and sympathy, he promptly begins a torrid affair with one of his new pupils, 16-year-old Nolitha (Petronella Tshuma). Jahmil X.T. Qubeka’s second feature delves into the type of impoverished black community that the government has ignored, making it that despair is part of the working poor’s daily life, and a man “of good report” can get away with anything. Shot in stark black and white, the film is a tribute to classic film noir while at the same time takes us out of that genre with bold artistic and political strokes (the film was banned, but quickly unbanned, by South African authorities).
May 10, 6:30pm (Q&A with Jahmil X.T. Qubeka)
May 12, 9:00pm (Q&A with Jahmil X.T. Qubeka) 

Winter of Discontent  (El sheita elli fat)
Ibrahim El Batout, Egypt, 2012, 96m
Arabic with English subtitles
Set against the momentous backdrop of the whirlwind protests in Cairo’s Tahrir Square that began on January 25th, 2011, director Ibrahim El Batout takes us on a raw and starkly moving journey into the lives of revolutionaries and counter-revolutionaries alike. Amr is an opposition activist whose face is etched with pain and sorrow; Farah is a journalist who is feeling the pressure of working for the state’s television news channel; and Adel is a security officer who tortures detainees by day and has dinner with his wife in the comfort of their home by night. Their lives will collide in this hard-hitting political thriller that lays bare the police state of Hosni Mubarak’s Egypt and offers a glimpse of the systematic torture and harassment that targeted any internal dissidence. One of the most dramatically satisfying cinematic accounts to date dealing with Egypt’s turbulent developments. Co-presented by Human Rights Watch Film Festival. U.S. Premiere

1

 

Screening with
Wooden Hands
Kaouther Ben Hania, Tunisia, 2013, 23m
Arabic with English subtitles
As the holidays end, 5-year-old Amira entertains herself before going back to Koran school. Attaching her hand to a chair with superglue looks like fun… U.S. Premiere
May 7, 4:30pm
May 11, 1:00pm

Public Screening Schedule for 2014 New York African Film Festival

Directors and guest speakers will be present during the festival (indicated by an asterisk* before the show time). ALL FILMS IN NON-ENGLISH LANGUAGES WILL BE SUBTITLED IN ENGLISH.

Screening Venue:
The Film Society of Lincoln Center:
Walter Reade Theater (165 West 65th Street, between Broadway and Amsterdam) and Francesca Beale Theater (144 West 65 Street, between Broadway and Amsterdam)

Wednesday, May 7 (Walter Reade Theater)
2:00PM  Mugabe: Villain or Hero? (116m)
4:30PM Winter of Discontent (96m) + Wooden Hands (23m)
7:30PM *Confusion Na Wa (105m)

Thursday, May 8 (Walter Reade Theater)
2:00PM New African Shorts Program (110m)
Baudouin Mouanda: Congolese Dreams (25m) + Aissa’s Story (15m) + Kwaku Ananse (26m) + Soko Sonko (The Market King) (22m) + Afronauts (15m) + Kuhani (7m)
4:30PM Aya of Yop City (85m)
6:30PM *It’s Us (Ni Si Si) (88m)
8:45PM *Grigris (101m)

Friday, May 9 (Walter Reade Theater)
2:00PM Ninah’s Dowry (95m)
4:00PM Bastards (93m) + Beleh (30m)
7:00PM *Half of a Yellow Sun (113m)
9:45PM Ninah’s Dowry (95m)

Saturday, May 10 (Walter Reade Theater)
6:30PM *Of Good Report (109m)
9:15PM *Confusion Na Wa (105m)

Sunday, May 11 (Francesca Beale Theater)
1:00PM Winter of Discontent (96m) + Wooden Hands (23m)
3:30PM *New African Shorts Program (110m)
Baudouin Mouanda: Congolese Dreams (25m) + Aissa’s Story (15m) + Kwaku Ananse (26m) + Soko Sonko (The Market King) (22m) + Afronauts (15m) + Kuhani (7m)
6:15PM *Mugabe: Villain or Hero? (116m)
9:00PM *Aya of Yop City (85m)

Monday, May 12 (Francesca Beale Theater)
1:45PM It’s Us (Ni Si Si)(88m)
3:45PM Grigris (101m)
6:00PM * Bastards (93m) + Beleh (30m)
9:00PM *Of Good Report (109m)

Tuesday, May 13 (Francesca Beale Theater)
6:30PM Sarraounia (120m)

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
Founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international cinema, the Film Society of Lincoln Center works to recognize established and emerging filmmakers, support important new work, and to enhance the awareness, accessibility, and understanding of the moving image. The Film Society produces the renowned New York Film Festival, a curated selection of the year’s most significant new film work, and presents or collaborates on other annual New York City festivals including Dance on Camera, Film Comment Selects, Human Rights Watch Film Festival, LatinBeat, New Directors/New Films, NewFest, New York African Film Festival, New York Asian Film Festival, New York Jewish Film Festival, Open Roads: New Italian Cinema and Rendez-Vous with French Cinema. In addition to publishing the award-winning Film Comment magazine, The Film Society recognizes an artist’s unique achievement in film with the prestigious Chaplin Award. The Film Society’s state-of-the-art Walter Reade Theater and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, located at Lincoln Center, provide a home for year-round programs and the New York City film community.
The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from Royal Bank of Canada, Jaeger-LeCoultre, American Airlines, The New York Times, Stella Artois, the Kobal Collection, Trump International Hotel and Tower, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

 

The 21st New York African Film Festival (Statement):

This year, Nigeria celebrates the centenary of its unification. To mark this special occasion, the 2014 NYAFF will highlight films that have been produced, inspired by, and made in Nollywood, Africa’s largest movie industry. We are proud to present our NYC audience with the winners of last year’s “African Oscars” (AMAA); Kenneth Niang’s frenetic dark comedy Confusion Na Wa and the poetical short Kwaku Ananse by Akosua Adoma Owusu, an adaptation of a mythological tale from Ghana about wisdom and belonging. We will also premiere Biyi Bandele’s highly anticipated film Half of a Yellow Sun, a rendition of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s best-selling book about the Biafran war, a movie that glows thanks to the leading performances of Thandie Newton, Anika Noni Rose and Oscar-nominee Chiwetel Ejiofor.

The animated film adaptation of the acclaimed comic series Aya of Yop City by Marguerite Abouet & Clement Oubrerie is not just an ode to young romance in West African cultures, but a nod to animation is at its golden age, encompassing every region of the world, including Africa. Victor Viyouh, Ninah’s Dowry carries in its poignant story of women empowerment the elements of a revolution. Cannes award-winner Mahamat-Saleh Haroun comes back to NYC with his latest movie Grigris, a story of love and solidarity between two outcasts in the backdrop of present-day Chad. Narratives of struggles and liberation from all around Africa and the diaspora round out the program, expanding the festival’s human scope: the incisive documentary Mugabe: Villain or Hero? by Roy Agyemang; Ibrahim El Batout’s feature Winter of Discontent, about the traumatic emotional and physical wounds of Egypt’s repressive system; and the Kenyan moral fable It’s Us (Ni Si Si), which stresses the need of forgiveness and comprehension of the other, complete the program.

Our shorts program is a fresh selection devoted to the richness and experimental elements of the genre and its special ability to convey this year’s festival theme. Young filmmakers use a wide range of approaches from sci-fi (Afronauts) to social melodrama (Aissa’s Story and Kuhani), with a special focus on comedy (Soko Sonko, Wooden Hands and Beleh) to reflect upon a wide spectrum of pressing contemporary issues.

To honor the 20th anniversary of South Africa’s independence, we will feature the controversial neo-noir Of Good Report by Jahmil XT Qubeka, which is exemplary of the vigor of South Africa’s present-day film industry. One of the most poignant epics of revolution and liberation ever filmed on the continent, Med Hondo’s masterpiece Sarraounia, winner of the first prize at FESPACO, will be the crowning jewel to close the festival.

MAYSLES CINEMA (MAY 15 – 18)

"Sodiq", a documentary by Adeyemi Michael

We have put together this wide-ranging and penetrating program as an audiovisual allegory of the power and relentless effort of African people to overcome crisis and oppression. Built around the embodiment of the male figure as a vivid force to overcome crisis, we are delighted to introduce Rehad Desai’s striking new work Miners Shot Down to NYC audiences. Recent winner of the Camera Justitia Award at the Movies that Matter Festival, Desai’s documentary follows the developments that lead to the biggest use of force by security forces of post-colonial South Africa: the Marikana Massacre of a group of striking miners in August 2012.

The session devoted to the Cultural Healing Project Short Documentary Films gathers seven shorts reflecting on the challenges and opportunities faced by Sudan. This creative peace-building project sprouts from British-Sudanese filmmaker Taghreed Elsanhouri’s proposal that a group of auteurs film the story that mattered most to them in their communities, encouraging them to express through film their cultures and traditions.

Shorts and documentaries about men and women confronting personal, social, economic, and political limitations compose this compelling selection: the struggles of an addict in Zanzibar to defeat his dependence in the short Curse of an Addict; the desperation of a woman unable to conceive a male heir in chauvinistic present-day Nigeria in the feature film B for Boy by Chika Anadu; Eliaichi Kimaro’s quest to understand his complex identity as a young Tanzanian-Korean in the US in A Lot Like You; and the different hurdles standing between a young Congolese tenor and his dream (Rêve Kakudji); a child aspiring to be a doctor subjected to a trial for murder (Sodiq); and a heterogeneous group of people plunging into the uncertain future of Mali’s annual Festival in the Desert in The Last Song Before the War.

BAM Cinématek (MAY 23 – 26)

"Legends of Madagascar", by Haminiaina Ratovoarivony

Madagascar will be in the spotlight of the festival’s BAM run, with a carefully selected
group of movies that best represent the history of the country. Angano, Angano (1989) by the tandem César Paes & Marie Clémence, and When the Stars Meet the Sea (1996) by pioneer Raymond Rajaonarivelo will be screened alongside the recent road movie Legends of Madagascar (2012) by Haminiaina Ratovoarivony.

Beyond Madagascar, we will screen other films from across the continent. From Kenya we have Something Necessary, Judy Kibinge’s insightful reflection on the effects of the war in Kenya, as well as the tragicomedy Nairobi Half Life (2012) by David ‘Tosh’ Gitonga’. Based in Ivory Coast, Lonesome Solo’s Burn It Up Djassa (2012, Ivory Coast) blends together action and music in one of the most successful examples of contemporary African noir, and acclaimed Tunisian filmmaker Taieb Louhichi presents a touching story of love and longing in The Child of the Sun (2013).

Cassa, Cassa (2013), a revealing documentary about contemporary African dance by Elodie Lefebvre, and the fast-paced Fuelling Poverty (2012) by Ishaya Baku, which exposes gasoline fraud in Nigeria, show how documentary can serve as an X-ray of present-day realities in Africa

 

20th NYAFF @ BAMcinématek – May 24-27

The New York African Film Festival returns to celebrate its 20th anniversary. The festival closes over Memorial Day Weekend May 24 to 27 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music BAMcinématek—part of the dance and music festival DanceAfrica.

Under the banner “Looking Back, Looking Forward: 20 Years of the New York African Film Festival”, our 2013 edition is dedicated to commemorating half a century of African cinema and two decades of work introducing American audiences to the best of this cinema and its protagonists.

Screening Venue:
BAMcinématek @ BAM Rose Cinemas, 30 Lafayette Avenue in Brooklyn.

SCHEDULE:

Friday, May 24
2:00PM, 7:00PM Africa Shafted: Under One Roof (55 min.) + Farewell Exile (15 min.)
4:30PM, 9:30PM Our Beloved Sudan (92 min.)

Saturday, May 25
2:00PM, 7:00PM Black Africa, White Marble (77 min.)
4:30PM, 9:30PM How to Steal 2 Million (90 min.)

Sunday, May 26
2:00PM, 4:30PM Zarafa (78 min.)
7:00PM, 9:30PM Tey/Aujourd’hui (86 min.)

Monday, May 27
2:00PM, 7:00PM Monica Wangu Wamwere: The Unbroken Spirit (71 min.)
4:30PM, 9:30PM Microphone (120 min.)

April 9, 2014 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, HOLIDAY GUIDES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Voices in Black Cinema returns! 3/27-30 BAMcinematek *bklyn

New Voices in Black Cinema returns for its fourth year with narrative features, documentaries, and shorts that redefine the black experience in America and around the world.

Presented in partnership with ActNow Foundation. Since its founding in 2005, the ActNow Foundation has been a production company and advocate for diverse, independent filmmakers and playwrights interested in producing work reflecting the infinite range of African-American and Latino experiences across the globe. ActNow hosts regular events in Brooklyn to showcase the best in independent theater and film.  Additionally, they are dedicated to fostering the growth of New York’s brightest and most talented through regular panels, speakers, and workshops.

BAM New voices in black Cinema 2014

Q&As following most screenings.

For more events during New Voices in Black Cinema please visit ActNow’s event lineup.

Our 4th annual film festival features a wide-array of films that both  

represent and challenge us to understand our 

Black cultural and historic identity.

  

Q&A’s with the filmmakers at select screenings!

Purchase Tickets HERE!

All films shown at:

BAM Rose Cinemas 

Peter Jay Sharp Building

30 Lafayette Avenue

Brooklyn,  NY 11217

 

 

FILM SCHEDULE:

THURSDAY, March 27TH
7pm- Flex is Kings
9:30pm- An American in Hollywood

FRIDAY, MARCH 28TH
2pm- Homegoings
4:30pm- Melvin & Jean (screens w/ short film ‘Even Me’)
7pm- Unsound
9:30pm- The Girl Is In Trouble

SATURDAY, MARCH 29TH
2pm- The Bicycle (screens w/ short film ‘The Unseen Beauty’)
4:30- Aya of Yop City
7pm- 1982
9:30- In Search of the Black Knight

SUNDAY, MARCH 30TH
2pm- Short Film Program “Bound Realities”
4:30pm- Let the Fire Burn
7pm- Sleeping With The Fishes
9:30pm- Brother From Another Planet (New Black Classic)

STAY TUNED also for our panel program and networking events during the festival!

FILMS:

1982 – 2013, Tommy Oliver, USA – NY Premiere!

With Hill Harper, Sharon Leal, Wayne Brady, Troi Zee, La La Anthony, and Ruby Dee. In this family drama that takes place in the early days of crack, Philadelphia father Tim Brown struggles to protect his daughter from the reality of her mother’s drug addiction. Hill Harper, who portrays Tim as streetwise man just wanting to explode from his rage and fear but tempering himself in order to save his family, turns in another brilliantly nuanced and powerful performance. This emotional debut feature film director Tommy Oliver highlights his ability to coax great acting from unexpected casting, including Sharon Leal’s chilling turninto addiction and Wayne Brady’s unrecognizable local gangster role – performances to be seen in a familiar yet totally compelling story.

-Q&A w/ Tommy Oliver

AN AMERICAN IN HOLLYWOOD – 2013, Sai Varadan, USA, 89 min.

With J.D. Williams, Hassan Johnson, Anil Rahman, Richard Carroll Jr., Silvestre Rasuk, Azure-De, and Stephen Hill. New York-born writer/director Josiah leads childhood friends Dorian and Angelo, both aspiring actors, struggling assistant director Paul, and aspiring stand-up comedian Trilok, to Los Angeles to pursue their Hollywood dreams. But through Joshiah’s relationship with budding actress Ayoka, and their shared trials of cracking Hollywood’s glass ceiling, the team soon realizes the system they are up against and the price of being ‘heroes’ in their ‘new’ world.

AYA DE YOPOUGON (Aya of Yop City) – 2012, Marguerite Abouet, France – NY Premiere!

With the voices of Aïssa Maïga, Eriq Ebouaney, Tella Kpomahou, Tatiana Rojo. Straight from the popular graphic novel series comes the animated version of ‘Aya of Yop City!’ Based on author/director Marguerite Abouet’s life in late-1970’s post-colonial Cote d’Ivoire, the story takes place in Yopougon, a working-class neighborhood of Abidjan renamed Yop City – to sound like an American movie! This is home to Aya and her two friends, Adjoua and Bintou. They’re 19-years-old, a time in your life when everything seems possible. But while Aya would like to become a doctor one day, her friends are more into nightclubbing at the local “maquis” and hunting for a husband. Around this dynamic trio, we cross characters with diverse destinies. A true chorale comedy, Aya of Yop City is a chronicle of an unexpected Africa, modern and urban.

THE BICYCLE – 2013, James Richards, USA, 72 min. – NY Premiere!

With Cinque Northern, Stormi G. Smith, Michelle Wilson, and Rob Morgan. Bobbi cannot stand Teddy. Teddy isn’t exactly thrilled with Bobbi. Now that’s all right on the playground, but Teddy is 36 and Bobbi is 10. And they live in the same house. And Teddy is going to marry Bobbi’s mother Cheryl in a few months. When Bobbi is jumped and her bicycle is stolen, Teddy realizes that finding the bully and getting back the bicycle is the perfect opportunity to repair his relationship with Bobbi and save his fiancée’s hope of them becoming a family. But surprisingly, their journey through the many worlds that make up their community will connect them in a way neither could imagine.  Taking place in the working/middle-class enclaves of Queens, NYC, The Bicycle shows a toorare and hopeful reflection of the African-American experience.

HOMEGOINGS- 2013, Christine Turner, USA, 56 min.

Through the eyes of funeral director Isaiah Owens, the beauty and grace of African-American funerals are brought to life. Filmed at Owens funeral home in New York City’s historic Harlem neighborhood, Homegoings takes an up-close look at the rarely seen world of undertaking in the Black community, where funeral rites draw on a rich palette of tradition, history, and celebration. Combining cinema verite with intimate interviews and archival photographs, the film paints and unexpectedly uplifting portrait of the dearly departed, their grieving families, and a man who sends our loved ones “home”.

-Q&A w/ Christine Turner

FLEX IS KINGS – 2013, Deidre Schoo and Michael Beach Nichols, USA, Brooklyn Premiere!

Journey to the edge of Brooklyn and of street performance itself in this sparkling portrait of the freeing power of art. Reem is the savvy promoter, Flizzo the undefeated local legend, Jay Donn the innovator with the talent to carry him far away from home. Uniting them is a competitive dance form of dramatic contortions, simulated violence, flowing footsteps and the occasional humorous touch. Welcome to the world of Flex.This inspiring documentary explores the hopes and realities of this under-acknowledged and totally unfunded group of Do-It-Yourself urban artists who use their dance skills and savvy to transform themselves to greater heights.

-Q&A w/ Deidre Schoo and Michael Beach Nicols

THE GIRL IS IN TROUBLE – 2012, Julius Onah, USA, 95 min.

With Columbus Short, Alicja Bachleda, Wilmer Valderrama and Jesse Spencer. In this thriller from Executive Producer Spike Lee, an unsuspecting Lower East Side bartender becomes entangled in a dark New York City murder mystery involving a desperate woman, a missing drug dealer, and the scion of New York’s most powerful investment firm. Director Julius Onah, recently selected as one of Filmmaker Magazine’s 25 New Faces of Independent Film, has crafted a debut that highlights the history, diversity and dangers of the Lower East Side and scultps them into an atypical film noir narrative.

-Q&A w/ Julius Onah

IN SEARCH OF THE BLACK KNIGHT – 2013, Tamarat Makonnen, USA, 73 min.

Combining professional advice, street interviews and sketch comedy, In Search of the Black Knight takes a humorous look at the current state of African American romantic relationships. Follow film director Tamarat Makonnen as he travels across the country in an attempt to expose the truth and absuridity behind this sensitive topic in this funny and thought-provoking film that will have you rethinking what you assumed about the opposite sex!

-Q&A w/ Tamarat Makonnen

LET THE FIRE BURN-2013, Jason Osder, USA, 95 min.

A found-footage film that unfurls with the tension of a great thriller, this award-winning documentary chronicles a harrowing day in 1985, on which a longtime feud between the city of Philadelphia and controversial radical urban group MOVE came to a deadly climax. By order of local authorities, police dropped military-grade explosives onto a MOVE-occupied rowhouse. TV cameras captured the conflagration that quickly escalated-and resulted in the tragic deaths of eleven people (including five children) and the destruction of 61 homes. First-time filmmaker Osder brings to life one of the most tumultuous and largely forgotten clashes between government and citizens in modern American history.

-Q&A w/ Jason Osder.

“MELVIN & JEAN – 2012, Maia Weschler, USA/France, 60 min.

When Melvin and Jean McNair hijacked a plane from Detroit to Algeria in 1972 to join the International Section of the Black Panthers, they called it an act of political resistance to racism and the war in Vietnam War. In reality, the hijacking was an act of desperation committed by two young people who saw no other way to escape what they felt was the constant state of racial oppression in the United States.For the past 35 years, the McNairs have lived as model citizens in France, where they served prison time for the hijacking. Now, they want the freedom to return home without spending the rest of their lives behind bars.Melvin & Jean: An American Story follows the McNairs from revolt and exile to renewal and reconciliation. It challenges viewers to consider whether a lifetime of good can make up for a criminal act. Forty years after the hijacking, Melvin and Jean are still coming to terms with their crime and it’s lifelong consequences.

-Q&A w/ Maia Weschler

SLEEPING WITH THE FISHES – 2013, Nicole Gomez Fisher, USA, 95 min.

With Gina Rodriguez, Ana Ortiz, Priscilla Lopez, Tibor Feldman, Steven Strait. In this coming-of-age zany Latino-Jewish family comedy Alexis Fish (played by Filly Brownstar Gina Rodriguez), flat broke and broken-hearted after the death of her philandering husband, is struggling to survive on her own. When she begrudgingly returns home to Brooklyn for a distant aunt’s funeral, Alexis winds up on a journey of self-discovery and newromance, despite the antics of her well-intentioned but overbearing mother. With its fair share of “ay dios mio” and “oy vey” moments, Sleeping With the Fishes comes to life with colorful characters and one-liners that can only be found in a Latino Jewish home in Brooklyn.

UNSOUND – 2013, Darious J. Britt, USA, 93 min. – World Premiere!

With To-ree-nee Wolf, Darious J. Britt, RD Mower. An ambitious, young filmmaker is in the middle of creating his ultimate career-launching Volkswagen documentary when he receives the call he’s been dreading: his mother has succumbed to yet another episode of psychosis. Now, he must resort to extreme measures to save her from herself and reclaim his life. Shining a light on the struggles of dealing with a family member with mental illness, Unsound is an introspective and heartbreaking debut from writer/director/actor Darious Britt.

SHORT FILM SERIES – BOUND REALITIES – 93 min.

Fiction and truth are often closer than most people care to admit. These selections of films skirt the line of both those realities with films that show the ties that connect us all on a greater level. Selections include Kevin Walker’s Yin & Yang, about a young man’s attractionto both his girlfriend and his best guy friend as told through spoken word, Stefani Saintonge’s Seventh Grade which focuses on a young girl’s jarring transition from playing with dolls into bawdy adolescence, and actor/director Ghenga Akinnagbe’s flip on NYC’s systemic police policies against Black & Latino men entitled Stop+Frisk.

The full lineup is as follows:
Cakes Da Killa: No Homo (dir. Jatovia Gary)
Seventh Grade (dir. Stefani Saintonge)
Stop+Frisk (dir. Ghenga Akinnagbe)
Ying and Yang (dir. Kevin D. Walker)
Touch (dir. Shola Amoo)
Fleecing Led Zeppelin (dir. Gabriel Tolliver)
Deluge (dir. Nijla Baseema Mu’min)

Open City Mixtape: Kids (dir. A.V. Rockwell)

-Q&A w/ Directors/ Filmmakers

NEW BLACK CLASSIC– THE BROTHER FROM ANOTHER PLANET – 1984, John Sayles, USA, 104 min

With Joe Morton, Steve James, Bill Cobbs, Daryl Edwards, Tom Wright, Maggie Renzi, DeeDee Bridgewater, Herbert Newsome, David Straithairn. In this underrated dramatic comedy from modern auteur John Sayles, in which star Joe Morton had his breakout film role, an alien and escaped slave who, while fleeing “Another Planet”, has crash-landed in Upper New York Harbor. Resembling an African-American man, save his big hairy feet and psionic powers, the mute” Brother” struggles to adapt to his new surroundings while staying out of sight from the two white ‘Men in Black’ hunting him, and gets by thanks to the his sweet nature and the Harlem community coming to his aid. An allegory about the immigrant experience and assimilation, The Brother From Another Planet celebrates its 30th anniversary this year and has been selected as New Voices in Black Cinema’s newest New Black Classic – an older Black film that needs to be seen by all.

-Q&A w/ John Sayles

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE!

For more information regarding participation as a SPONSOR, ADVERTISER, OR PARTNER, contact Tiasia O’Brien at Tiasia@actnowproduction.org.

To volunteer and for more information on the festival go to our website www.actnowproduction.org or

contact Martin M. at Martin@actnowproduction.org.

SEE YOU IN BROOKLYN!

BAMcinematek will present thirteen feature films and 10 shorts this year. With a world premiere screening of Unsound, New York premieres of 1982The Bicycle, and Aya De Yop City and the first screening of Flex is Kings in Brooklyn, this year’s line up promises to add a new flair of diversity to New Voices in Black Cinema.
WORLD PREMIERE
Unsound
Fri, March 28th, 6:45pm
A filmmaker resorts to extreme measures to help his mother through her mental illness. Directed by Darious J. Britt.
NY PREMIERE
The Bicycle
Sat, Mar 29th, 2pm
This whimsical, family-friendly film follows a man’s attempts to repair his relationship his daughter-to-be. Screens with the short film
The Unseen Beauty.
NY PREMIERE
1982
Sat, Mar 29th, 6:45pm
Starring Hill Harper, Wayne Brady and Ruby Dee, this film is a drug addiction drama set in 1980’s Philadelphia.
New Voices in Black Cinema presents it’s 1st 
animated feature film!
Sat, Mar 29th, 4:30pm
Directed by Marguerite Abouet
and Clément Oubrerie

Based on Marguerite Abouet’s popular graphic novel series about her life in 1970s post-colonial Cote d’Ivoire, this animated film chronicles the story of 19-year-old Aya and her friends Adjoua and Bintou, who live in the working-class neighborhood of Abidjian (renamed Yop City). While Aya would like to become a doctor one day, her friends are more interested in nightclubbing at the local maquis and hunting for a husband. A comedy filled with diverse voices and characters, Aya of Yop City is a portrait of modern urban Africa. Buy tickets!

We are still seeking dedicated volunteers to work with our annual Festival.Volunteer positions are available with:Administrative Support, Hospitality, Press/Publicity, Festival Production, Promotions, Registration, Social Media, and Sponsorship/Marketing.  

Volunteers are needed during the festival as well as in the weeks leading up to the event.

This is a great opportunity to work with a respected arts organization and acquire valuable contacts in independent film. Volunteers also receive access to Festival screenings after a minimum number of service hours.

Click below to email Martin Majeske and inquire about volunteer opportunities!


Email us to
volunteer now!

March 18, 2014 Posted by | ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

RENDEZ-VOUS With FRENCH CINEMA 2014 3/6-16 nyc

FSLC Logo  Unifrance logo

 

RENDEZ-VOUS WITH FRENCH CINEMA 2014

The 19th edition of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, the Film Society of Lincoln Center and Unifrance Films’ celebrated annual showcase of the best in contemporary French film, hits screens at The Film Society, the IFC Center and BAMcinématek,

The lineup includes established masters like Bertrand Tavernier, Agnès Jaoui, François Ozon, and Jacques Doillon; critics’ favorites Serge Bozon, Michel Gondry, and the Larrieu brothers; and polymath talents, actor-turned-directors Emmanuelle Bercot, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, and Nicole Garcia, who have fully come into their own as filmmakers.

suzanne-4

Alongside these known names are the key figures of what has been called France’s next New Wave: a whole raft of emerging talents, including first- and second-time directors Ruben Alves, Sébastien Betbeder, Guillaume Brac, Thierry de Peretti, Katell Quillévéré, Axelle Ropert, Justine Triet, and Rebecca Zlotowski. And as the original New Wave was very much a boys’ club, it’s worth noting that nearly half the films in this year’s selection were directed by women.

March 6 – 16, 2014.

Films, Descriptions & Schedule
Main Venues: BAMcinématek (BAM)/Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center (EBM)/
IFC Center (IFC)/Walter Reade Theater (WRT)
Opening Night: The Paris Theater (PARIS)

OPENING NIGHT
ON MY WAY
Emmanuelle Bercot, France, 2014, 113m
In French with English subtitles
Catherine Deneuve plays against type and delivers a performance unlike any other in her legendary career as Bettie, a former Breton beauty queen turned bistro owner, in Emmanuelle Bercot’s fourth feature. When her mother (Claude Gensac) tells her that her married lover has ditched her for a 25-year-old beautician’s assistant, Bettie takes to the road with no particular destination in mind and eventually winds up at a dive bar named Le Ranch, where an evening of drunken revelry sets the stage for much tomfoolery to come. Bettie’s resentful daughter Muriel (French pop musician Camille) then asks her mother to chauffeur her son Charly (Nemo Schiffman) to his grandfather’s, and the pair sets out on a trip that will ultimately lead Bettie to revisit her past even as she travels further away from it. Nominated for two 2014 César Awards: Catherine Deneuve (Best Actress) and Nemo Schiffman (Most Promising Actor). A Cohen Media Group release.
Thursday, March 6, 7:30pm – PARIS; Friday, March 7, 6:45pm – BAM; Saturday, March 8, 7:00pm – IFC
In Person: Catherine Deneuve      

CLOSING NIGHT

OK quai-d-orsay
THE FRENCH MINISTER (QUAI D’ORSAY)
Bertrand Tavernier, France, 2013, 113m
In French with English subtitles
The veteran auteur Bertrand Tavernier returns to Rendez-Vous with a sly, energetic film about the daily grind of diplomacy. Arthur (Raphaël Personnaz), a graduate of all the right schools, is the new speechwriter for the Minister of Foreign Affairs (a hilarious Thierry Lhermitte). While he tries to navigate internal politics, the various strong personalities around him (such as a ruthless policy advisor played by Julie Gayet), and the stress of finding the Minister’s “voice,” Arthur must also write a speech for the Minister that will hopefully put them both in the history books. Based on co-screenwriter Antonin Baudry’s own graphic novels about his experience working in the Foreign Ministry under former Foreign (and Prime) Minister Dominique de Villepin, The French Minister takes us for a breathless ride through the halls of French government. Nominated for three 2014 César Awards: Julie Gayet (Best Supporting Actress), Niels Arestrup (Best Supporting Actor), and Antonin Baudry, Christophe Blain and Bertrand Tavernier (Best Adapted Screenplay). A Sundance Selects release.
Sunday, March 16, 3:40pm, 9:00pm – WRT
In Person: Bertrand Tavernier & Screenwriter Antonin Baudry

2 AUTUMNS 3 WINTERS (2 AUTOMNES 3 HIVERS)
Sébastien Betbeder, France, 2013, 90m
In French with English subtitles
Director Sébastien Betbeder follows his acclaimed debut, Nights With Theodore, with an endearing, inventive romantic comedy, steeped in offbeat charm and an offhand cinephilia. Sad-sack Arman (Vincent Macaigne) first meets Amélie (Maud Wyler) when he bumps into her while jogging; his attempts at connecting with her fail one after the other, until circumstances grant him the opportunity to rescue her from would-be muggers. Thus begins the story of a relationship by turns breezy and momentous. Alongside his longtime friend from art school, Benjamin (Bastien Bouillon), Arman navigates life with his newfound love. Directly addressing the camera and in monologues that comment on their respective situations, these winning characters describe the trajectory of old-fashioned relationships in this millennial age. A Film Movement release.
Saturday, March 8, 4:00pm – WRT; Sunday, March 9, 5:30pm – IFC
In Person: Sébastien Betbeder

NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
AGE OF PANIC (LA BATAILLE DE SOLFÉRINO)
Justine Triet, France, 2013, 90m
In French with English subtitles
During a time of great political change, a frazzled young mother tries to keep it together on the home front. Laetitia (Laetitia Dosch), a cable news reporter off to cover the 2012 French presidential elections, leaves her daughters in the care of a hapless babysitter (Marc-Antoine Vaugeois) with strict instructions to keep them away from Vincent (Vincent Macaigne), her ex-husband and their father. But Vincent, determined to see his kids, disrupts the already chaotic household by enlisting a neighbor to negotiate a divorce agreement with Laetitia – while she’s out reporting amid election crowds in front of Socialist Party headquarters. In her enormously promising first feature, a very funny comedy of discomfort infused with documentary-style energy, director Justine Triet pits micro social problems against the macro body politic of France, all within the frame of one manic day in Paris. Nominated for Best First Film in the 2014 César Awards.
Friday, March 7, 6:30pm – WRT; Saturday, March 8, 3:00pm – BAM; Sunday, March 9, 7:30pm – IFC; Monday, March 10, 1:00pm – WRT
In Person: Justine Triet

LES APACHES
Thierry de Peretti, France, 2013, 82m
In French with English subtitles
On the island of Corsica, a tension constantly simmers between the wealthy tourists and the lower-class locals. Aziz and his friends aren’t considering any of this when they break into an empty seaside house, looking for some illicit fun and a pool to lounge beside. But when the owners arrive for their vacation, there are dire consequences for the teenagers, who prove exceedingly easy to track down. Unbeknownst to Aziz, his pals also stole a pair of hunting rifles during the break-in, and might not be as loyal to him as he is to them. An atmospheric thriller simmering with adolescent sexuality,

Films, Descriptions & Schedule
Main Venues:
BAMcinÉmatek (BAM)/
Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center (EBM)/
IFC Center (IFC)/
Walter Reade Theater (WRT)
Opening Night: The Paris Theater (PARIS)
OPENING NIGHT
ON MY WAY
Emmanuelle Bercot, France, 2014, 113m
In French with English subtitles
Catherine Deneuve plays against type and delivers a performance
unlike any other in her legendary career as Bettie, a former Breton
beauty queen turned bistro owner, in Emmanuelle Bercot’s fourth
feature. When her mother (Claude Gensac) tells her that her married
lover has ditched her for a 25-year-old beautician’s assistant,
Bettie takes to the road with no particular destination in mind and
eventually winds up at a dive bar named Le Ranch, where an evening of
drunken revelry sets the stage for much tomfoolery to come. Bettie’s
resentful daughter Muriel (French pop musician Camille) then asks her
mother to chauffeur her son Charly (Nemo Schiffman) to his
grandfather’s, and the pair sets out on a trip that will ultimately
lead Bettie to revisit her past even as she travels further away from
it. Nominated for two 2014 CÉsar Awards: Catherine Deneuve (Best
Actress) and Nemo Schiffman (Most Promising Actor). A Cohen Media
Group release.
Thursday, March 6, 7:30pm – PARIS; Friday, March 7, 6:45pm – BAM;
Saturday, March 8, 7:00pm – IFC
In Person: Catherine Deneuve
CLOSING NIGHT
THE FRENCH MINISTER (QUAI D’ORSAY)
Bertrand Tavernier, France, 2013, 113m
In French with English subtitles
A must-see film. Who realized Tavernier was funny? Outtakes during credits?
We loved his first film, THE CLOCKMAKER, above all, but we have a sneaking
suspicion this may become our second favorite.
The veteran auteur Bertrand Tavernier returns to Rendez-Vous with a
sly, energetic film about the daily grind of diplomacy. Arthur
(RaphaËl Personnaz), a graduate of all the right schools, is the new
speechwriter for the Minister of Foreign Affairs (a hilarious Thierry
Lhermitte). While he tries to navigate internal politics, the various
strong personalities around him (such as a ruthless policy advisor
played by Julie Gayet), and the stress of finding the Minister’s
“voice,” Arthur must also write a speech for the Minister that will
hopefully put them both in the history books. Based on
co-screenwriter Antonin Baudry’s own graphic novels about his
experience working in the Foreign Ministry under former Foreign (and
Prime) Minister Dominique de Villepin, The French Minister takes us
for a breathless ride through the halls of French government.
Nominated for three 2014 CÉsar Awards: Julie Gayet (Best Supporting
Actress), Niels Arestrup (Best Supporting Actor), and Antonin Baudry,
Christophe Blain and Bertrand Tavernier (Best Adapted Screenplay). A
Sundance Selects release.
Sunday, March 16, 3:40pm, 9:00pm – WRT
In Person: Bertrand Tavernier & Screenwriter Antonin Baudry
2 AUTUMNS 3 WINTERS (2 AUTOMNES 3 HIVERS)
SÉbastien Betbeder, France, 2013, 90m
In French with English subtitles
Director SÉbastien Betbeder follows his acclaimed debut, Nights With
Theodore, with an endearing, inventive romantic comedy, steeped in
offbeat charm and an offhand cinephilia. Sad-sack Arman (Vincent
Macaigne) first meets AmÉlie (Maud Wyler) when he bumps into her
while jogging; his attempts at connecting with her fail one after the
other, until circumstances grant him the opportunity to rescue her
from would-be muggers. Thus begins the story of a relationship by
turns breezy and momentous. Alongside his longtime friend from art
school, Benjamin (Bastien Bouillon), Arman navigates life with his
newfound love. Directly addressing the camera and in monologues that
comment on their respective situations, these winning characters
describe the trajectory of old-fashioned relationships in this
millennial age. A Film Movement release.
Saturday, March 8, 4:00pm – WRT; Sunday, March 9, 5:30pm – IFC
In Person: SÉbastien Betbeder
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
AGE OF PANIC (LA BATAILLE DE SOLFÉRINO)
Justine Triet, France, 2013, 90m
In French with English subtitles
A tough film to gauge. The mix of documentary footage is exhilirating,
but the constant presence of  lead actor Vincent Macaigne, perhaps France’s
answer to the American mumblecore style of acting, is unexpected but not
always welcome. As much as The Marchers depicts the France of 1983, does this
film embody the spirit of France in 2012 and do the leads then embody different
aspects of the French spirit or body politic?
During a time of great political change, a frazzled young mother
tries to keep it together on the home front. Laetitia (Laetitia
Dosch), a cable news reporter off to cover the 2012 French
presidential elections, leaves her daughters in the care of a hapless
babysitter (Marc-Antoine Vaugeois) with strict instructions to keep
them away from Vincent (Vincent Macaigne), her ex-husband and their
father. But Vincent, determined to see his kids, disrupts the already
chaotic household by enlisting a neighbor to negotiate a divorce
agreement with Laetitia – while she’s out reporting amid election
crowds in front of Socialist Party headquarters. In her enormously
promising first feature, a very funny comedy of discomfort infused
with documentary-style energy, director Justine Triet pits micro
social problems against the macro body politic of France, all within
the frame of one manic day in Paris. Nominated for Best First Film in
the 2014 CÉsar Awards.
Friday, March 7, 6:30pm – WRT; Saturday, March 8, 3:00pm – BAM;
Sunday, March 9, 7:30pm – IFC; Monday, March 10, 1:00pm – WRT
In Person: Justine Triet
LES APACHES
Thierry de Peretti, France, 2013, 82m
In French with English subtitles
On the island of Corsica, a tension constantly simmers between the
wealthy tourists and the lower-class locals. Aziz and his friends
aren’t considering any of this when they break into an empty seaside
house, looking for some illicit fun and a pool to lounge beside. But
when the owners arrive for their vacation, there are dire
consequences for the teenagers, who prove exceedingly easy to track
down. Unbeknownst to Aziz, his pals also stole a pair of hunting
rifles during the break-in, and might not be as loyal to him as he is
to them. An atmospheric thriller simmering with adolescent sexuality,
Les Apaches explores aspects of French culture that the mainstream
cinema often ignores. The title refers to the slang term used by
Paris police for juvenile delinquents, and the film, whose young
characters are of Arab and Moroccan descent, narrows in on the
subject of racial tension with considerable intelligence and nuance.
Monday, March 10, 12:00pm – EBM; Tuesday, March 11, 6:30pm – WRT;
Wednesday, March 12, 8:00pm – IFC
In Person: Thierry de Peretti will attend the March 12 screening
A CASTLE IN ITALY (UN CHÂTEAU EN ITALIE)
Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, France, 2013, 104m
In English, French and Italian with English subtitles
Valeria Bruni Tedeschi’s semi-autobiographical third feature — her
first film since the acclaimed Actresses (2007) — is as restless as
the character she plays in it. The actress-director-screenwriter (she
co-wrote the film with NoÉmie Lvovsky and AgnÈs de Sacy) crafts a
sad, whimsical and tender portrait of a family whose glory days are
over, and who must confront some ugly facts about their present
reality: financial troubles, a younger brother dying of AIDS, a
sprawling estate they can no longer maintain. Louise (Bruni Tedeschi)
herself is approaching her mid 40s, and wants desperately to have a
child and find enduring love. This boldly self-revealing, possibly
cathartic work draws both directly and obliquely from Bruni
Tedeschi’s real life: Louis Garrel, her former partner, plays Nathan,
her young French lover; Nathan’s father in the film is a renowned
filmmaker who directs his son, as does Garrel’s father, Philippe; and
Valeria’s own mother, pianist Marisa Borini, simply plays herself.
Marisa Borini is nominated for Best Supporting Actress at the 2014
CÉsar Awards.
Monday, March 12, 6:00pm – IFC; Thursday, March 13, 9:00pm – WRT;
Sunday, March 16, 6:30pm – WRT
EASTERN BOYS
Robin Campillo, France, 2013, 128m
In English, French and Russian with English subtitles
Arriving from all over the Eastern Bloc, the men who loiter around
the Gare du Nord train station in Paris are scraping by however they
can, forming gangs for support and protection, ever fearful of being
caught by the police and deported. When the middle-aged, bourgeois
Daniel (Olivier Rabourdin) approaches a boyishly handsome Ukrainian
who calls himself Marek for a date, he learns the young man is
willing to do anything for some cash. What Daniel intends only as
sex-for-hire begets a home invasion and then an unexpectedly profound
relationship. The drastically different circumstances of the two
men’s lives reveal hidden facets of the city they share. Presented in
four parts, this absorbing, continually surprising film by Robin
Campillo (director of Les Revenants and a frequent collaborator of
Laurent Cantet’s) is centered around relationships that defy easy
categorization, in which motivations and desires are poorly
understood even by those to whom they belong.
Monday, March 10, 9:30pm – IFC; Tuesday, March 11, 8:45pm – WRT;
Wednesday, March 12, 1:00pm – WRT
In Person: Robin Campillo
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
THE GILDED CAGE (LA CAGE DORÉE)
Ruben Alves, France/Portugal, 2013, 95m
In French and Portuguese with English subtitles
JosÉ (Joaquim de Alameida) and Maria (Rita Blanco), a middle-aged
Portuguese couple, have been living in Paris for 30 years. He is a
respected construction foreman and she is the concierge at the ritzy
apartment building where they live in a cramped ground-floor flat.
Their life has been a fulfilling one, with a grown daughter and a
teenage son who have spent their lives in France. But when JosÉ
inherits the family winery and the opportunity to finally return home
becomes tantalizingly within reach, they begin to question the level
of comfort they’ve achieved and whether it all has been worth the
cost. Alves’s immensely likable semi-autobiographical comedy-drama
features a sprawling cast of oddballs and mixes farcical situations
with razor-sharp observations about class and generational
differences and the difficulty of balancing family and work.
Nominated for Best First Film at the 2014 CÉsar Awards.
Sunday, March 9, 9:30pm – WRT; Tuesday, March 11, 6:00pm – IFC;
Saturday, March 15, 7:15pm – WRT
US PREMIERE
GOING AWAY (UN BEAU DIMANCHE)
Nicole Garcia, France, 2013, 95m
In French with English subtitles
Veteran director-actress Nicole Garcia’s refreshingly understated
seventh feature follows the formation of an improbable bond between
Baptiste (Pierre Rochefort), a commitment-averse substitute teacher,
and Mathias (Mathias Brezot), a young student emotionally neglected
by his separated parents. Filling in as a temporary surrogate father
for Mathias, Baptiste soon finds himself entangled with Mathias’s
hard-working, hard-partying mother, Sandra (Louise Bourgoin). When a
couple of thugs show up to collect an outstanding debt, the
chivalrous Baptiste takes it upon himself to resolve the conflict.
Full of sharply and empathetically drawn characters (embodied by an
excellent cast, including Dominique Sanda as Baptiste’s mother),
Garcia’s intimate film also speaks profoundly about the
responsibilities bound up in the connections people forge.
Friday, March 7, 6:00pm – IFC; Monday, March 10, 4:00pm – EBM;
Saturday, March 15, 9:30pm – WRT
GRAND CENTRAL
Rebecca Zlotowski, France/Austria, 2013, 94m
In French with English subtitles
A nuclear power plant serves as the setting for a forbidden romance
as volatile as the facility itself in the intense, brilliantly acted
second feature from Rebecca Zlotowski (Belle Epine). Gary (A
Prophet’s Tahar Rahim) is a poor, unskilled laborer looking for easy
money and a place to fit in. Karole (LÉa Seydoux) is the fiancÉe of
longtime plant employee Toni (Denis MÉnochet), one of the many
underpaid men and women who daily brave illness and possible death
from radiation poisoning. Soon Gary and Karole fall rapturously in
love, and their moonlit trysts in the bucolic surrounding countryside
pose a growing threat to the staff’s tight-knit bonds. Zlotowski
focuses both on the everyday routines of the workers and on the
swooning passions of the love triangle at the film’s heart, with
electronica pulsating on the soundtrack as her characters gamble ever
more perilously in work and love. Olivier Gourmet is nominated for
Best Supporting Actor at the 2014 CÉsar Awards.
Friday, March 7, 9:00pm – WRT; Saturday, March 8, 4:45pm – IFC;
Sunday, March 9, 4:30pm – BAM; Monday, March 10, 3:30pm – WRT
In Person: Rebecca Zlotowski
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
HIS WIFE (SON ÉPOUSE)
Michel Spinosa, France/India/Belgium, 2014, 108m
In English, French and Tamil with English subtitles
In Michel Spinosa’s emotional, superbly acted drama, a widower named
Joseph (Yvan Attal) travels to India to meet Gracie (Janagi), a young
Tamil newlywed who knew his late wife, Catherine (Charlotte
Gainsbourg), and whose erratic behavior suggests that she may be
possessed by the dead woman. Soon enough, Joseph’s journey to the
small village near Pondicherry where Gracie lives unveils itself to
be not only a form of tribute to Catherine but also a bid for
forgiveness. Spinosa (who co-wrote Rendez-Vous 2013 selection Renoir)
coaxes magnetic, complex performances from Attal and especially
Janagi, who is a revelation as a woman under the influence – of grief
and even more mysterious forces.
Friday, March 7, 10:15pm – IFC; Wednesday, March 12, 1:00pm – EBM;
6:30pm – WRT
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
IF YOU DON’T, I WILL (ARRÊTE OU JE CONTINUE)
Sophie FilliÈres, France, 2014, 102m
In French with English subtitles
Mathieu Amalric and Emmanuelle Devos are Pierre and Pomme, a couple
whose marriage is on the verge of collapsing. As Pierre goes through
the motions of his daily routine while hardly disguising his anger, a
bewildered Pomme slowly absorbs all the signs of impending crisis,
searching for ways to reconnect with her partner. “We don’t dance
anymore, we grow old,” she complains, before pulling Pierre onto the
dance floor at a party. But their attempts to rekindle the passion
are inevitably, sometimes comically, thwarted. Can they redefine
their relationship or will they end up going their separate ways?
During one of their weekend hikes, Pomme reaches a breaking point.

Love Battles

Love Battles

Jacques Doillon | 2013 | 99 mins

North American Premiere! Director Jacques Doillon in person!

Two lovers unable to get on the same page, psychosexually speaking, strive to resolve the impasse through beautifully filmed wrestling matches that test their bodies as much as their souls.

For lovers of mud wrestling. Not quite Last Tango.

Read more »

Monday, March 10

6:30pm

Love Is the Perfect Crime

Love Is the Perfect Crime

Arnaud Larrieu | Jean-Marie Larrieu | 2013 | 110 mins

U.S. Premiere!

Mathieu Amalric plays a university professor whose perfect life turns sour when his latest undergraduate conquest goes missing in this darkly funny thriller with an explosive finale.

One of the better films at the festival with subtle tonal shifts, gorgeous scenery and settings, and twists that are ultimately satisfying. It’s good to be Marc. Played by the reliably terrific Mathieu Amalric (Bond villain in Quantum of Solace), he holds a prestigious teaching position at what must be the world’s most beautiful university and is desired by seemingly every comely coed in the Swiss Alps. But this idyllic existence goes awry the morning after, when his latest undergraduate conquest vanishes. Suddenly, it’s not so good to be Marc. A detective begins snooping around and asking questions. Marc’s supervisor, who has a thing for Marc’s sister (whose affections for Marc appear more than familial), informs him that his position may no longer be secure. A sexy student from a prominent family wishes to supplement her education with some extracurricular instruction. And then there’s the matter of the missing coed’s gorgeous and unrelenting stepmother… Everything comes together in this darkly funny thriller with an unexpectedly explosive finale from Arnaud and Jean-Marie Larrieu.

Friday, March 07

1:00pm

Monday, March 10

9:15pm

The Marchers
la-marche-3

The Marchers

Nabil Ben Yadir | 2013 | 120 mins

North American Premiere! Director Nabil Ben Yadir in person on March 9!

This rousing film reconstructs a decisive event in the history of French racial politics: a Mitterrand-era demonstration against racism and inequality in which nine people marched 930 miles from Marseilles to Paris.

A moving and quietly outstanding film that effectively recreates the time and emotions of 1983 France. Clearly one of our favorites of the festival this year. Nominated for a 2014 Lumiere Award for Best screenplay.

Nabil Ben Yadir’s rousing sophomore feature reconstructs a decisive event in the history of French racial politics: a Mitterrand-era demonstration against racism and inequality in which nine people marched 930 miles from Marseilles to Paris, where they were met by more than 100,000 supporters. Compelled to undertake their transnational trek when Mohamed (Tewfik Jallab) and Hassan (Jamel Debbouze) are victimized by the police, the band of protesters—inspired by Martin Luther King, Jr. and Gandhi—have their resolve tested, but are obliged to soldier on when a Maghrebi teenager is brutally murdered, encountering ever more prejudice en route. The Marchers is a monument to the courage of a handful of activists as well as an edifying account of how a small group can bring about enormous shifts in the national consciousness.

Following the March 9 screening, Nabil Ben Yadir and filmmaker/producer Electra Weston will participate in a discussion on telling history through film and the depiction of minority groups in France and the USA.

Sunday, March 09

1:30pm

Friday, March 14

3:30pm

Miss and the Doctors

Miss and the Doctors

Axelle Ropert | 2013 | 100 mins

New York Premiere! Director Axelle Ropert in person on March 8!

Two sibling doctors take on a young diabetic patient and both fall for the girl’s lovely mother, who tends bar at a local watering hole, testing their fraternal bonds and professional relationship.

Another favorite of ours because of its understated charm, truthful performances and memorable soundtrack. Sibling doctors Boris (filmmaker Cédric Kahn, in a revelatory performance) and Dimitri (Laurent Stocker) share a pediatric practice in a working-class Paris arrondissement. But their fraternal bonds and professional relationship are tested when they take on a young diabetic patient and both fall for the girl’s lovely mother (Louise Bourgoin), who tends bar at a local watering hole. The possibility of sharing a life with this woman and her daughter represents something quite different for each brother, and director Axelle Ropert (The Wolberg Family) places their burgeoning rivalry at the heart of this witty, passionate, beautifully observed drama. The cinematography by Céline Bozon (the sister of Tip Top director Serge) gives the urban setting, with its high-rise apartment blocks and Chinese restaurants, a sense of everyday magic, as does Benjamin Esdraffo’s lilting score.

Saturday, March 08

1:00pm

Monday, March 10

1:50pm

Mood Indigo

Mood Indigo

Michel Gondry | 2013 | 95 mins

New York Premiere! Michel Gondry in person!

Romain Duris plays a wealthy bachelor who puts aside his eccentric hobbies to find love (with Audrey Tautou, naturally) in Michael Gondry’s manic, visionary adaptation of Boris Vian’s Foam of the Daze.

Our impression of it was solely as an art piece to be experienced as one would a museum piece. Other critics had more favorable opinions than ours. Your mileage may vary, but be forewarned. Not one of our favorites at this festival.

Read more »

Sunday, March 09

7:00pm

Playing Dead
je-fais-le-mort-3

Playing Dead

Jean-Paul Salomé | 2013 | 104 mins

North American Premiere! Director Jean-Paul Salomé in person on March 8!

A down-and-out actor takes a gig in a homicide reenactment at a ski resort, sparking an antagonism-turned-romance with the chief investigator and hilariously complicating every step of the process.

It hit us at the right wintry moment and we found it very appealing. Loved the actors, enjoyed the film. We believe the Dardenne brothers served in a producer capacity, but it has a life of its own.

North American Premiere! Director Jean-Paul Salomé in person on March 8!

In Jean-Paul Salomé’s seventh feature, the hilarious François Damiens plays Jean, a down-and-out and underemployed actor (not to mention a former César winner!) who, after years of playing tiny roles on canceled TV shows and starring in embarrassing commercials, takes a gig as a performer in a homicide reenactment “produced” by the police at a ski resort in the French Alps. Being an expert at unnecessarily complicating or otherwise ruining any situation in which he finds himself, Jean quickly gets in the way of the case’s chief investigator (Géraldine Nakache), sparking an antagonism-turned-romance as well as a suspenseful whodunit rich with twists, turns and amusing instances of Jean taking himself much too seriously. Filming the reenactment as though it were a movie shoot, Salomé slyly juxtaposes the worlds of forensics and film making, and the result is a rare, uproarious murder mystery.

Saturday, March 08

9:00pm

Friday, March 14

1:00pm

School of Babel
OK la-cour-de-babel

School of Babel

Julie Bertuccelli | 2013 | 89 mins

North American Premiere!

Shot over a year at a secondary school in Paris’s 10th arrondissement, this observational documentary is a kind of nonfiction counterpart to The Class and a multifaceted look at the French melting pot.

See it. Extremely touching.

North American Premiere!

At a secondary school in Paris’s 10th arrondissement there is a “reception class,” where students between the ages of 11 and 15 are taught their first lessons in French. Some of these immigrant children, newly arrived, know a few phrases in the language of their adopted country; others can’t speak a word. Their families have come from all across the globe, from Ireland, Senegal, Morocco, Brazil, and China, fleeing persecution or just looking for a fresh start. Shot over a year, this observational documentary by Julie Bertuccelli (Since Otar Left, The Tree) is a kind of nonfiction counterpart to Laurent Cantet’s Palme d’Or-winning The Class, staying within the confines of the school and recording the children’s candid, sometimes heated discussions and interactions between parents and teachers. The result is both illuminating and extremely touching, a multifaceted look at the French melting pot, its frustrations and its hopes for the future.

Sunday, March 16

1:30pm

Suzanne
OK suzanne-6

Suzanne

Katell Quillévéré | 2013 | 94 mins

New York Premiere! Director Katell Quillévéré in person on March 9!

A teenage mother takes up with a local bad boy while her widowed father and older sister try their best to keep the family together in this coming-of-age story of epic proportions.

Read more »

Sunday, March 09

4:30pm

Wednesday, March 12

4:00pm

Tip Top
tip-top-4

Tip Top

Serge Bozon | 2013 | 106 mins

U.S. Premiere! Director Serge Bozon in person!

An eccentric internal affairs agent (Isabelle Huppert) and her mousy new partner are summoned to investigate the murder of an Algerian informant in this one-of-a-kind screwball procedural.

Read more »

Friday, March 14

1:00pm 9:00pm

Tonnerre
tonnerre

Tonnerre

Guillaume Brac | 2013 | 100 mins

North American Premiere! Director Guillaume Brac in person on March 14!

A struggling musician moves home to write and soon gets wrapped up in a fling with a beautiful young journalist that ends as suddenly as it started, leading to a dark and troubling obsession.

Read more »

Wednesday, March 12

4:00pm

Friday, March 14

6:30pm

Under the Rainbow

Under the Rainbow

Agnès Jaoui | 2013 | 112 mins

New York Premiere!

The arrival of Prince Charming in a young woman’s life is complicated by a fork in the road guided by a very different but equally charming man in this contemporary fairy tale filled with twists and sharp humor. Fabulous and seamless editing.

Twenty-four-year-old Laura (Agathe Bonitzer) has faith that someday her Prince Charming will suddenly appear. But when such a man does turn up, so does another one—charming in a different way, but dark and alluring. In a flash, all of Laura’s assumptions about life and the future become conventional and wrong. Under the Rainbow is a contemporary fairy tale with more than its share of twists, imbued with the sharp existentialist humor we have come to expect from the duo of Agnès Jaoui and Jean-Pierre Bacri (The Taste of Others, Look at Me). Both once again collaborate on the script and co-star as Pierre and Marian, a comically neurotic middle-aged pair who, despite being a generation older than Laura, face a similar predicament: how to lead their lives in relation to their sometimes wild dreams and expectations.

Wednesday, March 12

9:00pm

Friday, March 14

3:45pm

Young & Beautiful

Young & Beautiful

François Ozon | 2013 | 95 mins

New York Premiere! Director François Ozon and actress Géraldine Pailhas in person!

Ozon’s latest tracks a pivotal year in the life of a 17-year-old, observing her journey without judgment and reflecting on the emotions and insecurities that define her entrance into adulthood.

Ozon is a master. “No one’s serious at 17,” wrote Arthur Rimbaud. For Isabelle (Marine Vacth), the 17-year-old at the center of François Ozon’s Young & Beautiful, this sentiment may justify the choices she makes over the course of a pivotal year. Divided into four seasons, Isabelle’s foray into prostitution is motivated not by a need for money or control, but rather by an overwhelming desire for self-discovery. Ozon observes her journey without judgment, reflecting on the emotions and insecurities that saturate a young person’s entrance into adulthood. One year removed from In the House (Rendez-Vous ’13), Ozon again proves a master at coaxing strong performances from young actors; Marine Vacth, in her first leading role, is a revelation. Nominated for two 2014 César Awards: Géraldine Pailhas (Best Supporting Actress) and Marine Vacth (Most Promising Actress). A Sundance Selects release.

Saturday, March 08

6:30pm

March 2, 2014 Posted by | CULTURE, FILM, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Holiday Guide – Go to the Whitney Museum now + see SARAH MICHELSON 1/24 – 2/2

Great Shows at the Whitney this Season, Drag Yourself, your date, your relatives!

Sarah Michelson


Whitney Museum of American Art
945 Madison Avenue at 75th Street
New York, NY 10021

General Information: (212) 570-3600
whitney.org


CHOREOGRAPHER AND BUCKSBAUM AWARD WINNER SARAH MICHELSON TO DEBUT HER LATEST WORK AT THE WHITNEY

Choreographer and Bucksbaum Award winner Sarah Michelson reclaims the Whitney’s fourth-floor Emily Fisher Landau Galleries this winter to premiere the culmination of her acclaimed Devotion series. The new work, 4, will be presented in an eight-performance engagement from January 24 through February 2, 2014. 4 was co-commissioned by the Whitney and the Walker Art Center.

Jay Sanders, the Whitney’s curator of performance, noted: “Sarah’s work combines the rigor, physicality, and conceptual thinking that define and develop new possibilities in contemporary choreography.” Writing in The New York Times about an earlier segment of Michelson’s Devotion series, Claudia La Rocco commented that “Ms. Michelson is known for her uncanny ability to take over a space.”

Sarah Michelson (b. 1964) is a New York–based, British-born choreographer. Her 2012 Whitney Biennial piece, Devotion Study #1—The American Dancer, commissioned by the Museum, employed a text written for the occasion at Michelson’s request by another Biennial artist, theater director/playwright Richard Maxwell, founder of New York City Players. Her new work will reunite her with Maxwell once again.

4 will be presented at the Whitney on January 24–26, 29–31, and February 1–2. All performances are at 2 pm. Tickets are $25 and go on sale to the public on Monday, December 16, at noon, via whitney.org. Tickets may also be purchased at the Museum during gallery hours (Wednesday–Sunday), starting December 18. Due to limited capacity, patrons are encouraged to purchase tickets in advance.


ABOUT THE BUCKSBAUM AWARD

Melva Bucksbaum, a Whitney trustee since 1996, launched the Bucksbaum Award in 2000. Prior to Michelson, the recipients of the award have included conceptual artist Michael Asher, whose Biennial project in 2010 involved keeping the Museum open around the clock for three consecutive days, Paul Pfeiffer (2000), Irit Batsry (2002), Raymond Pettibon (2004), Mark Bradford (2006), and Omer Fast (2008).

The Bucksbaum Award, created and produced by Tiffany & Co., is given every two years in recognition of an artist, chosen from those included in the Biennial, whose work demonstrates a singular combination of talent and imagination. The selected artist is considered by the jurors to have the potential to make a lasting impact on the history of American art, based on the excellence of past work as well as present work in the Biennial. In addition to receiving a $100,000 grant, each Bucksbaum laureate is invited to present an exhibition at the Whitney, sometime within the succeeding two years.

The jury for the 2012 Bucksbaum Award that selected Sarah Michelson to receive the award was comprised of Adam D. Weinberg, the Whitney’s Alice Pratt Brown Director; Donna De Salvo, Whitney Chief Curator and Deputy Director for Programs; the Biennial curators Elisabeth Sussman and Jay Sanders; and three guest panelists, Lia Gangitano, Branden Joseph, and Christophe Cherix.

Funding for the Bucksbaum Award is provided by an endowment from the Martin Bucksbaum Family Foundation.

The 2014 Whitney Biennial, goes on view at the Whitney from March 7 through May 25 with portions of the show continuing into June. The next Bucksbaum laureate will be named from among the 103 participants in the 2014 Biennial. Visit whitney.org for more information.


EXHIBITION SUPPORT

4 is co-commissioned by the Walker Art Center, with support provided by the William and Nadine McGuire Commissioning Fund and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

4 was made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

NEFA

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

New York City Department of Cultural Affairs

Generous support for 4 at the Whitney Museum of American Art is provided by an anonymous donor.

Funding for the Whitney’s Performance Program is provided by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, and the Performance Committee of the Whitney Museum of American Art.

New York State Council on the Arts

and Remarkable Exhibitions you must not miss:

Whitney Museum of American Art

Edward Steichen

December 4–17
This Friday, we’re thrilled to present an exhibition of works by the pioneering American photographer Edward Steichen. Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition features more than forty celebrity portraits and fashion photographs taken for Vanity Fair and Vogue, shots for advertising campaigns, and images that reflect the artist’s interest in the natural world.

And don’t miss masterworks by Arthur Dove, Joseph Stella, John Marin, and Gaston Lachaise on view in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe. The exhibition will feature a new rotation of artists on December 19.

We hope to see you at the Whitney!


EXHIBITIONS
PERFORMANCES
FAMILY PROGRAMS
SHOP
OTHER EVENTS
MEMBERSHIP


EXHIBITIONS
BACK TO TOP

ROBERT INDIANA: BEYOND LOVE
Through January 5
“Shockingly exciting . . . a revelation”—The New York Times

Robert Indiana

Emerging at the time of Pop art in the early 1960s, Robert Indiana embraced the vocabulary of commonplace highway signs and roadside entertainments. He used words to explore themes of American identity, racial injustice, and the illusion and disillusion of love. The appearance in 1966 of his signature image, LOVE, and its proliferation on unauthorized products, eclipsed the poignant complexity of his art. This retrospective reveals an artist whose work addresses fundamental issues facing humanity—love, death, sin, and forgiveness—giving new meaning to our understanding of the ambiguities of the American Dream and the plight of the individual in a pluralistic society.

RITUALS OF RENTED ISLAND: OBJECT THEATER, LOFT PERFORMANCE, AND THE NEW PSYCHODRAMA—MANHATTAN, 1970–1980
Through February 2
“An essential show”—The New York Observer

Sylvia Whitman

This exhibition illuminates a radical period of 1970s performance art that flourished in downtown Manhattan, or what filmmaker and performance artist Jack Smith called “Rented Island,” and still remains largely unknown today. Working in lofts, storefronts, and alternative spaces, this group of artists, with backgrounds in theater, dance, music, and visual art, created complex new forms of performance to embody and address contemporary media, commercial culture, and high art.

T. J. WILCOX: IN THE AIR
Through February 9
“Dazzling . . . an ode to New York and to film”—The New York Times

T. J. Wilcox

This exhibition presents a new panoramic film installation by T. J. Wilcox—a large, immersive cinematic environment whose circular screen harks back to the “cinema in-the-round” presentations of the early days of film. A spectacular birds’-eye view of New York, shot from the artist’s studio high above Union Square, is punctuated by six short films that tell New York–specific narratives related to a particular view from Wilcox’s windows. The exhibition also features works from the Museum’s collection selected by Wilcox, including a group of films in which artists reflect on the cityscape of New York over the last sixty years.

EDWARD STEICHEN IN THE 1920S AND 1930S:
A RECENT ACQUISITION

December 6–February 23

Edward Steichen

Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition presents an extraordinary gift of Edward Steichen photographs given to the Museum by Richard and Jackie Hollander. This exhibition includes celebrity portraits and fashion photographs taken during Steichen’s tenure as chief photographer for Condé Nast, shots for advertising campaigns, and images that reflect the artist’s interest in the natural world. Seen together, these works demonstrate Steichen’s role as a leading proponent of photography as both an aesthetic form and a vehicle for mass communication.

IN PARTS
Through February 23

Allen Ruppersberg

Artists frequently think beyond the unique object, choosing to work with a group of closely related images that together express an artistic vision in its entirety. This ongoing installation, drawn from the Museum’s extensive holding of works on paper, presents examples of this creative process. Works by Dotty Attie, Mark Bradford, Carroll Dunham, Dan Flavin, Jasper Johns, Elizabeth Murray, Lorna Simpson, Joyce Trieman, and Terry Winters, among other artists, will be shown in rotation.

AMERICAN LEGENDS:
FROM CALDER TO O’KEEFFE

Ongoing
“One of [the Whitney’s] best in years”—The New York Times

Stuart Davis

American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe showcases the Whitney’s deep holdings of artwork from the first half of the twentieth century by artists including Oscar Bluemner, Charles Burchfield, Alexander Calder, Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Gaston Lachaise, Jacob Lawrence, John Marin, Elie Nadelman, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Joseph Stella. One- and two-artist presentations provide a survey of each artist’s work across a range of media.


PERFORMANCES
BACK TO TOP

THE CHAIRS: PUPPETRY PERFORMANCE
AND DEMONSTRATION WITH
THEODORA SKIPITARES

Friday, December 13
7 pm

Theodora Skipitares

On the occasion of Rituals of Rented Island, artist Theodora Skipitares will lead an evening of performance and demonstration around her practice of puppet theater. Skipitares along with Judith Malina, Jan Leslie Harding, and other guests will re-imagine Eugene Ionesco’s absurdist classic The Chairs as a puppet theater piece, interspersing live vignettes of performance with interactive demonstrations. Moving in and out of the performance space, Skipitares will combine her artistic and teaching practices to discuss the unique properties of puppetry.

This event is free with Museum admission, which is pay-what-you-wish on Fridays, 6–9 pm. There are no special tickets or reservations.


FAMILY PROGRAMS
BACK TO TOP

ROBERT INDIANA OPEN STUDIO:
THE MOTHER OF US ALL

Saturday, December 7
2–4 pm

Robert Indiana

In 1966, Robert Indiana designed the costumes for a production of the opera The Mother of Us All. During this month’s Open Studio, families will explore Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE and create their own theatrical characters.

Free with Museum admission. No registration is required.


SHOP
BACK TO TOP

EDWARD STEICHEN:
LIVES IN PHOTOGRAPHY

$60 / $54 for members

Edward Steichen: Lives in Photography

This volume traces Steichen’s career trajectory from his Pictoralist beginnings to his time with Condé Nast through his directorship of photography at the Museum of Modern Art. The book features hundreds of his photographs reproduced in stunning four-color, as well as essays from a range of scholars exploring his most important subjects and legacy.


OTHER EVENTS
BACK TO TOP

BAMCINÉMATEK PRESENTS
MIGRATING FORMS

December 11–17
BAMcinématek
30 Lafayette Avenue
Brooklyn, NY

Migrating Forms

This festival of the most audacious moving-image work from the film and art worlds—which boasts “the highest revelation-per-event ratios of any festival in New York” (Film Comment)—features Ryan Trecartin, Lutz Bacher, Xavier Cha, and more.

For more information, visit BAM.org/MigratingForms.


MEMBERSHIP
BACK TO TOP

Whitney Gift Membership

This holiday season surprise someone with a Whitney gift membership! Gift memberships last a full year and make a great gift for any occasion.

Curate Your Own gift memberships start at just $85 and will allow your gift recipient to custom design a membership experience from five amazing Series of exclusive member privileges. Members enjoy unlimited express admission, special discounts, and exclusive invitations to Morning Viewing Hours, Preview Days, and Member Saturday Nights. And this March, members will be among the first to see the 2014 Biennial.

Gift memberships are available over the phone at (212) 570-3641, online, or in the Museum Lobby.

JOIN TODAY OR
GIVE THE GIFT OF MEMBERSHIP

For further information, please email memberinfo@whitney.org or call (212) 570-3641. Thank you for supporting the Whitney!

Membership

Image Credits

Edward Steichen (1879–1973), Marlene Dietrich, 1931. Gelatin silver print, sheet: 10 × 8 in. (25.4 × 20.3 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Richard and Jackie Hollander in memory of Ellyn Hollander 2012.234. Steichen/Vanity Fair; © Condé Nast

Robert Indiana (b. 1928), LOVE, 1966. Oil on canvas. Indianapolis Museum of Art. © 2013 Morgan Art Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Sylvia Palacios Whitman (b. 1941), Passing Through, performance at Sonnabend Gallery, New York, May 20, 1977. Courtesy the artist. Photograph by Babette Mangolte; © 1977 All reproduction rights reserved

Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013-February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

Edward Steichen (1879 1973), Ad for Coty Lipstick, c. 1930. Gelatin silver print, sheet: 9 15/16 × 7 15/16in. (25.2 × 20.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Richard and Jackie Hollander in memory of Ellyn Hollander 2012.205. © Permission of the Estate of Edward Steichen

Allen Ruppersberg (b. 1944), (Who’s afraid of the new now?), 1988, from the series Preview. Lithograph: sheet, 22 1/8 × 13 13/16 in. (56.2 × 35.1 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Print Committee 2011.95j. © Allen Ruppersberg. Digital Image © Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

Stuart Davis (1894–1964), Owh! in San Paõ, 1951. Oil on canvas, 52 1/4 × 41 3/4 in. (132.7 × 106 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 52.2. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Theodora Skipitares, Skysaver, performance at Galerie ak, Frankfurt, November 8–16, 1980. Courtesy the artist. Photograph by Christian Hanussek

Robert Indiana (b. 1928), The Sweet Mystery, 1959-60. Oil on canvas, 72 × 60 in. Private collection. © 2013 Morgan Art Foundation, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Film still courtesy Ed Atkins


Whitney Museum
of American Art

whitney.org

December 6, 2013 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

FILM – We Recommend The Films of Aleksei Balabanov 12/3-10 BAM

This is a major major major talent on display in this series.

We highly recommend

Film Series

Of Freaks and Men: The Films of Aleksei Balabanov

Dec 3—Dec 10, 2013

Arguably the most radical, defiantly uncompromising Russian director to emerge since the collapse of communism in that region, Aleksei Balabanov, who died suddenly this year at age 54, captured the Wild West atmosphere of the post-Soviet era in movies that oozed with caustic irony, macabre humor, and outré violence. Moving between offbeat experimental works and more mainstream, but equally personal, genre films, Balabanov—already a cult sensation in Russia—is ripe for discovery. All films directed by Aleksei Balabanov.

TransCultural Express: Russian and American Arts Today is proudly co-presented in partnership with the Mikhail Prokhorov Fund

Film
Happy Days
Tue, Dec 3, 2013

Shot in grainy, expressive black and white, Balabanov’s striking narrative debut is a freewheeling, disorienting head-trip adaptation of Samuel Beckett’s absurdist stage work.

MORE  buy

Film
The Castle
Tue, Dec 3, 2013

Balabanov’s second feature—a characteristically eccentric take on Kafka’s absurdist novel—is a swirl of surrealistic imagery with a score by the pioneering experimental cult musician Sergey Kuryokhin.

MORE  buy

Film
Of Freaks and Men
Dec 4—Dec 5, 2013

Balabanov’s perverse and fascinating black comedy concerns a pair of sinister pornographers who overturn the lives of two families in early-1900s St. Petersburg.

MORE  buy

Film
Morphia
Thu, Dec 5, 2013

A young doctor succumbs to a crippling morphine addiction during the Bolshevik Revolution in this bleak, savagely funny vision of societal decay based on a collection of Bulgakov short stories.

MORE  buy

Film
Dead Man’s Bluff
Fri, Dec 6, 2013

Balabanov reportedly spilled fifty liters of fake blood for this Tarantino-esque action joyride about two hoodlum brothers who scramble to recover a suitcase full of heroin.

MORE  buy

Film
Cargo 200
Fri, Dec 6, 2013

Like The Texas Chain Saw Massacre transposed to 1984 USSR, Balabanov’s prize-winning ultra-nightmare—based on a shocking true crime incident—is a grim, sickly funny horror-show commentary on the Soviet era.

MORE  buy

Film
Brother
Sat, Dec 7, 2013

Balabanov’s “terrifically stylish” (The New York Times)  breakout commercial hit—about a young man who gets sucked into St. Petersburg’s criminal underworld—captures post-Soviet Russian youth in grimy detail.

MORE  buy

Film
Brother 2
Sat, Dec 7, 2013

Balabanov cranked the action up to 11 for this bathed-in-blood sequel to his mega hit, in which baby-faced hit man Danila heads to Chicago to avenge the death of an old army buddy.

MORE buy

Film
The River
Dec 8—Dec 9, 2013

Balabanov’s fascinating, fragmented blend of fiction and ethnography is a haunting, almost folkloric tale of passion and betrayal set in a remote Siberian leper colony

MORE   buy

Film
Me Too
Sun, Dec 8, 2013

Tarkovsky meets Kaurismäki in this deadpan riff on the revered filmmaker’s sci-fi film Stalker. A ragtag gaggle of thugs, punk rockers, and societal outcasts embark on a pilgrimage in search of enlightenment.

MORE    buy

Film
The Stoker
Sun, Dec 8, 2013

Balabanov’s blackest of black comedies—about a St. Petersburg furnace tender who quietly looks the other way as mobsters deliver corpses to him for incineration—is unsettlingly hilarious.

MORE   buy

Film
It Doesn’t Hurt Me
Tue, Dec 10, 2013

Balabanov took a surprising detour into romantic drama with this poignant, offbeat character study about a young entrepreneur and an eccentric woman dying of leukemia.

MORE   buy

Film
War
Tue, Dec 10, 2013

This gritty and gripping action drama set during the Second Chechen War has the structure and tension of a classical Western, following a doomed mission to rescue hostages from enemy territory.

MORE buy

Photo: courtesy Intermedia Agency

December 3, 2013 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, FILM, LIFESTYLES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

TODAY AND TOMORROW! Q & A with the Director! We Recommend NORDIC NOIR at BAM : The Films Of Kjell Sundvall

We highly recommend this film series with famed filmmaker Kjell Sundvall, who will attend each performance for an intro or Q&A.

Fans of DAY OF THE JACKAL should NOT miss THE LAST CONTRACT, screening Nov 1 at 7pm. A nerve-wracking, tense, foreboding thriller packed with excellent performances and gripping direction.

Film Series

Nordic Noir: Kjell Sundvall

Nov 1—Nov 2, 2013

Fans of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Henning Mankell, and other popular Swedish crime fiction should not miss this retrospective of director Kjell Sundvall, one of Sweden’s most critically and commercially successful directors. His crime thriller The Hunters was a landmark of Swedish cinema and, since then, he’s produced some of the most gripping examples of Nordic noir made in the last two decades. All films directed by Kjell Sundvall.

The Last Contract

Curator’s Choice
Fri, Nov 1, 2013
  • 7PM
LOCATION:
Peter Jay Sharp Building
BAM Rose Cinemas
RUN TIME: 107min
FORMAT: 35mm
GENERAL ADMISSION: $13
BAM CINEMA CLUB MEMBERS: $8 (Free for members at the Movie Buff II level and above. RSVP required.)
+  Q&A with Kjell Sundvall

Buy Tickets

Directed by Kjell Sundvall | 1998
With Mikael Persbrandt, Michael Kitchen
“…tense, gripping, paranoid thriller.”
—The Guardian

This fictionalized account of the unsolved 1986 assassination of progressive Swedish prime minister Olof Palme posits that his murder was the work of an elaborate right-wing political machine—and even implicates the CIA in the plot. Featuring a chilling performance by Michael Kitchen as the ice-cold hitman.

In Swedish with English subtitles

In Bed with Santa

Fri, Nov 1, 2013
  • 9:45PM
LOCATION:
Peter Jay Sharp Building
BAM Rose Cinemas
RUN TIME: 98min
RATED: NR
FORMAT: 35mm
GENERAL ADMISSION: $13
BAM CINEMA CLUB MEMBERS: $8 (Movie Moguls free)
STUDENTS/SENIORS:  $9 (29 and under with a valid ID, Mon—Thu)
+  Intro by Kjell Sundvall

Buy Tickets

Directed by Kjell Sundvall | 1999
With Katarina Ewerlof, Peter Haber, Jessica Zanden, Leif Andree, Nina Gunke
“A very funny black comedy…offbeat and un-p.c.”
—Variety

Sundvall took a time out from directing thrillers to helm this demented Yuletide farce. It’s Christmas Eve and Sara (Ewerlöf) has invited her three ex-husbands and their families over for a little holiday get-together—much to her current husband’s chagrin. Soon enough, the booze kicks in, the conversation turns to sex, Sara drops a bombshell, and all hell breaks loose.

In Swedish with English subtitles

The Hunters (Jägarna)

Sat, Nov 2, 2013
  • 4PM
LOCATION:
Peter Jay Sharp Building
BAM Rose Cinemas
RUN TIME: 118min
FORMAT: 35mm
GENERAL ADMISSION: $13
BAM CINEMA CLUB MEMBERS: $8 (Movie Moguls free)
STUDENTS/SENIORS:  $9 (29 and under with a valid ID, Mon—Thu)
+  Intro by Kjell Sundvall

Buy Tickets

Directed by Kjell Sundvall | 1996
With Rolf Lassgård, Lennart Jähkel, Jarmo Mäkinen, Tomas Norström, Thomas Hedengran

After Stockholm cop Erik (Lassgård, best known as the original Kurt Wallander) kills a man in the line of duty, he’s transferred north to his small hometown. But when his investigation into the mysterious slaughter of reindeer is met with resistance from the locals, he must forge ahead alone—and come to grips with some ugly truths about those closest to him. One of the highest-grossing Swedish films ever, The Hunters established Sundvall as a master of the thriller genre.

In Swedish with English subtitles

False Trail (Jägarna 2)

Sat, Nov 2, 2013
  • 7:30PM
LOCATION:
Peter Jay Sharp Building
BAM Rose Cinemas
RUN TIME: 129min
FORMAT: 35mm
GENERAL ADMISSION: $13
BAM CINEMA CLUB MEMBERS: $8 (Movie Moguls free)
STUDENTS/SENIORS:  $9 (29 and under with a valid ID, Mon—Thu)
+  Q&A with Kjell Sundvall, moderated by film critic David D’Arcy

Buy Tickets

Directed by Kjell Sundvall | 2011
With Rolf Lassgård, Peter Stormare, Kim Tjernström, Annika Nordin, Lo Kauppi
“The real deal when it comes to Nordic noir.”
—Time Out London

In this sequel to The Hunters, ex-cop Erik Bäckström (Lassgård) is once again summoned to the small town of Norrland, this time to investigate the disappearance of a woman. Facing pushback from the local sheriff (Fargo’s Stormare, marvelously menacing), he starts to unearth unsettling secrets about the town and its people. Tense, richly emotional, and effectively disturbing, “this is the real deal when it comes to Nordic noir” (Time Out London).

In Swedish with English subtitles

November 1, 2013 Posted by | CULTURE, FILM, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

   

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