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FILM/FESTIVALS — New York Asian Film Festival Returns 6/30 -7/16/17 *NYC

FSLC and Subway Cinema announce New York Asian Film Festival, June 30 – July 16

 

 

Jane © House in Seoul All Rights Reserved Courtesy of M-Line Distribution

The Film Society of Lincoln Center and Subway Cinema announced the complete lineup for the 16th New York Asian Film Festival (NYAFF), which will take place from June 30 to July 13 at the Film Society and July 14 to 16 at the SVA Theatre. North America’s leading festival of popular Asian cinema will showcase 56 feature films, including 3 International Premieres, 21 North American Premieres, 4 U.S. Premieres, and 15 films making their New York City debuts. The festival will feature in-person appearances by more than 20 international filmmakers and celebrity guests from mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, and Southeast Asia.

Birdshot_1

This year, all three of NYAFF’s Gala screenings are brilliant reinventions of the thriller genre. The Opening Gala will be the International Premiere of Nattawut Poonpiriya’s Bad Genius, the first Southeast Asian film to open the festival, with the director and stars in attendance. In this exhilarating high-school thriller, straight-A students Lynn (Chutimon Chuengcharoensukying) and Bank (Chanon Santinatornkul) stage a heist that will undermine the U.S. university entrance system after they lose their own scholarships. The Centerpiece Gala of the festival will be the North American Premiere of Mikhail Red’s Birdshot, a continuation of the festival programmers’ efforts to champion films from Southeast Asia, and the Philippines in particular. The Closing Gala is the U.S. Premiere of Jung Byung-gil’s The Villainess, fresh from its Midnight screening in Cannes. The adrenaline-soaked action film stars Kim Ok-vin as a ruthless female assassin trained in China who starts a new life with South Korea’s Intelligence Agency.

Bamseom Pirates Seoul Inferno © OPOT Pictures; Courtesy of M-Line Distribution

New to NYAFF in 2017 is the Main Competition section, featuring seven diverse works by first or second-time directors that are all having their North American premieres at the festival. Competing are Bad Genius (Thailand), Birdshot (Philippines), A Double Life (Japan), The Gangster’s Daughter (Taiwan), Kfc (Vietnam), Jane (South Korea), and With Prisoners (Hong Kong). The competition jury will be announced at a later date, with winners revealed on the festival’s final night at Film Society of Lincoln Center on July 13.

Mad World

“We were seeking a range of original films from first-time directors, films that represent the diversity of filmmaking from Asia, stories that say something both very local and specific to their countries of origin and something very universal: we hope we achieved at least some of this with our inaugural competition selection, which includes films from seven countries/cities in the region in a broad variety of genres,” NYAFF executive director Samuel Jamier said. “It’s important for us to champion new filmmaking from Asia, and the diversity of film made there at a time when other festivals in North America seem to be reducing the size of their Asian lineups.”

Vanishing Time © Showbox

More now than ever, Hong Kong cinema is at the core of the festival’s programming: faithful to its Chinatown origins, this year’s edition celebrates the best filmmaking from the Special Administrative Region with a central Hong Kong Panorama section, commemorating the 20th anniversary of its establishment, with major support from the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office in New York. Over the past two decades, Hong Kong cinema has continuously influenced and inspired many filmmakers in Asia and in the world. This year’s lineup proves the originality and excellence of its production is intact: from a powerful condemnation of life inside the territory’s juvenile detention centers (With Prisoners), to a tale of corruption and redemption set in the underbelly of 1960s Hong Kong (Dealer/Healer), the films bear testimony to the city’s rich cinema history.

Dealer Healer © Sil-Metropole Organisation

The core of the panorama will be a special (and first of its kind) focus on the exciting new generation of directors, titled Young Blood Hong Kong. As part of the 20th anniversary, the festival is looking to the future of Hong Kong cinema, rather than its past: these recent Hong Kong directors are working in various genres, tackling a range of social issues, and paying homage to the film traditions they grew up with, from tenement dramas to vampire comedies. Meanwhile, NYAFF continues to bring established, major filmmakers from the region: Lawrence Lau, who, along with Ann Hui, is one of Hong Kong’s best neorealist directors, will be introducing his star-studded crime action drama Dealer/Healer; the Panorama will spotlight the new generation from the region with guest filmmaker Wong Chun and screenwriter Florence Chan with Mad World, Derek Hui with This Is Not What I Expected, and Alan Lo with Zombiology: Enjoy Yourself Tonight. Other films by first-time Hong Kong directors in this year’s lineup are Derek Tsang’s Soul Mate, Yan Pak-wing and Chiu Sin-hang’s Vampire Cleanup Department, and Andrew Wong’s With Prisoners.

Extraordinary Mission 4

The 2017 lineup also includes five LGBTQ-themed films: two dramas with transsexual protagonists, Naoko Ogigami’s Close-Knit from Japan, and Cho Hyun-hoon’s drama Jane from South Korea; two coming-of-age high-school youth dramas, Ahn Jung-min’s Fantasy of the Girls from South Korea, and Leste Chen’s 2006 Eternal Summer from Taiwan, which merits a second look a decade on; and Lee Sang-il’s wild and violent mystery thriller Rage, featuring Go Ayano (NYAFF 2016 Rising Star Asia awardee) as a homeless stranger invited into the home of a semi-closeted salaryman (Satoshi Tsumabuki) as his live-in-lover.

The Villainess - Courtesy of Well Go USA

Another highlight of this year’s festival are three films that celebrate Japan’s unique “Roman Porno” genre, each having their North American premieres: Aroused by Gymnopedies, Dawn of the Felines, and Wet Woman in the Wind. Nikkatsu, Japan’s oldest film studio, is celebrating 45 years since they birthed the softcore Roman Porno genre (roman derives from the French word for novel). Invented to save a dying industry, they gave carte blanche to directors with minimal rules: keep it under 80 minutes with a sex scene every ten. This allowed for wild stream of consciousness works of both the highest and lowest caliber. Now, Nikkatsu has enlisted top contemporary talent for the Roman Porno Reboot Project, with these three filmmakers taking the provocative, envelope-pushing format to a whole new level.

Bad Genius © GDH 559

In addition to the festival’s screenings, the NYAFF awards a number of honorees each year, including this year’s recipients:

  • The 2017 NYAFF Lifetime Achievement Award goes to veteran Hong Kong actor Tony Leung Ka-fai, who will attend a three-film tribute, including Johnnie To’s Election, Longman Leung & Sunny Luk’s Cold War 2 and Tsui’s Hark’s The Taking of Tiger Mountain 3D. In a career spanning 35 years, Leung has worked with the iconic directors Li Han-hsiang, Wong Kar-wai, Stanley Kwan, and Jean-Jacques Annaud, and starred opposite the screen legends Jackie Chan, Leslie Cheung, Maggie Cheung, Andy Lau, Jet Li, and Fan Bingbing. Leung was arguably the first Hong Kong star to become an international heartthrob, in Jean-Jacques Annaud’s The Lover.
  • Our Star Asia Award recipient is Korean movie star Gang Dong-won, whose charisma and emotional investment in his performances gives his films a unique edge. His most iconic films include Lee Myung-se’s Duelist, Park Jin-pyo’s Voice of a Murderer, and Jang Hoon’s Secret Reunion. Last year, NYAFF presented two of his films, The Priests and A Violent Prosecutor, and in 2017, the festival will be joined by Gang to present a special screening of the magical fable Vanishing Time: A Boy Who Returned.

A Quiet Dream ©

  • The Screen International Rising Star Asia Award will be given to Thailand’s Chutimon “Aokbab” Chuengcharoensukying. The 21-year-old model, who is still a student at Bangkok’s Chulalongkorn University, found fame last year in Thank You for Sharing, an eight-minute, viral short about cyber-bullying. The NYAFF is opening with her feature debut, Bad Genius, in which she stars as a high-school student who masterminds an ambitious heist of the American university entrance exam system. It’s a demanding role, in which her quick-witted character must navigate a complex moral universe where parents and teachers don’t always know best.

Tickets go on sale June 15, with Film Society and Subway Cinema members receiving an early access period beginning June 13. Tickets are $14; $11 for students and seniors (62+); and $9 for Film Society members. See more and save with a 3+ film discount package and All Access Pass. Learn more at filmlinc.org.

Credits:
Curated by executive director Samuel Jamier, deputy director Stephen Cremin, and programmers Claire Marty and David Wilentz.

The New York Asian Film Festival is co-presented by Subway Cinema and the Film Society of Lincoln Center and takes place from June 30 to July 13 at Film Society’s Walter Reade Theater (165 West 65th St), and July 14 to 16 at SVA Theatre (333 West 23rd St).

Keep up to date with information at www.filmlinc.org and www.subwaycinema.com.  Subway Cinema can be followed on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nyaff and Twitter at www.twitter.com/subwaycinema.

FULL LINEUP (57):
Titles in bold are included in the Main Competition

CHINA (6):
Co-presented with Confucius Institute Headquarters and China Institute
 Battle of Memories (Leste Chen, 2017)
 Blood of Youth (Yang Shupeng, 2016)
 Duckweed (Han Han, 2017)
 Extraordinary Mission (Alan Mak & Anthony Pun, 2017)
 Someone to Talk to (Liu Yulin, 2016)
 Soul on a String (Zhang Yang, 2016)

HONG KONG PANORAMA (10):
Presented with the support of Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office in New York
 Cold War 2 (Longman Leung, Sunny Luk, 2016)
 Dealer/Healer (Lawrence Lau, 2017)
 Election (Johnnie To, 2005)
 Mad World (Wong Chun, 2016)
 Soul Mate (Derek Tsang, 2016)
 The Taking of Tiger Mountain (Tsui Hark, 2014)
 This Is Not What I Expected (Derek Hui, 2017)
 Vampire Cleanup Department (Yan Pak-wing, Chiu Sin-hang, 2017)
 With Prisoners (Andrew Wong, 2017)
 Zombiology: Enjoy Yourself Tonight (Alan Lo, 2017)

JAPAN (15):
 Aroused by Gymnopedies (Isao Yukisada, 2016)
 Close-Knit (Naoko Ogigami, 2017)
 Dawn of the Felines (Kazuya Shiraishi, 2016)
 Destruction Babies (Tetsuya Mariko, 2016)
 A Double Life (Yoshiyuki Kishi, 2016)
 Happiness (Sabu, 2016)
 Japanese Girls Never Die (Daigo Matsui, 2016)
 The Long Excuse (Miwa Nishikawa, 2016)
 Love and Other Cults (Eiji Uchida, 2017)
 The Mole Song: Hong Kong Capriccio (Takashi Miike, 2016)
 Rage (Lee Sang-il, 2016)
 Suffering of Ninko (Norihiro Niwatsukino, 2016)
 Survival Family (Shinobu Yaguchi, 2017)
 Traces of Sin (Kei Ishikawa, 2016)
 Wet Woman in the Wind (Akihiro Shiota, 2016)

SOUTH KOREA (11):
Presented with the support of Korean Cultural Center New York
 Fabricated City (Park Kwang-hyun, 2017)
 Fantasy of the Girls (Ahn Jung-min, 2016)
 Jane (Cho Hyun-hoon, 2016)
 Ordinary Person (Kim Bong-han, 2017)
 A Quiet Dream (Zhang Lu, 2016)
 A Single Rider (Lee Joo-young, 2017)
 Split (Choi Kook-hee, 2016)
 The Tooth and the Nail (Jung Sik, Kim Whee, 2017)
 The Truth Beneath (Lee Kyoung-mi, 2016)
 Vanishing Time: A Boy Who Returned (Uhm Tae-hwa, 2016)
 The Villainess (Jung Byung-gil, 2017)

SOUTHEAST ASIA (6)
 Bad Genius (Nattawut Poonpiriya, Thailand, 2017)
 Birdshot (Mikhail Red, Philippines, 2016)
 Kfc (Le Binh Giang, Vietnam, 2017)
 Mrs. K (Ho Yuhang, Malaysia, 2016)
 Saving Sally (Avid Liongoren, Philippines, 2016)
 Town in a Lake (Jet Leyco, Philippines, 2015)

TAIWAN (6):
Presented with the support of the Taipei Cultural Center of TECO in New York
 Eternal Summer (Leste Chen, 2006)
 The Gangster’s Daughter (Chen Mei-juin, 2017)
 Godspeed (Chung Mong-hong, 2016)
 Mon Mon Mon Monsters (Giddens, 2017)
 The Road to Mandalay (Midi Z, 2016)
 The Village of No Return (Chen Yu-hsun, 2017)

DOCUMENTARIES (2)
 Bamseom Pirates Seoul Inferno (Jung Yoon-suk, 2017)
 Mrs. B., A North Korean Woman (Jero Yun, 2016)

NYAFF TEASER:
https://youtu.be/Hw-mCSel3N4

OFFICIAL POSTER:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B–YOkNIV_ZhTjdqNjRVMm9IU00/view?ts=5931c144

 

NEW YORK ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL (NYAFF)
Now in its 16th year, the New York Asian Film Festival (NYAFF) is North America’s leading festival of popular Asian cinema, which The Village Voice has called “the best film festival in New York,” and The New York Times has called “one of the city’s most valuable events.” Launched in 2002 by Subway Cinema, the festival selects only the best, strangest, and most entertaining movies to screen for New York audiences, ranging from mainstream blockbusters and art-house eccentricities to genre and cult classics. It was the first North American film festival to champion the works of Johnnie To, Bong Joon-ho, Park Chan-wook, Takashi Miike, and other auteurs of contemporary Asian cinema. Since 2010, it has been produced in collaboration with the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Comment, the U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from The New York Times, Shutterstock, Variety, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. American Airlines is the Official Airline of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. For more information, visit www.filmlinc.org and follow @filmlinc on Twitter.

ABOUT SUBWAY CINEMA
Subway Cinema is America’s leading 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to the exhibition and appreciation of Asian popular film culture in all forms, building bridges between Asia and the West. With year-round festivals and programs, the organization aims to bring wide audience and critical attention to contemporary and classic Asian cinema in the U.S. In 2002, Subway Cinema launched its flagship event, the annual New York Asian Film Festival (NYAFF), which is North America’s leading festival of popular Asian cinema. Subway cinema’s other events and initiatives include Old School Kung Fu Fest (OSKFF).

For more information, visit www.subwaycinema.com, www.facebook.com/NYAFF, and follow @subwaycinema on Twitter (#nyaff16).

Subway Cinema receives generous, year-round support from the Kenneth A. Cowin Foundation and sponsorships from the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office in New York, Korean Cultural Center New York, Taipei Cultural Center of TECO in New York, China Institute, Manhattan Portage, Tsingtao Beer, Japan Foundation New York, Maven Wine, Bruce R. Watts, and thanks their media partners: Screen International, Asian Crush, China Film Insider, Chopsticks NY

June 22, 2017 Posted by | ART, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Film/Festivals – JAPAN CUTS: Festival of New Japanese Film July 13-23, 2017, at Japan Society *nyc

North America’s Largest Festival of New Japanese Cinema Announces First Confirmed

Highlights for 11th Annual Installment + ‘CUT ABOVE’ Awardee

JAPAN CUTS: Festival of New Japanese Film


July 13-23, 2017, at Japan Society

Poster art (l-r) for Over the Fence, ANTI-PORNO and Neko Atsume House, part of the 2017 JAPAN CUTS festival.

Presenting titles never before seen in New York and many screening for the first time in North America or even outside Japan, JAPAN CUTS: Festival of New Japanese Film presents the best new movies made in and around Japan and the filmmakers and performers who made them.

 

 

Set for July 13 to 23, the 2017 JAPAN CUTS festival will feature an exclusive premiere roster of nearly 30 films, ranging from big budget blockbusters to powerful shoestring indies, and includes spotlights on documentary cinema, experimental films, shorts and recent restorations of classic Japanese favorites. With the full schedule to be announced in early June, highlights confirmed to date include:

Over the Fence – East Coast Premiere: Critically-acclaimed drama by popular indie director Nobuhiro Yamashita (Linda Linda Linda), starring featured festival guest Joe Odagiri.

ANTI-PORNO – East Coast Premiere: Festival favorite Sion Sono’s subversive take on the Roman Porno genre, commissioned by famed Nikkatsu movie studio.

Neko Atsume House – North American Premiere: Family-friendly comedic drama adapted from Japan’s internationally beloved cat collecting app.

Daguerrotype – New York Premiere: Celebrated director Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s first French-language film, a Gothic horror fantasy with an all-European cast.

Resistance at Tule Lake: East Coast Premiere: Resonant documentary about incarcerated Japanese-Americans standing up for justice during WWII.

Also this year, the festival will award the 2017 CUT ABOVE Award for Outstanding Performance in Film to Joe Odagiri—a matinee idol, fashion icon and bone fide power brand in Japan, whose immense talent and diverse roles have been blazing Japanese screens for nearly two decades.

“Joe Odagiri is just one of many special guests who will attend this year among celebrated established filmmakers and some equally remarkable breakout talents,” says Aiko Masubuchi, Senior Film Programmer at Japan Society. “Following current trends in the industry, this year we’ll also focus on work that breaks the boundaries of social mores, national borders, and formal constraints through radical cultural phenomena, international co-productions, and avant-garde pieces expanding our definition of what Japanese cinema means today.”

In the run-up to this year’s festival, the JAPAN CUTS programming team served as jury of the 2017 Osaka Asian Film Festival’s Indie Forum section, awarding the 2nd annual JAPAN CUTS Award to Love and Goodbye and Hawaii directed by Shingo Matsumura on March 11, 2017. Additionally, the first JAPAN CUTS Audience Award winner Flying Colors from the festival’s 2016 10-year anniversary edition receives an encore screening on Friday, June 2, 7:00 pm as a “JAPAN CUTS Classic” in Japan Society Monthly Classics programming.

Emphasizing the diversity and vitality of one of the most exciting world cinemas, JAPAN CUTS gives cinephiles their first (and sometimes only) chance to discover the next waves of filmmaking from Japan. Founded in 2007, the festival presents the biggest Japanese blockbusters, raucous genre flicks, peerless independents, arthouse gems, radical documentaries and avant-garde forms, along with unique collaborative programs, workshops and panels put together with the cooperation of other international organizations. Special guest actors and filmmakers join the festivities for Q&As, award ceremonies, and the wild themed parties and receptions audiences have come to expect, with live music, food and libations.

Through its Film Program, Japan Society has introduced Japanese cinema to New York’s international audiences since the 1970s, presenting works by the era’s then new giants Shohei Imamura, Seijun Suzuki, and Hiroshi Teshigahara and others upon their first release, and groundbreaking retrospectives on now-canonical figures such as Kenji Mizoguchi and Yasujiro Ozu. Special guests such as Akira Kurosawa, Machiko Kyo, Toshiro Mifune, Robert De Niro, Francis Ford Coppola, and Hideko Takamine had already been part of Japan Society’s events before JAPAN CUTS launched.

Since JAPAN CUTS’ inception, the festival has attracted nearly 50,000 filmgoers and presented over 275 feature films, many never-before seen in the U.S. The first annual JAPAN CUTS was one of the most successful single events in the Society’s 2007-08 centennial celebration. The festival has premiered several films that have gone on to garner international acclaim, including: 0.5mm, 100 Yen Love, About Her Brother, Buy a Suit, Confessions, Death Note, Fish Story, Kamome Diner, Love Exposure, Milocrorze: A Love Story, The Mourning Forest, Ninja Kids!!!, Sawako Decides, Sukiyaki Western Django, Sway, Sketches of Kaitan City, The Tale of Iya, and United Red Army.

The Japan Society Film Program offers a diverse selection of Japanese films, from classics to contemporary independent productions, including retrospectives, thematic repertory film series, and U.S. premiere screenings. Its aim is to entertain, educate, and support activities in the Society’s arts and culture programs. More at www.japansociety.org/programs/film.

Founded in 1907, Japan Society is a multidisciplinary hub for global leaders, artists, scholars, educators, and English and Japanese-speaking audiences. At the Society, more than 100 events each year feature sophisticated, topically relevant presentations of Japanese art and culture and open, critical dialogue on issues of vital importance to the U.S., Japan and East Asia. An American nonprofit, nonpolitical organization, the Society cultivates a constructive, resonant and dynamic relationship between the people of the U.S. and Japan.

Japan Society is located at 333 East 47th Street between First and Second avenues (accessible by the 4/5/6 and 7 subway at Grand Central or the E and M subway at Lexington Avenue). For more information, call 212-832-1155 or visit www.japansociety.org.

June 2, 2017 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Film/OPPORTUNITY — REEL SISTERS OF THE DIASPORA 2017 Submissions OPEN

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African Voices Communications, Inc.

presents

REEL SISTERS BANNER large

May 2017

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EARLY BIRDS SUBMIT YOUR FILM to REEL SISTERS!

Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival & Lecture Series is seeking films and web series directed, written or produced by women of color. Shorts, features, animation, works-in-progress, narratives, documentaries and experimental works are eligible. Filmmakers will have their original works viewed at the 20th Annual Reel Sisters Film Festival from October 21-22, 2017 at AMC’s Magic Johnson Theater in Harlem and Alamo Drafthouse Cinema in Brooklyn!

Submission information is available at visit Reel Sisters. Submit films on Film Freeway.

For information call : (347) 534-3304 or (212) 865-2982.

Entries must be submitted electronically on Film Freeway. Entry fee is $20 (Early Bird Deadline: May 5, 2017) or $25 (Deadline: MAY 31, 2017).

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May 30, 2017 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

Dance/ Music/ Film/ Events — We Recommend BAM Dance Africa May 2017 *bklyn May 20-29, 2017

Make sure you attend the FREE outdoor Bazaar on the weekend!

DanceAfrica 2017 Bazaar

Dance Africa 2017, Bazaar

Rain or Shine!
May 27—May 29, 2017
Performance dates & times
LOCATION:

Ashland Pl / Lafayette Ave

Hours subject to change. Rain or shine.
Free
Saturday May 27, 2017

12pm

BACK

DanceAfrica’s beloved bazaar returns, featuring more than 150 vendors from around the world, offering African, Caribbean, and African-American food, crafts, and fashion. Celebrate the rich and diverse cultural heritage of Africa and its diaspora—and see the streets surrounding BAM transformed into a global marketplace.

Bazaar Hours

Sat, May 27, 12—10pm
Sun, May 28, 12—8pm
Mon, May 29, 12—8pm

(Hours subject to change. Rain or shine.)

<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/9577279/17-MKTING-0605-NEW-DanceAfrica2017-640×359.jpg” alt=”DanceAfrica 2017 ” />DanceAfrica 2017
Dance
DanceAfrica 2017

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DanceAfrica 2017
May 26—May 29, 2017

Performance dates & times
LOCATION:
Peter Jay Sharp Building

BAM Howard Gilman Opera House
RUN TIME: Approx 2hrs with intermission
SUBSCRIPTIONS START AT  $17.50
TICKETS START AT  $25

Buy Tickets

See all on-sale dates
Part of 2017 Winter/Spring Season and DanceAfrica Festival 2017

The Healing Light of Rhythm: Tradition and Beyond
Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam and Artistic Director Emeritus Chuck Davis
Forty years after its inauguration under the artistic direction of Chuck Davis, the nation’s largest festival of African dance returns for a special anniversary celebration. This year’s performance, under the leadership of Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam, is a special curated program that pays tribute to the past, present, and future of the landmark festival and the transformative power of movement.
Members of Philadelphia’s hip-hop based Illstyle & Peace Productions join with members of New York City’s Forces of Nature Dance Theatre and the drummers and dancers of Asase Yaa, performing a joyful collision of traditional and contemporary styles. Then, Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble—a master group of US-based Guinean dancers and musicians—present a spirited showcase of West African culture. Both groups are joined by the BAM/Restoration Dance Youth Ensemble.
Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble
Asase Yaa
Forces of Nature Dance Theatre
llstyle & Peace Productions
BAM/Restoration Dance Youth Ensemble (Brooklyn)
Lighting design by Al Crawford
Sound design by David Margolin Lawson
Costume design by Hopie Lyn Burrows
Read the BAM program notes for Danceafrica 2017

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Artists
Abdel R. Salaam

Abdel R. Salaam is the Artistic Director for DanceAfrica.

Abdel R. Salaam

DanceAfrica Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam is the executive artistic director and choreographer of Forces of Nature Dance Theatre, which he co-founded in 1981. The company led the historic procession for Nelson and Winnie Mandela on their visit to New York in 1990 and, along with Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, received the 41st annual Audelco Award for Excellence in Black Theater Award as the 2013 Dance Company of the Year.

Salaam has directed and choreographed for theater and television to critical acclaim and has been active in the world of the performing and visual arts since 1955. He has served on the faculties of Lehman College, the American Dance Festival in the US and Korea, Alvin Ailey American Dance Center, and the Chuck Davis Dance Academy. He is currently a director at the Harlem Children’s Zone/Forces of Nature Youth Academy of Dance and Wellness at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Harlem. He has received many awards, including the Monarch Merit Award for Outstanding Achievement in Dance from the National Council for Arts & Culture (1993), the Silver Anniversary Award for Outstanding Achievement in Choreography, Teaching and Performance from Lehman College (1994), and Better Family Life Lifetime Achievement Award in Arts (2000). Salaam is a 2004 New York Foundation for the Arts fellow and was an artist in residence at the Tennessee Performing Art Center from 2003 to 2007.

<a target=”_blank”><img width=”305″ height=”305″ src=”/media/3376500/32163_DanceAfrica_Bio_AbdelSalaam_305x305.jpg” alt=”” /></a>

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Artists
Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble

This Guinea company is led by Artistic Director M’bemba Bangoura.

Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble

Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble comprises 17 master drummers, dancers, and instrumentalists, all from their native country of Guinea. They bring with them the vast knowledge of the traditional music and dance from each region and represent more than 15 different Guinean ethnicities. Wula Artistic Director M’bemba Bangoura, who has played the djembe drum since childhood, has traveled the world as a performer and teacher and is acclaimed for his high level of mastery of the drum. At age 21, he was invited to play for Ballet Djoliba, the national company of Guinea. Since moving to the US in 1992, Bangoura has become an integral part of the drum and dance scene, teaching hundreds of students, many of whom are now teachers themselves. Additionally, Bangoura has choreographed his own works and developed repertory for many dance companies worldwide.

<a target=”_blank”><img width=”305″ height=”305″ src=”/media/9195437/wula-305×305.jpg” alt=”Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble” /></a>Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble

 

Artists
Asase Yaa African American Dance Theater

This company of musicians, dancers, and vocalists was founded by Artistic Director Yao Ababio.

Asase Yaa African American Dance Theater

Asase Yaa African American Dance Theater was founded in 2001 by Artistic Director Yao Ababio. With a diversity of artistic skill, this company of musicians, dancers, and vocalists creates unique productions that mine the richness of the African diaspora. The company has appeared in VH1’s Hip Hop Honors Awards; Sing Your Song, a documentary about Harry Belafonte at the Apollo Theater; DanceAfrica; Kente Arts Alliance in Pittsburgh; and the first annual dance festival at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. In January 2013 Asase Yaa opened its own multi-cultural performing arts facility in Brooklyn.

<a target=”_blank”><img width=”305″ height=”305″ src=”/media/9115594/asae-yaa-305×305.jpg” alt=”Asae Yaa” /></a>Asae Yaa

 

Artists
Forces of Nature Dance Theatre

Forces of Nature performs a blend of contemporary dance and traditional African forms.

Artists

Forces of Nature Dance Theatre

Forces of Nature Dance Theatre Company was founded by Executive Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam, Executive Managing Director Olabamidele Husbands, and company member Dyane Harvey in 1981. The group has produced ballet and concert pieces and offered dance classes and educational programs in New York and throughout the world for over 36 years.

Forces of Nature performs a unique blend of contemporary modern dance, traditional West African and neo-African dance, contemporary ballet, house and hip-hop forms, and martial arts. The company has performed and toured widely throughout the US and abroad. In addition to annual appearances at Aaron Davis Hall, the Apollo Theater, and New Jersey Performing Arts Center, the ensemble has also performed at the Joyce Theater, the American Dance Festival, Cathedral of St. John the Divine, and the International Association of Blacks in Dance (IABD) among others.

Forces of Nature was part of the 12th Annual Festival for Peace in Moscow, the only African-American dance company to engage with members of the Bolshoi Ballet, and had the honor to dance and lead the historical procession for Nelson Mandela during his first appearance in the US in 1990. The company was featured in the three-part PBS series Free to Dance, as part of Great Performances, on the history of black dance in the 20th-century. Forces of Nature was also the featured dance company in the film and Smithsonian exhibition When the Spirit Moves, on the influence of African-American dance in Western culture. And most recently, the company was honored with the 41st annual Vivian Robinson AUDELCO Award for Best Dance Company of 2013

In addition to performing and touring, Forces of Nature has gained national and international recognition for its work with youth of all ages through workshops, master classes, and training seminars. The company has developed ongoing programs offered to schools, community service organizations, and cultural art institutions, believing that the arts, coupled with informative, stimulating academic presentations and creative participation, are among the best educational tools for redirecting youth on a positive, progressive, alternative path.

 

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BAM/Restoration DanceAfrica Ensemble celebrates ancestral roots and the modern-day community.

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Sat, May 20, 2017

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May 22—Jun 30, 2017

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FilmAfrica 2017
May 26—May 29, 2017

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May 26—May 29, 2017

This cinematic companion to the annual DanceAfrica celebration features the best narrative and documentary films from across Africa and beyond, with a special focus on Guinea.

Film Series

FilmAfrica 2017

Le Balon d'or

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May 26—May 29, 2017
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Part of BAMcinématek and DanceAfrica Festival 2017

Co-presented by the New York African Film Festival

This cinematic companion to the annual DanceAfrica celebration features the best narrative and documentary films from across Africa and beyond, with a special focus on Guinea.

<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8805923/clouds-over-conakry-640×359.jpg” alt=”Clouds Over Conakry, Film Africa” />Clouds Over Conakry, Film Africa
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Clouds Over Conakry
Fri, May 26, 2017
Clouds Over Conakry
Fri, May 26, 2017

A young artist is torn between following his father’s path and living his own life.

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<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8805930/rain-the-color-blue-2-640×359.jpg” alt=”Rain The Color Blue, Film Africa” />Rain The Color Blue, Film Africa
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Rain the Color of Blue with a Little Red In It
Fri, May 26, 2017
Rain the Color of Blue with a Little Red In It
Fri, May 26, 2017

This homage to Purple Rain, the first narrative feature in the Tuareg language is the universal story of one musician’s struggle to make it against all odds.

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<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8806040/martha-and-niki-640×359.jpg” alt=”Martha And Niki, Film Africa” />Martha And Niki, Film Africa
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Martha & Niki
Sat, May 27, 2017
Martha & Niki
Sat, May 27, 2017

This documentary chronicles the incredible story of the first-ever female champions of the largest hip-hop street-dance competition in the world.

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<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8805942/paris-according-to-moussa-640×359.jpg” alt=”Paris According To Moussa, Film Africa” />Paris According To Moussa, Film Africa
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Paris According To Moussa
Sat, May 27, 2017
Paris According To Moussa
Sat, May 27, 2017

An immigrant on an important trip finds difficulties and solidarity in France, in this film which was awarded the Human Rights Award by the United Nations.

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<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8826647/guinea-docs-640×359.jpg” alt=”Guinea Docs” />Guinea Docs
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Guinean Independence Documentaries
Sun, May 28, 2017
Guinean Independence Documentaries
Sun, May 28, 2017

One of the first African nations to win its independence, this program of rare documentaries gives an intimate first-hand account of life in Guinea in the first years of independence.

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<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8159802/17-CTEK-0026_Le_Balon_Dor_640x359.jpg” alt=”Le Balon d’or” />Le Balon d'or
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Le Ballon d’or
Sun, May 28, 2017
Le Ballon d’or
Sun, May 28, 2017

A spirited young boy pursues his dream of becoming a professional soccer player in this vivid, joyous portrait of growing up in West Africa.

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<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8805954/price-of-love-3-640×359.jpg” alt=”Price Of Love, Film Africa” />Price Of Love, Film Africa
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Price of Love
Mon, May 29, 2017
Price of Love
Mon, May 29, 2017

A young taxi driver must confront his past when he helps a prostitute out of a fight.

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<img width=”305″ height=”171″ src=”/media/8805936/shorts-program-640×359.jpg” alt=”Shorts Program, Film Africa” />Shorts Program, Film Africa
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Shorts Program
Mon, May 29, 2017
Shorts Program
Mon, May 29, 2017

A group of contemporary stories on love and connection in the French-African diaspora.

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<img width=”153″ height=”146″ src=”/media/9577283/17-MKTING-0605-NEW-DanceAfrica2017-310×296.jpg” alt=”DanceAfrica 2017 ” />DanceAfrica 2017

 
Neighborhood
DanceAfrica 2017 Bazaar
May 27—May 29, 2017

DanceAfrica 2017 Bazaar
May 27—May 29, 2017
Rain or Shine!

DanceAfrica’s beloved bazaar returns, featuring more than 150 vendors from around the world, offering African, Caribbean, and African-American food, crafts, and fashion.
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Free

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DanceAfrica Master Class
Mon, May 29, 2017

DanceAfrica Master Class
Mon, May 29, 2017

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DanceAfrica Family Workshop
Mon, May 29, 2017

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Mon, May 29, 2017

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Iconic BAM Artists
Chuck Davis

Chuck Davis

Chuck Davis (1937—2017) was the founding artistic director of DanceAfrica, BAM’s longest running series, and one of the foremost teachers and choreographers of traditional African dance in America.
MORE
CONTACT
Sign up to receive BAM email

Sign-up for our email lists and receive exclusive ticket offers, discounts, and updates.
Sign up
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Santana Redux w/ The BRC Orchestra

The all-stars of Black Rock Coalition honor legend Carlos Santana for Cinco De Mayo.
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Rabasi Joss with Soul Inscribed

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Fri, May 19, 2017

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Dance | Music
DanceAfrica 2017
 

May 26—May 29, 2017

Performance dates & times
LOCATION:
Peter Jay Sharp Building

BAM Howard Gilman Opera House
RUN TIME: Approx 2hrs with intermission
SUBSCRIPTIONS START AT  $17.50
TICKETS START AT  $25

Buy Tickets

See all on-sale dates
Part of 2017 Winter/Spring Season and DanceAfrica Festival 2017

The Healing Light of Rhythm: Tradition and Beyond
Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam and Artistic Director Emeritus Chuck Davis
Forty years after its inauguration under the artistic direction of Chuck Davis, the nation’s largest festival of African dance returns for a special anniversary celebration. This year’s performance, under the leadership of Artistic Director Abdel R. Salaam, is a special curated program that pays tribute to the past, present, and future of the landmark festival and the transformative power of movement.
Members of Philadelphia’s hip-hop based Illstyle & Peace Productions join with members of New York City’s Forces of Nature Dance Theatre and the drummers and dancers of Asase Yaa, performing a joyful collision of traditional and contemporary styles. Then, Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble—a master group of US-based Guinean dancers and musicians—present a spirited showcase of West African culture. Both groups are joined by the BAM/Restoration Dance Youth Ensemble.
Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble
Asase Yaa
Forces of Nature Dance Theatre
llstyle & Peace Productions
BAM/Restoration Dance Youth Ensemble (Brooklyn)
Lighting design by Al Crawford
Sound design by David Margolin Lawson
Costume design by Hopie Lyn Burrows
Read the BAM program notes for Danceafrica 2017

Related Content

Artists
Abdel R. Salaam

Abdel R. Salaam is the Artistic Director for DanceAfrica.

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Wula Drum and Dance Ensemble

This Guinea company is led by Artistic Director M’bemba Bangoura.

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Asase Yaa African American Dance Theater

This company of musicians, dancers, and vocalists was founded by Artistic Director Yao Ababio.

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Artists
Forces of Nature Dance Theatre

Forces of Nature performs a blend of contemporary dance and traditional African forms.

MORE
Artists
Illstyle & Peace Productions

This Philadelphia-based dance company was founded in 2000 by Brandon “Peace” Albright.

MORE
Artists
BAM/Restoration Dance Youth Ensemble (Brooklyn)

BAM/Restoration DanceAfrica Ensemble celebrates ancestral roots and the modern-day community.

MORE

Related EVENTS

Neighborhood
Tribute to the Ancestors
Sat, May 20, 2017

Tribute to the Ancestors
Sat, May 20, 2017

This traditional tribute to those who have passed on features music and drumming, dance performances, and a libation ceremony for the ancestors conducted by the DanceAfrica Council of Elders.
MORE

Free

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DanceAfrica Community Day at RestorationART
Sat, May 20, 2017

DanceAfrica Community Day at RestorationART
Sat, May 20, 2017

This year’s festival kicks off with the annual community welcome for the artists, featuring performances by students from RestorationART who have participated in BAM Education’s DanceAfrica program.
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Free

Visual Art
Maeva Kounta: Modernism and Tradition
May 22—Jun 30, 2017

Maeva Kounta: Modernism and Tradition
May 22—Jun 30, 2017

BAM Visual Art presents a new work by Guinean painter and illustrator Maeva Kounta.
MORE

Free

Film Series
FilmAfrica 2017
May 26—May 29, 2017

FilmAfrica 2017
May 26—May 29, 2017

This cinematic companion to the annual DanceAfrica celebration features the best narrative and documentary films from across Africa and beyond, with a special focus on Guinea.
MORE

Neighborhood
DanceAfrica 2017 Bazaar
May 27—May 29, 2017

DanceAfrica 2017 Bazaar
May 27—May 29, 2017
Rain or Shine!

DanceAfrica’s beloved bazaar returns, featuring more than 150 vendors from around the world, offering African, Caribbean, and African-American food, crafts, and fashion.
MORE

Free

Classes
DanceAfrica Master Class
Mon, May 29, 2017

DanceAfrica Master Class
Mon, May 29, 2017

Participants are introduced to West African rhythmic traditions and learn the fundamentals of Guinean movement styles in this immersive workshop.
MORE

Classes
DanceAfrica Family Workshop
Mon, May 29, 2017

DanceAfrica Family Workshop
Mon, May 29, 2017

Caregivers and children alike deepen their engagement with DanceAfrica in this fun-filled, hands-on workshop focusing on Guinean movement and music.
MORE

Iconic BAM Artists
Chuck Davis

Chuck Davis

Chuck Davis (1937—2017) was the founding artistic director of DanceAfrica, BAM’s longest running series, and one of the foremost teachers and choreographers of traditional African dance in America.
MORE
CONTACT
Sign up to receive BAM email

Sign-up for our email lists and receive exclusive ticket offers, discounts, and updates.
Sign up
You Might Also Enjoy

MORE

Free

Music
Rabasi Joss with Soul Inscribed

The beloved funk band returns to BAM with Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Rabasi Joss.
Fri, May 19, 2017

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Free

Photo: Richard Termine and Julieta Cervantes
FOLLOW US
FAQ
Privacy Policy
Press
Contact Us

 

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May 18, 2017 Posted by | #dance, ART, avant-garde, BUSINESS, CULTURE, Dance, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, FOOD AND WINE, GUIDES, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, Music, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fim Review – GET OUT

Get Out

 

Jordan Peele wants both cultures ( majority culture and that of people of color) to feel like they are on the same page. We see ourselves in those moments and we trust the premise enough to be patient as the story rides out.

 

But the key here is portraying the overreaching white culture as the villain. (Spoiler alert) they so much want to adopt and assume black culture and ability that it is in white families and their neighbors’ interest to inhabit black bodies in the twilight of their lives to remain immortal. Herein lies the dilemma.

True – Whites want to erase minds and adopt advantages, but there is no room for people of color.

Fiction – Whites are doing this as mad scientists and not as assimilators of the culture itself.

As author and social essayist Greg Tate so aptly once put it, {whites} want “everything but the burden” of being black.

They are already assimilating the culture successfully and from afar. Only in “La La Land” is the white pianist saving real jazz, while the characters of color sell it out.

Only in “Get Out” is the TSA agent, played by a actual comedian”, naturally suspicious of white sincerity.

The natural order is upended by black characters only subservient because they are inhabited by white family members. In real life, class is the distinction, not merely racial identity. In the film, being a different skin is only an accident when it is not by choice. They want black people, they just don’t want the real African-rooted culture black people represent. Once blacks are dead, they are free to rule.

 

Technical aspects of the film follow the Blumhouse formula – tight contained script with few characters in a contained environment. A plot that can be described in terms simple enough to provide marketing by word of mouth. No actual stars to overwhelm or outweigh the mechanics of plot.

 

Jordan Peele ( of alleged comedy duo Key & Peele) provides a serviceable script that he ably directs with appropriate date night scares, twists and reversals. But Key & Peele are the only people of color who hate black people more than white people do. Their act is comprised of explaining or buffooning African American culture and examining white observations of the buffoonery. Minstrely without the burnt cork.

Unlike, say Dave Chappelle, they provide the white perspective of black culture, not as much satirizing it as examining the white take of the supposed deficiencies or contradictions. This is “Dave Chappelle Light” – none of the actual content, just the appearance of it.

 

It’s scary, but only because its demonization of the majority culture is a false one, not a metaphor of the actual problem. This is a world where everyone applauds and admires “Moonlight”, but actually buys the tickets only for “LaLa Land.” Just like real life but portrayed ironically, as if we expected otherwise.

 

The actual subtext of Get Out is the demonization of the white liberal as the sellout, not the demonization of the actual conservative corporate majority culture that destroys black bodies as it completely erases any culture that is not the mainstream.

 

White culture can be the villain, but not because it loves and admires non-whites too much.

 

Peele wants everyone on the same page, but that page must always be a white one. The “them” in “them or us” will always be foreign/alien/African at its root.

 

February 28, 2017 Posted by | CULTURE, FILM, HOLIDAY GUIDES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

FILM – FSLC and UniFrance announce complete lineup for Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, March 1-12

FSLC and UniFrance announce complete lineup for Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, March 1-12

The Film Society of Lincoln Center and UniFrance announce the complete lineup for the 22nd edition of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, the celebrated annual series showcasing the variety and vitality of contemporary French filmmaking, March 1-12.

The lineup features 23 diverse films, comprised of highlights from international festivals and works by both established favorites and talented newcomers, including François Ozon’s Lubitsch adaptation Frantz, set after World War I; Bertrand Bonello’s Nocturama, a provocative exploration of a Paris terrorist attack carried out by young activists; Bruno Dumont’s oddball slapstick detective story Slack Bay, starring Juliette Binoche; Rebecca Zlotowski’s visually arresting Planetarium, with Natalie Portman as a touring psychic who catches the eye of a movie producer in 1930s Paris; Jean-Stéphane Bron’s The Paris Opera, a documentary that peeks behind the scenes of the famed institution; and, for the first time, a Film Comment magazine presentation within Rendez-Vous with French Cinema: Julia Ducournau’s cannibal thriller Raw, which titillated audiences at Toronto and Cannes.

This year’s programming, including the selected films, panels, and events, includes a special focus on the myriad of ways that French culture influences the arts in America, and vice-versa. As previously announced, the Opening Night selection is the North American premiere of Étienne Comar’s Django, starring Reda Kateb as the legendary jazz musician and Cécile de France, and the Closing Night selection is the U.S. premiere of Jérôme Salle’s The Odyssey, with Lambert Wilson as explorer Jacques Cousteau and co-starring Audrey Tautou and Pierre Niney.

Selections in this year’s edition of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema garnered an impressive 47 combined nominations for this year’s César Awards, which were announced last week. Best Film nominees include Frantz (eleven nominations), Slack Bay (nine nominations), Nicole Garcia’s Marion Cotillard showcase From the Land of the Moon (eight nominations), and Justine Triet’s offbeat rom-com In Bed with Victoria (five nominations). In addition, Emmanuelle Bercot’s gripping real-life drama 150 Milligrams, with Sidse Babett Knudsen as a doctor who challenged the French pharmaceutical industry, received nominations for adapted screenplay and Best Actress; up-and-coming filmmaker Stephanie de Giusto was nominated for Best First Film for The Dancer, which stars Soko as modern dance icon Loïe Fuller and Lily-Rose Depp as Isadora Duncan (both nominated); and additional nominations went to Sébastien Marnier’s Faultless, Katell Quillévéré’s Heal the Living, Sólveig Anspach’s The Together Project, and Salle’s The Odyssey.

Filmmakers and talent who will be in attendance at this year’s festival include, in alphabetical order: Emmanuelle Bercot, Bertrand Bonello, Étienne Comar, Caroline Deruas, Stéphanie Di Giusto, Julia Ducournau, Marc Fitoussi, Marina Foïs, Cécile de France, Nicole Garcia, Christophe Honoré, Reda Kateb, Sébastien Marnier, François Ozon, Antonin Peretjatko, Katell Quillévéré, Jérôme Salle, Justin Taurand, Justine Triet, Martin Wheeler, and Rebecca Zlotowski.

The 2017 edition of Rendez-Vous also features a number of special events, headlined by an intimate discussion with Agnès Varda on March 10 and a free public screening of an episode of the hit French TV series Call My Agent! on March 11. Free talks will include a panel on the many ways that film can function as political intervention; a conversation with French and American film producers about international co-producing; and the festival’s annual panel featuring French Touch musicians and film composers. A special exhibition imported from the esteemed photography festival Les Rencontres d’Arles will be on view in the Walter Reade Theater’s Furman Gallery throughout the festival, displaying newly discovered color photos from behind the scenes of Fellini’s black-and-white masterpiece 8 1/2, shot by the late Paul Ronald and accompanied by recollections from the film’s co-star Anouk Aimée.

Co-presented with UniFrance, Rendez-Vous with French Cinema demonstrates annually that the landscape of French cinema is as fertile, inspiring, and distinct as ever. Press screenings will take place February 15-22 and will be announced in the coming weeks.

Artistic direction: Florence Almozini and Dennis Lim

The 22nd edition of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema benefits from the support of CNC, the Ministry of Culture and Communication, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development, PROCIREP, Renault Nissan, Lacoste, TV5 Monde, Cultural Services of the French Embassy, Sacem, FIAF, Blum & Poe, and The ENGIE Foundation.

Tickets go on sale Thursday, February 16, with early access for Film Society members beginning Tuesday, February 14. Tickets are $16; $12 for seniors (62+); and $10 for students and members; Opening Night tickets are $25; $20 for members, seniors, and students. Learn more at filmlinc.org.

FILMS & DESCRIPTIONS
All films are screened digitally at the Walter Reade Theater (165 W. 65th St.) unless otherwise noted

MAIN SLATE

Opening Night:
Django
Étienne Comar, France, 2017, 115m
French with English subtitles
North American Premiere
The world of legendary Romani jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt is brought to vivid life in this riveting saga of survival, resistance, and artistic courage. Reinhardt (Reda Kateb) is the toast of 1943 Paris, thrilling audiences with his distinctive brand of “hot jazz” and charming his admirers (including an intrepid friend and muse played by Cécile de France). But even as the rise of Nazism and anti-Romani sentiment force Reinhardt—whose music is considered degenerate under the Third Reich—to make a daring escape from the city, he refuses to be silenced, his music becoming his form of protest. The feature debut from acclaimed screenwriter Étienne Comar (Of Gods and Men) immerses viewers in a tumultuous chapter in the life of one of the 20th century’s greatest musical geniuses.
Wednesday, March 1, 6:00pm and 8:30pm (Étienne Comar, Reda Kateb, and Cécile de France in person)

Closing Night:
The Odyssey / L’odyssée
Jérôme Salle, France, 2016, 122m
French with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere
Lambert Wilson is magnetic in this grandly lyrical dramatization of legendary explorer-turned-filmmaker Jacques Cousteau. Spanning half a century and criss-crossing oceans, the film charts Cousteau’s professional triumphs and personal failures as he achieves renown for the underwater documentaries he produced on his oceanographic expeditions, amid the constant struggle to secure financial backing for increasingly ambitious scientific (and cinematic) objectives. Set against the backdrop of cross-generational family drama—centered on his long-suffering wife Simone (Audrey Tautou) and his talented, deeply conflicted son Philippe (Pierre Niney)—The Odyssey is an epic ode to scientific exploration and documentary filmmaking, and a celebration of the human drive to seek out new realms of discovery.
Saturday, March 11, 6:00pm (Q&A with Jérôme Salle)
Sunday, March 12, 8:00pm

150 Milligrams / La fille de Brest
Emmanuelle Bercot, France, 2016, 128m
French with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere
A fearless everywoman stands up to a drug company in this gripping David vs. Goliath story, based on a real-life medical scandal. Irène Frachon (Sidse Babett Knudsen) is a pulmonologist at a hospital in Brest who begins digging into the connection between a widely prescribed diabetes drug and a spate of fatal valve disorders, with help from a research scientist (Benoît Magimel). Soon enough, Irène sets off a media firestorm, making powerful enemies in the pharmaceutical industry who will stop at nothing to suppress her story. Knudsen and writer-director Emmanuelle Bercot have created a memorably eccentric heroine, at once a tireless crusader and compelling human.
Saturday, March 4, 3:15pm (Q&A with Emmanuelle Bercot)
Monday, March 6, 4:15pm

The Dancer / La danseuse
Stéphanie Di Giusto, France/Belgium/Czech Republic, 2016, 108m
English and French with English subtitles
This visually sumptuous drama set amidst the opulence of La Belle Époque Paris charts the real-life saga of modern dance icon Loïe Fuller (Soko). Raised on the plains of the American Midwest, Fuller became the unlikely toast of turn-of-the-century France with her legendary performances, in which swirling swaths of silk fabric and dazzlingly colored lights created a kaleidoscopic spectacle of color and movement. Boasting lavish period detail, breathtaking dance sequences, and fiercely committed performances by Gaspard Ulliel, Mélanie Thierry, and Lily-Rose Depp as Fuller’s rival Isadora Duncan, The Dancer is an arresting chronicle of an artist’s struggle to realize her vision.
Thursday, March 2, 1:45pm
Monday, March 6, 9:30pm (Q&A with Stéphanie Di Giusto)

Daydreams / L’indomptée
Caroline Deruas, France, 2016, 98m
French and Italian with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere
Past and present, fantasy and reality collide in the boldly original feature debut from Caroline Deruas. A group of young French artists converge at Rome’s sun-dappled Villa Medicis for a one-year residency. Among them are Camille (Clotilde Hesme), a writer whose marriage to a famous novelist (Tchéky Karyo) is disintegrating, and Axèle (Jenna Thiam), an erratic photographer haunted by spectral visions of the villa’s past. Deruas conjures a subtly surreal atmosphere through striking stylistic flourishes—iris shots, color effects, dream sequences—in this beguiling tale of creative struggle, romantic rivalry, and ghosts.
Wednesday, March 8, 4:30pm
Friday, March 10, 6:45pm (Q&A with Caroline Deruas)

Faultless / Irréprochable
Sébastien Marnier, France, 2016, 103m
French with English subtitles
Out of money and options, 40-year-old Constance (Marina Foïs) abandons her life in Paris and returns to her suburban hometown in hopes of picking up where she left off. After she finds no real romance from her occasional lover (Benjamin Biolay), something finally snaps when she discovers that her old job as a real-estate agent has been given to a younger woman (Joséphine Japy). It soon becomes clear: Constance is dangerous, and will stop at nothing to get what she wants. Both a wild-ride thriller and a chilling character study, Faultless is driven by a riveting central performance: almost always onscreen, Foïs brings unexpected depth and poignant humanity to her portrayal of a coldly calculating sociopath.
Sunday, March 5, 6:15pm (Q&A with Sébastien Marnier and Marina Foïs)
Monday, March 6, 2:00pm

Frantz
François Ozon, France/Germany, 2016, 113m
French and German with English subtitles
The new film from acclaimed director François Ozon is a sublime, heartrending saga of guilt, forgiveness, and forbidden love in post–World War I Europe. Based on Ernst Lubitsch’s 1932 antiwar drama Broken Lullaby, it charts the complex bond that forms between two strangers: Anna (Paula Beer), a young German woman grieving the loss of her fiancé, Frantz, in the war, and Adrien (Pierre Niney), a former French soldier. What plays out between them is a haunting investigation of postwar trauma and healing rendered in gorgeous black-and-white that occasionally gives way—gloriously—to psychologically charged bursts of color. A Music Box Films release.
Thursday, March 2, 9:15pm (Q&A with François Ozon)
Saturday, March 11, 1:00pm

From the Land of the Moon / Mal de pierres
Nicole Garcia, France/Belgium/Canada, 2016, 116m
French and Spanish with English subtitles
Marion Cotillard delivers a performance of searing emotional intensity in this psychologically charged, 1950s-set saga of amour fou. She stars as Gabrielle, a troubled young woman—sick in both body and mind—who is stuck in a loveless marriage. When she travels to Switzerland for a rest cure, she meets the handsome, terminally ill lieutenant André (Louis Garrel), beginning a decades-long romantic obsession that will shape the course of her life. Beautifully photographed in the sunny south of France and the snow-capped Swiss mountains, From the Land of the Moon is an exquisite showcase for one of the finest actresses working today. A Sundance Selects release.
Friday, March 3, 6:30pm (Q&A with Nicole Garcia)
Sunday, March 12, 1:00pm

Heal the Living / Réparer les vivants
Katell Quillévéré, France/Belgium, 2016, 103m
French with English subtitles
A medical drama of unusual depth and sensitivity, Heal the Living charts the disparate lives touched by a tragedy. Following a car accident, 17-year-old Simon (Gabin Verdet) is left brain-dead, setting into motion a chain of events that affects everyone from his family to the hospital staff to a mother of two (Anne Dorval) in need of a heart transplant. Director Katell Quillévéré weaves together the multistrand narrative with consummate grace, abetted by a remarkable ensemble cast (including Emmanuelle Seigner and Tahar Rahim), elegant camerawork, and a striking score by Alexandre Desplat. The result is an enormously affecting study of human interconnectedness that finds a silver lining of hope in a wrenching situation. A Cohen Media Group release.
Thursday, March 2, 6:30pm (Q&A with Katell Quillévéré)
Friday, March 3, 1:45pm

In Bed With Victoria / Victoria
Justine Triet, France, 2016, 97m
English and French with English subtitles
Victoria (Virginie Efira) is a hotshot lawyer with a disastrous personal life. Between juggling a demanding job, raising two kids, and fending off an ex-husband who’s slandering her on the Internet, she can barely be bothered with the hit-or-miss (mostly miss) online hookups she sets up. Around the time Victoria agrees to help her old friend Vincent (Melvil Poupaud) with a decidedly bizarre legal matter, she runs into a charming former client Sam (Vincent Lacoste). Now that a shot at real romance comes along, will the perpetually harried Victoria even recognize it? This refreshingly offbeat (how else to describe a film that features a trial in which the star witness is a Dalmatian?) farce is propelled by Efira’s irresistible performance as a heroine who’s raw, real, and complicated in ways that transcend the rom-com formula.
Saturday, March 4, 9:30pm (Q&A with Justine Triet)
Sunday, March 12, 3:30pm

In the Forest of Siberia / Dans les forêts de Sibérie
Safy Nebbou, France, 2016, 105m
English, French, and Russian with English subtitles
Based on the award-winning memoir by adventurer Sylvain Tesson, this tale of survival follows Teddy (Raphaël Personnaz), a young Frenchman who leaves everything behind to live in isolation in the icy Siberian taiga. But initial exhilaration soon gives way to the harsh reality of staying alive in a frozen wilderness miles from civilization with roaming bears, life-threatening blizzards, and no electricity. The film captures majestic footage of the unspoiled Siberian landscape, its bleak beauty underscored by jazz trumpeter Ibrahim Maalouf’s plaintive soundtrack.
Sunday, March 5, 1:00pm
Thursday, March 9, 4:00pm

Journey to Greenland / Le Voyage au Groënland
Sébastien Betbeder, France, 2016, 98m
English, Inuktitut, and French with English subtitles
Scruffy, thirtysomething best friends both named Thomas (Thomas Blanchard and Thomas Scimeca) leave behind their struggling acting careers in Paris for an extended sojourn in a remote, snowbound stretch of Greenland. One is there to reconnect with his off-the-grid father, the other for adventure. What ensues is a perceptive, warm-spirited study of cross-cultural misunderstanding and connection, as the two men learn to survive in a place without alcohol, indoor plumbing, or a reliable Internet connection. Director Sébastien Betbeder balances wry, unforced comedy with casual insight into human relationships: between friends, family members, and the strangers who touch your life. A Netflix release.
Tuesday, March 7, 4:30pm
Wednesday, March 8, 6:45pm

Mum’s Wrong / Maman a tort
Marc Fitoussi, France/Belgium, 2016, 110m
French with English subtitles
When idealistic 14-year-old Anouk (Jeanne Jestin) embarks on a weeklong internship at her mom’s insurance company, she gets a crash course in the less-than-rosy reality of the corporate world, discovering some unsavory truths about her own mother along the way. An emotionally complex look at parents, children, and the moral compromises we make, Mum’s Wrong adroitly blends workplace satire with a compassionate social-issue message, while its leads Jestin and Émilie Dequenne (Rosetta, Our Children) create a nuanced, wholly believable portrait of a mother-daughter relationship undergoing a crisis.
Sunday, March 5, 3:30pm (Q&A with Marc Fitoussi)
Friday, March 10, 2:00pm

Nocturama
Bertrand Bonello, France/Germany/Belgium, 2016, 130m
French with English subtitles
The audacious new film from Bertrand Bonello (Saint Laurent) unfolds in two mesmerizing segments. The first is a precision-crafted thriller, following a multi-ethnic group of millennial radicals as they carry out a mass-scale terrorist attack on Paris. The second—in which the perpetrators hide out in the consumerist mecca of a luxury department store—is the director’s coup, raising provocative questions about everything that came before. Bonello stages his apocalyptic vision with stylishly roving camerawork, blasts of hip-hop, and a lip-synced performance to Shirley Bassey’s “My Way.” This is edgy, risk-taking filmmaking that is sure to ignite debate. A Netflix release.
Saturday, March 4, 6:15pm (Q&A with Bertrand Bonello)
Sunday, March 5, 9:00pm (Introduction by Bertrand Bonello)

The Paris Opera / L’Opèra de Paris
Jean-Stéphane Bron, France, 2017, 110m
French with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere
This all-access documentary goes behind the scenes of the Paris Opera, following the array of personnel—management, performers, costumers, cleaning crew—who work to bring breathtaking spectacle to audiences night after night. Over the course of a season, director Jean-Stéphane Bron nimbly juggles a dizzying number of storylines, from labor disputes to procuring a live bull for Schoenberg’s Moses und Aron to a PR crisis involving the head of the company’s ballet. Sweeping in scope yet full of intimate human moments, The Paris Opera offers a candid look at everything that goes into operating one of the world’s foremost performing arts institutions.
Thursday, March 2, 4:00pm
Saturday, March 11, 3:30pm

Planetarium
Rebecca Zlotowski, France/Belgium, 2016, 105m
English and French with English subtitles
Natalie Portman lends her star power to this dreamy, visually ravishing tale of magic and movies set in a glamorous vision of 1930s Paris. She and her sister (Lily-Rose Depp) form a psychic duo, touring the stages of Europe performing séances. When they catch the eye of a movie producer (Emmanuel Salinger), he resolves to make them stars and to capture an act of spiritualism on film. Forgoing traditional narrative structure in favor of swooning atmosphere, director Rebecca Zlotowksi revels in the Art Deco architecture, sumptuous period couture, and doomed decadence of prewar Paris. A Swen Group release.
Friday, March 3, 9:30pm (Q&A with Rebecca Zlotowski)
Tuesday, March 7, 2:00pm

Film Comment Presents:
Raw / Grave
Julia Ducournau, France/Belgium, 2016, 99m
French with English subtitles
When incoming freshman—and lifelong vegetarian—Justine (Garance Marillier) joins her older sister (Ella Rumpf) at a strangely decrepit veterinary college, she seems poised to be the school’s new star pupil. But a hazing ritual in which she’s forced to eat raw meat awakens something primal in Justine: a newfound—and highly disturbing—taste for flesh. The feature debut from Julia Ducournau marks the arrival of a bold new directorial voice, blending blood-spattered body horror, pitch-black comedy, and one of the most dysfunctional sisterly relationships ever depicted on screen into a potent, emotionally resonant coming-of-age nightmare. A Focus Features release.
Tuesday, March 7, 6:45pm (Q&A with Julia Ducournau)
Wednesday, March 8, 9:15pm (Introduction by Julia Ducournau)

Right Here Right Now/ Tout de suite maintenant
Pascal Bonitzer, France/Belgium/Luxembourg, 2016, 98m
French with English subtitles
Workplace drama doesn’t get any messier than in this intriguingly knotty tale of corporate backbiting and buried secrets. Nora (Agathe Bonitzer) is a bright young professional whose new job at a financial firm turns out to be a trial by fire when she learns that her bosses (Lambert Wilson and Pascal Greggory) share a tumultuous history with her prickly mathematician father (Jean-Pierre Bacri). Meanwhile, an interoffice romance with a competitive colleague (Vincent Lacoste) leads to even more complications, leaving Nora to navigate a minefield of delicate relationships as she climbs the corporate ladder. Isabelle Huppert costars and delivers a typically multilayered performance as one of many sharply etched characters populating this complex moral tale.
Friday, March 10, 9:30pm
Sunday, March 12, 5:45pm

Slack Bay / Ma Loute
Bruno Dumont, France/Germany, 2016, 122m
English and French with English subtitles
In a postcard-perfect seaside village in 1910, an eccentric (to put it mildly) leisure-class family whiles away the summer. But something troubling is afoot: what’s behind the string of tourists gone mysteriously missing? Former enfant terrible Bruno Dumont continues his surprising foray into farce—which began with 2014’s acclaimed Li’l Quinquin—with this surreal, oddball mix of slapstick and detective story. The director and his cast (which includes Fabrice Luchini, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, and a very game Juliette Binoche) stretch each joke to its breaking point, resulting in a winking, weirdly captivating comedy that’s in on its own absurdity. A Kino Lorber release.
Thursday, March 9, 6:30pm
Saturday, March 11, 9:00pm

Sophie’s Misfortunes / Les malheurs de Sophie
Christophe Honoré, France, 2016, 106m
French with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere
Based on the French children’s classic by the Countess of Ségur, the latest from Christophe Honoré is an enchanting fable for adults and kids alike, set in a light-filled 19th-century chateau. The film captures the imaginative freedom of childhood through the eyes of the irrepressible Sophie (Caroline Grant), a mischievous young girl whose life changes drastically after she’s left in the care of a severe stepmother (Muriel Robin)—a far cry from the life she had with her loving mother (Golshifteh Farahani). With the help of her two friends and their mother (Anaïs Demoustier), Sophie works to escape her stepmother’s wicked grasp. Throughout, Honoré combines gorgeous period detail with playful modern touches: a bouncy electronic score by Alex Beaupain, expressive handheld camerawork, and a menagerie of animated animals.
Saturday, March 4, 12:30pm (Q&A with Christophe Honoré)
Wednesday, March 8, 2:00pm (Intro with Christophe Honoré)

The Stopover / Voir du pays
Delphine & Muriel Coulin, France/Greece, 2016, 102m
French and Greek with English subtitles
On their way home from Afghanistan, a band of French soldiers stop in Cyprus for decompression: three-days at a sun-splashed resort, where they will undergo intense psychological debriefing. There, amidst the crystal-blue waters and hordes of vacationing tourists, Marine (Soko) and Aurore (Ariane Labed)—two of only three women in their male-dominated unit—confront rage, trauma, and army sexism as they struggle to readjust to “normal” life. This riveting drama—winner of the Best Screenplay award in the Un Certain Regard competition at Cannes—is an all-too-rare exploration of war’s psychological wounds on female soldiers. A First Run Features release.
Thursday, March 9, 9:00pm
Friday, March 10, 4:15pm

Struggle for Life / La Loi de la jungle
Antonin Peretjatko, France, 2016, 99m
French with English subtitles
In this wild, joke-a-minute slapstick satire, a middle-aged intern (Vincent Macaigne) is sent from France to French Guiana to oversee the creation of a South American ski resort led by Galgaric (Mathieu Amalric). There, he meets a beautiful intern at the National Forestry Office named Tarzan (Vimala Pons) and what ensues is a surreal journey through the Amazon jungle, with absurdist bureaucratic disasters, an aphrodisiac mishap, and a cannibal encounter. Playing something like a Jerry Lewis gag-fest meets Survivor, Struggle for Life combines anarchic black comedy with a scathing critique of colonialism.
Monday, March 6, 7:00pm (Q&A with Antonin Peretjatko)
Tuesday, March 7, 9:15pm (Introduction by Antonin Peretjatko)

The Together Project / L’effet aquatique
Sólveig Anspach, France/Iceland, 2016, 83m
English, French, and Icelandic with English subtitles
The final film from the late French-Icelandic director Sólveig Anspach is an irresistibly offbeat aquatic comedy. When gawky construction worker Samir (Samir Guesmi) encounters prickly swim instructor Agathe (Florence Loiret Caille), he’s immediately smitten. But his unconventional plan to win her over—pretending he can’t swim in order to take lessons from her—proves more than a little problematic. Sweet without being cloying, quirky without being grating, this romantic charmer succeeds thanks to the interplay between the two leads and Anspach’s breezy sincerity.
Friday, March 3, 4:00pm (Q&A with composer Martin Wheeler)
Thursday, March 9, 2:00pm

SPECIAL EVENTS

Live Talk with Agnès Varda
French New Wave pioneer Agnès Varda has been a major voice in world cinema for more than sixty years, ever since her 1955 debut feature La Pointe Courte. Her distinguished and varied career includes photography, nonfiction and fiction shorts and features, and, more recently, multimedia installations at museums and galleries around the world. Join Varda in this special live event as she reflects on her voluminous body of work, influences, and approach to filmmaking.
Presented in conjunction with the French Institute Alliance Française’s upcoming series Agnès Varda: Life as Art and Varda’s first exhibition in NYC at Blum & Poe gallery.
Friday, March 10, 6:00pm
*Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater, 144 West 65th Street

Panel: International Co-Productions
Producers from the U.S. and France will sit down to discuss the strategies and challenges of international co-productions—from the creative to the technical, and everything in between. Scheduled panelists include Killer Films’ Head of Production & Development David Hinojosa (Wiener-Dog, Frank & Lola), Parts & Labor co-founder Jay Van Hoy (Beginners, Frank & Lola, The Witch), and Les films du bélier’s Justin Taurand (Heal the Living, 2016 IFCIC Award for Best Young Producer). Moderated by Eugene Hernandez. Presented in partnership with IFP and French in Motion.
Thursday, March 2, 5:30pm
*Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater, 144 West 65th Street

Panel: Film as Political Intervention
In response to the disillusionment and frustration currently felt worldwide, directors from this year’s edition will discuss how films can address political turmoil or social unrest and operate as whistle-blowers.
Friday, March 3, 5:00pm
*Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater, 144 West 65th Street

Panel: Julian Starke’s French Waves with French Touch DJs Pedro Winter, Para One and Jacques
French touch (aka French house) musicians Pedro Winter, Para One, and Jacques will discuss their perspectives on and experiences with French electronic music following a free screening of Julian Starke’s French Waves, an immersive documentary that pinpoints key moments of French Touch since the 1990s.
Saturday, March 4, 5:00pm
*Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater, 144 West 65th Street

Free Screening: Call My Agent! / Dix pour cent
Episode 1 (“Cécile”), France, 2015, 60m
French with English subtitles
At a top-tier talent firm in Paris, a group of agents juggle their personal and hyper-competitive work lives after experiencing an unexpected crisis. Watch the first episode of the hit French miniseries, created by Dominique Besnehard and Fanny Herrero and featuring Cécile de France (who also appears in this year’s Opening Night film, Django), at this special free screening during Rendez-Vous with French Cinema. A Netflix original series.
Saturday, March 11, 4:30pm
*Venue: Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater, 144 West 65th Street

EXHIBITION

Fellini, 8 ½ in Color
PHOTOGRAPHS BY PAUL RONALD
Curated by Sam Stourdzé
8 ½ was Federico Fellini’s last black-and-white film after more than a decade of directing. Although the film’s images were never intended to be seen in color, Piero Servo—a frequent camera operator for Fellini—recently found the late photographer Paul Ronald’s long-forgotten box of color negatives. These rediscoveries are the focus of this year’s Rendez-Vous with French Cinema exhibition, curated by Sam Stourdzé, the director of the esteemed Les Rencontres d’Arles, and accompanied by recollections from one of the film’s stars, Anouk Aimée.
Special thanks to Anouk Aimée, Piero Servo, Antonio Moraldi, and Stéphane Marti.
On view in the Furman Gallery in the Walter Reade Theater, March 1-12

UNIFRANCE
For more than 65 years, UniFrance has been using its experience of the international marketplace for the good of French cinema. UniFrance is based in Paris, and also has representatives in New York, Seoul, Beijing, and Tokyo. Its membership brings together around 1,000 French producers, filmmaking talents, agents, and sales companies, who are working together to promote French film among foreign audiences, industry executives, and media.

UniFrance receives generous, year-round support from CNC, the Ministry of Culture and Communication, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development, Institut français, PROCIREP, Renault, Lacoste, Air France and Titra Film. For more information, visit http://en.unifrance.org/.

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
The Film Society of Lincoln Center is devoted to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema. The only branch of the world-renowned arts complex Lincoln Center to shine a light on the everlasting yet evolving importance of the moving image, this nonprofit organization was founded in 1969 to celebrate American and international film. Via year-round programming and discussions; its annual New York Film Festival; and its publications, including Film Comment, the U.S.’s premier magazine about films and film culture, the Film Society endeavors to make the discussion and appreciation of cinema accessible to a broader audience, as well as to ensure that it will remain an essential art form for years to come.

The Film Society receives generous, year-round support from The New York Times, Shutterstock, Variety, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. American Airlines is the Official Airline of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. For more information, visit www.filmlinc.org and follow @filmlinc on Twitter.

February 9, 2017 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, FILM, HOLIDAY GUIDES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

We Recommend : Support A Woman Filmmaker on Indiegogo

Creative Block: A New Bilingual Film
A short film about creativity: having it, losing it, and going the distance to get it back again.

Nicola Rose
New York, United States
$2,300 USD raised by 101 backers
27% of $8,500

flexible goal

a month left
OVERVIEW
Creative Block is a short film about creativity and what happens when we lose it. It’s about the distance we’ll go to get it back again, and the people we invest our trust in along the way – maybe to be disappointed, maybe to come out stronger at the other end.

I’m Nicola Rose, producer of Creative Block, and I need your help to finish my film. We’ve shot one day of principal photography in Paris, France, and now we have the rest to do in NYC. I hope you’ll consider helping me fund it.

Slideshow of our first filming day in Paris, Nov. 4, 2016

Creative Block: the story (in English and French) / Bloc et Blocage: L’histoire (en anglais et français)

A short film weaving surrealism into everyday life, Creative Block (French title Bloc et Blocage) introduces us to Claire, a young artist and puppet-maker in New York. One day, she suffers a huge rupture in her creative thought, leading to depression. She soon becomes convinced the only cure is the art of another: Thibaut, a figure skater in Paris. Spellbound by the artistry of this athlete she only knows from TV, Claire impulsively goes to Paris herself. There, she discovers the unexpected: Thibaut, too, is suffering from creative block. At that point, it’s up to Claire to find the road back to her own creativity: a road strewn with disappointments, revelations … and balloons.

Court-métrage bilingue mêlant surréalisme et sentiments du quotidien, Creative Block (en français Bloc et Blocage) raconte un moment important dans la vie de Claire, jeune artiste et créatrice de marionnettes vivant à Manhattan. La jeune femme réalise qu’elle souffre d’une grande rupture dans sa vie créatrice et que le seul remède est l’art d’un autre. Celui de Thibaut, un patineur artistique vivant à Paris. Bouleversée par la personnalité artistique de ce dernier qu’elle ne connait qu’à travers la télévision, Claire, n’écoutant que ses pulsions, se rend à Paris. Elle y découvre l’inattendu : Thibaut, souffre de son propre blocage artistique ! C’est dorénavant à Claire de trouver la route qui la ramènera à sa propre créativité : une route bordée de déceptions, de révélations… et de ballons.

About the Filmmaker

Nicola Rose is a producer, director and actress in New York City. She is the creator of the short form comedy webseries Callie & Izzy, about a girl with a puppet growing out of her hand (you can see a couple of her favorite episodes below). She is also the creator of a musical, Aisle Six, which premiered Off-Broadway at NYC’s Lynn Redgrave Theater in 2013. In addition, she works as a professional puppeteer in NYC, performing frequently for the New York  Public Library, American Scandinavian Foundation, children’s museums, schools and more. She is a graduate of Columbia University and the Université Sorbonne-Nouvelle in Paris.

What we’ve done so far… and what we need now:

In November 2016, thanks to talented director Véronique Doumbé and a formidable production team in Paris, France, we shot the “French part” of our film! Needless to say, that was the most complicated part logistically (since I am based in New York). But from a technical standpoint, it was the simplest. That means the rest, the “New York part” of the film, is what will cost. We will need your help to cover the following:

  • Compensation of cast and crew
  • Equipment rental
  • Location rental
  • Construction and purchase of props
  • Insurance
  • Transportation
  • Meals for crew and cast
  • Post-production (editing, color, additional after-effects, music, subtitling)

How you can help, and what you get:

EVERY DOLLAR HELPS! I’m serious: Every. Single. Dollar. I’ve learned this from running (and donating to) prior campaigns. If you want to donate, but can only donate one dollar or euro, DO IT! It will pay for several minutes at a location; several batteries for equipment; postcards for publicity; part of a prop; a small portion of work from a crew member… you get the idea. EVERYTHING you donate will ease the burden on our producer (aka me) ;), and you’ll be helping us to make a better film that YOU, with any luck, will love.

I’ve paid personally for what we’ve done so far, and I’d gladly do the same for the rest – but I can’t. 🙂 And that’s why I need you.

Please see the sidebar for the perks your donations will get you. I had fun thinking them up, and I hope you’ll enjoy receiving them as well!

What’s next?

Once financially able, we will begin shooting our New York scenes, which make up the majority of the film. We aim to finish production by mid-2017 and post-production later in the year, so that with any luck, the film will be finished and en route to festivals before 2018. Meanwhile, I am maintaining a “making-of” Tumblr about the film, which you can follow at http://creativeblockfilm.tumblr.com.

 

Thank you! / Questions?

First of all, thank you for reading this far! If you’ve done so, that means you’re at least considering us. Second of all, thanks for listening — for being curious, and for considering this little film about creativity, depression and balloons. We hope you donate, but even if you don’t, we’re honored you thought of us.

If you have any questions at all, please email me at nicolarosemail@gmail.com.

 

PERKS
$40

 

USD

 

+ Shipping
Sock Puppet!
All of the above plus a custom-made sock puppet!
Items included:

  • Thank-you on social media
  • Profile your business/project
  • Special Thanks in Credits
  • Custom-Made Sock Puppet!
6 claimed
Ships Worldwide
$1

 

USD
Thank You
Every single donation gets a heartfelt thank you from me on all our social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr). Unless you don’t want it, of course.
Items included:

  • Thank-you on social media
6 claimed
$10

 

USD
We’ll Profile Your Project
A thank you, plus we’ll profile your business or a project of your choice on social media.
Items included:

  • Profile your business/project
17 claimed
$20

 

USD
Finger puppet
A finger puppet made just for you!
Items included:

  • Thank-you on social media
  • Profile your business/project
  • Custom-Made Finger Puppet!
3 claimed
Ships to: United States
$25

 

USD
Special Thanks in Credits
All of the above, plus you’ll be listed in our credits under “Special Thanks To”.
Items included:

  • Thank-you on social media
  • Profile your business/project
  • Special Thanks in Credits
9 claimed
$50

 

USD
Special Thanks/Exclusive Card
All of the above, plus an exclusively designed Creative Block thank-you notecard.
Items included:

  • Thank-you on social media
  • Profile your business/project
  • Exclusively designed notecard
  • Special Thanks + Goodies
  • and 2 more items
1 claimed
$100

 

USD
Special Thanks/Extra Goodies
All of the above, plus an exclusive Creative Block balloon and a DVD of the film.
Items included:

  • Thank-you on social media
  • Profile your business/project
  • Creative Block balloon
  • DVD of the film
  • and 2 more items
2 claimed
$200

 

USD
Co-Producer
All of the above, plus a personalized video thank-you from Nicola, an official film poster, and credit as a Co-Producer.
Items included:

  • Thank-you on social media
  • Profile your business/project
  • Credit as Co-Producer
  • Exclusively designed notecard
  • and 5 more items
0 claimed
$500

 

USD
Producer
All of the above, plus credit as Producer and an official “making of Creative Block” scrapbook.
Items included:

  • Thank-you on social media
  • Profile your business/project
  • Exclusively designed notecard
  • Credit as Producer
  • and 6 more items
0 claimed
$1000

 

USD
Executive Producer
All of the above, plus a copy of the script and credit as Executive Producer.
Items included:

  • Profile your business/project
  • Exclusively designed notecard
  • Creative Block balloon
  • DVD of the film
  • and 6 more items
0 claimed
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December 17, 2016 Posted by | BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NYC High School Students: Submit Dance Films for an Opportunity to Screen at Dance on Camera Festival! APPLY BY JANUARY 15

           


NYC High School Students: Submit Dance Films for an Opportunity to Screen at Dance on Camera Festival!

APPLY BY JANUARY 15

Submissions are now open for Capturing Motion NYC, Dance Films Association’s annual workshop series and dance film competition for students!

High school students from any of NYC’s five boroughs may submit dance films between 1-5 minutes in length. Our call for submissions will be open until January 15, 2017. Finalists and the winning film will screen at the 45th Annual Dance on Camera Festival (February 3 ‒ 7,2017) co-presented by Dance Films Association and the Film Society of Lincoln Center. In addition, DFA will partner with Choreoscope International Dance Film Festival in Barcelona, Spain to present the Capturing Motion NYC winning film.

Films should be between 1-5 minutes in length and feature dance as the main component. We accept dance films of all genres that address the relationship between dance and the camera. Any subject may serve as inspiration: social or street dance, dance in religious settings, professional dance, or non-dance images filmed so that they evoke dance, choreography, and movement in imaginative ways.

Click below to view the guidelines and submit films by 11:59PM EST on January 15, 2017. Email info@dancefilms.org with any questions!

Bring Capturing Motion NYC to your school or organization!
Schedule a dance film workshop, master class, lecture, or screening led by an industry professional.
Dance Films Association works with high schools, after school programs, and arts organizations to program dance film workshops, master classes, lectures, and screenings led by industry professionals. In past years, we’ve collaborated with The Beacon School, Brownsville Academy High School, and Frank Sinatra School of the Arts, and with organizations such as Dancewave, the New Museum, and Abrons Arts Center.

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Photos (top to bottom):

Still from THIS TOWN, 2016 Capturing Motion NYC Winning Film
Dir. Alexus Getzelmen, Tillie Simon, and Isabelle Sturges

Behind-the-scenes video from the YAK Films-led ChoreoCollective workshop at Abrons Arts Center, Spring 2016
Video by Brighid Greene

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November 29, 2016 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Theatre/Profiles: Audelco Award Nominee WALK HARD actress Gabrielle C. Archer

The Audelco Awards are the Independent Black Theatre Awards equivalent to the TONY’S.

On Nov. 21, the 44th Annual Vivian Robinson AUDELCO Recognition Awards for Excellence in Black Theatre will be  given in Neew York City, New York, at Symphony Space.

Vivian Robinson established AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee) as a non-profit membership organization in 1973. At the time, the AUDELCO awards were the only awards ceremony to celebrate the accomplishments of African Americans in the fields of theatre and dance. The principal mission of the AUDELCO Awards is to enhance a comprehension of the arts in African-American communities. The AUDELCO Awards also aim to generate new audiences for non-profit theatre companies and to ensure better public relations.

We had a chance to interview one of the RISING stars, actress Gabrielle C. Archer

headshot

Describe your latest play and your role:

This past Spring I played Ruth in Walk Hard directed by Imani Douglas and written by Abraham Hill, founder of the American Negro Theatre. Ruth is girlfriend to protagonist, Andy Whitman. Andy is a bright but stubborn shine boy turned boxer in Jim Crow New York. The battles inside the ring mirror those outside of it. I believe Ruth to be the moral compass of the play and for Andy. She tries to keep him focused but cool headed & reasonable. She believes power is in organizing. She is part of the nascent movement of unions budding in the late 30s. 

I loved Ruth. She is a strong and powerful woman. A wise and tender soul with whom I nonetheless parted ways in the play’s finale. In my mind, I thought her final words were a bit of a sell out. She speaks of the struggle being that of poor people in general. True words that are a bit All Lives Matter to me. An actor mustn’t judge his character, though, but rather try his best to understand him. Those were my personal feelings, I kept them separate. At the end of the day she was her own kind of warrior and Andy’s rock. 

I was really honored to be part of a team of  much more experienced and talented actors  in a little downtown theatre with a lot of repute with regards to show-casing challenging, subversive, engaging and political pieces. The Metropolitan Playhouse always hosts talk backs after the Sundaymatinees of every run. These talk-backs are enlightening. On our last talk back we had the delightful surprise of having playwright Mr Hill’s family there to exchange ideas and reactions. It’ll always be one of my proudest moment having them express great pleasure at our telling of the story. It was a fun and growing experience all in all.

You have done a lot of theatre work . Is the stage your preferred platform?

I’ve mainly done theatre, yes. I haven’t fully delved into the world of film. I have done a few indies but I do feel more comfortable on stage. By comfortable I by no means mean that I don’t get utterly nervous each time I do a play, but I like the continuity and chronology of stage work. Once you step on that stage there is no turning back -you have to be in every moment till the curtain goes down. Film is very intimate and requires different techniques I must hone. I plan on increasing my experience in that field. 

You notched Shakespeare on your belt in CORIOLANUS. 

Explain the attraction of Shakespeare for actors.

It’s the great frontier. He is a poet, a master of language and story-telling. Shakespearian language is intimidating but beautiful and fun. I’ve always loved language for language itself and anyone who does can appreciate the rhythm, music of Shakespeare’s tales. 

Actors are always training. what are you studying now?

I hadn’t taken a class in far too long (it’s expensive and I figured let me get in there and learn by dong it and doing it with experienced, better actors to keep me on my toes). But acting is a muscle that must constantly be worked out in order not to atrophy. No excuses.

 I got lucky and came upon Alice Spivak through an actor friend of mine. She has been in the industry for a long time and studied with the classic teachers. Her class is very enjoyable and challenging. She is tender and knowledgeable. I am at the moment juggling with 4( soon to be 5) characters ranging from Shakespeare to Chekhov to Neil Simon. It’s great fun being in a class of broad age range and an array of talent from advanced to professional.

How is it? do you have a preferred style or method? what and why? 

Alice bases her teaching on the Stanislavsky technique but strays from it as well. She’s brilliant! Studying your craft is so important but I believe in using tools from all techniques and mixing it up for whatever works for you in a given circumstance. 

The interview continues below…

Metropolitan Playhouse
The American Legacy

220 East Fourth Street ~ New York, New York 10009
Administration: (212) 995 8410  ~  Tickets: (800) 838 3006

A 2007 Company of the Year ~ nytheatre.com

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2015-2016 Season
AUDELCO VIV Award Nominee
Best Revival
“A major rediscovery….a cast that excels.”
Peter Filichia
“An electrifying revival”
– Victor Gluck,
Joshua David Scarlett and Peter Tedeschi
photo: Jacob J. Goldberg Photography

What’s worth the fight?

Walk Hard
by Abram Hill
February 19 – March 20, 2016

A bright young man with quick fists is given the shot to be a champion boxer… if he is willing to accept the racist rules that govern America of the 1930’s.

A play from the co-founder of the
American Negro Theater.

Read More about the play and
The American Negro Theater

Running Time: 2:00

SUNDAY TALKBACKS…following the matinees
February/March 2016
Sun Mon Tues
Weds Thurs Fri Sat
19

7:30 pm

20

7:30 pm

21
3 pm
22

7:30 pm

23 24 25

7:30 pm

26

7:30 pm

27

7:30 pm

28
3 pm
TALK
29 1 2 3

7:30 pm

4

7:30 pm

5

7:30 pm

6
3 pm
TALK
7 8 9
3 pm
10

7:30 pm

11

7:30 pm

12
3 pm
7:30 pm
13
3 pm
TALK
14 15 16
3 pm
17

7:30 pm

18

7:30 pm

19
3 pm
7:30 pm
20
3 pm
TALK
Featuring:
Frank Anderson*
Gabrielle C. Archer
Craig Anthony Bannister*
Michael Basile*
Sean Michael Buckley*
Chris Krause
Beethovan Oden*
Joshua David Scarlett
Vanessa Shaw
Joy Sudduth
Peter Tedeschi*
Kim Yancey-Moore*

Crew:
DIRECTOR Imani
STAGE MANAGER  William Vann Carlton*
LIGHTING Melody Beal
COSTUME  Sidney Fortner
SOUND  Bill Toles
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR  LaVonda Elam

*These actors and stage manager appear courtesy of
Actors Equity Association.
Walk Hard is an AEA Approved Showcase

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You are fluent in French and studied at the Sorbonne. What was that experience like?

I used my year abroad to go home for a year and live alone. I studied Literature, Psychology and a bit of Film at the Sorbonne and at Paris X Nanterre University (where my mother went). These schools are polar opposites. The Sorbonne is a prestigious and picturesque school in the heart of Paris whereas Nanterre is a large, more modern public university with little architectural charm on the outskirts of the city. Both are good and have historical value. I enjoyed going from one to the other and learned from each. I preferred Nanterre which had more warmth -in my experience- than the Sorbonne with its intimidating cold marble floors and quiet hallways. The classes there were challenging and mind-titillating. Nanterre was vibrant with more diverse, “on the fringe”, young  minds. 

Paris is just as contrasted and contradictory. You can get lost in the streets of Paris for hours on end…  It is eternally beautiful but within it is a lot of sadness, dissatisfaction, anger and divide. It’s still one of the prettiest places I’ve ever seen. I saw a lot of ugly, but Paris has timeless charm, great food, culture and love of Philosophy*. (*that endless search for truth/knowledge)

You have also directed and recently started in production as well. Does that appeal to you? Why or why not?

I’d like to do more of both. Any production is good, hard team work. We’re all essential pieces of a puzzle. I’m interested in seeing all sides of things. Learning more about every aspect of my industry can only help me in my craft.

Producing is multitasking and problem solving. Developing those skills is interesting to me and will be useful. 

Directing is multi-tasking but it’s more focused. You are painting a picture. As of now, I still have work to do in terms of seeing and creating a Vision. But I can do detail -I’m an actor- so, I’m more of an actor’s director. I know how to speak to my fellow actors in order to bring out what’s needed for the overall picture. There is a language we share, an energy and a deep understanding. I need more notches on my belt to really feel comfortable with the title of director. It was a scary and very fulfilling to manage a 12 person cast under pressure. My mentor at the time would just say, “You have to make a decision. It’s going up.”

That was a great learning experience for me and I can’t wait to get another opportunity to gain more confidence and skill in that realm. 

Describe your training and background.

I’m born in Paris. Left there when I was 7 and came to New York. I went to the French Lycée, graduated with a Literature/Philosophy Baccalaureat. I then attended Amherst College (even kicked it with Lupita!). I then moved back to New York and kind of threw myself into it in a non orthodox way. I started with community theatre in Brooklyn, working with a church-based theatre troupe on a one act play called One Hour 2 Live. It told the story of a young man -a gang recruit- on death row visited by a pastor who wants to reconcile him with his devastating actions. The young man is also visited by his victims. Two of the three victims are acquaintances and I, the third, played a complete stranger. I represented a future cut short as well as the daughter he would have had. The young man is forced to delve into his past and the psychology behind what brought him to this point. It was a very powerful play which we performed throughout the boroughs and New Jersey at middle and high schools, churches, community and family centers etc. We’d have talk backs with the children (and often the boys would go off with the male actors) as well as with community leaders and mothers/family members affected by incarceration and the consequences of gang activity. We even performed at Rikers. (I had mixed feelings about that.) It was a very emotional and (sometimes) fulfilling experience. 

This is people’s real lives- it’s tough. If we were able to reach just one kid in that crowd and inspire them to stay focused, know their worth then it was worth it.  

I did that for four years and then worked an entire year on a play that would be my debut as a young professional actress (Agnes of God). It very abruptly and at the very last minute fell through and that was a painful (even a bit traumatizing) experience. But through it I met my friend and mentor, Leslie Dockery (a broadway vet, dancer, choreographer extraordinaire) and through her I found a whole community of mentors with 30 years of experience under their belt who have embraced me. I’m the baby in the group and have a ways to go. But this vet black theatre community seems to have taken me under their wing and I am blessed to have that support. My journey brought me to Imani Douglas, the Castillo Theatre (which is volunteer based with strong youth community involvement)  and, finally, the Metropolitan Playhouse which is a prestigious little downtown theatre. Simultaneously, in indie film I have found a network of young, ambitious like-minded creators and story-tellers. 

I hope to keep expanding my horizons and make proud all the people who have helped me along the way. I’ve been lucky to have them. 

What does the Audelco nomination mean to you?

The AUDELCO (Audience Development Commitee, Inc.) Recognition Awards or the “Viv Awards” (a wink to founder Vivian Robinson)  honors excellence in the black theatre at professional and non-for-profit levels. It is a pioneer organization, based out of Harlem, that has been around since the 70’s & has awarded many of the greats of the African-American theatre community (such as composer Eubie Blake, choreographer Debbie Allen and even Kerry Washington before Scandal).  It’s like the black Tony Awards! This’ll be my second time going. The first time I went as co-director of a new play Leslie Dockery and I put up at Theatre for The New  City in downtown Manhattan. She was up for Best Choreography and won! That was exciting. She’s been around for a while now and I’m lucky to call her big sister, mentor and friend.

I definitely felt Walk Hard deserved a nod or some recognition because the talent was top-notch and the story is inspiring and quite relevant to today. It was a happy and humbling surprise to find out we were nominated for Best Revival! 

Keeps raising the bar for me which is always the goal and I get to be around and part of yet another piece of Black History.

You come from an illustrious family background. Explain.

Growing up I had the blessing of calling a living piece of history my grand-father or G-daddy -as my sister and I liked to call him. He was our very own piece of World, American and Black History!

My grand-father, Lee Andrew Archer was a Tuskeegee Airman. He was part of the 332nd Fighter Group and became the first black Ace (he shot down 5 enemy fighter aircraft). He flew the “Macon Belle” named after my beautiful grand-mother, Ina, born in Macon, Georgia. He later maintained a career in the US Airforce as a Lieutenant Colonel. After retiring from the military, he became a successful business man and mentor to other successful black business men. In 2004 he received the French Legion of Honor. That was a proud day for us as a family. I remember being there on the coast of Normandy and being thrilled at just how unique and special he was. In 2007 he received the Congressional Medal. At the end of the day, though, he was just our grand-daddy who provided us with a great family foundation and a lucky childhood. We knew how cool he was but naturally, in retrospect and as I get older, I regret not having asked more questions. I just hope to continue to make him proud and share his story and strong legacy. Y parents are also diplomats and writers.

Do you have a specific plan for the future?

I want to venture more into film and work on television eventually. I want to experience what the industry is like in Atlanta and then L.A. I’d love to do a French film. French cinema (especially the New Wave era) has always been inspiring to me. 

Essentially, I want to continue expanding my horizons while working on inspiring projects and telling unique and/or important stories.

Right now I’m working on Miranda –  a film that will bring awareness to domestic abuse. The talent is immense but the funds are limited. If anyone would like to help bring this project to fruition please go to www.gofundme.com/mirandamovie and you can check out director’s previous work at kentsuttton.com. Thanks for the support!

What was your most satisfying performance to you?

I really enjoyed playing “One Dropper” Emma in One Drop a piece by Andrea Fulton set in 1800s Louisiana. It’s based on her family history and tells of an African-American couple who chose to stay in their community and prosper rather than leave and pass. It spoke to me on a very deep level. I particularly liked how beautifully it communicated a part of Black History to children and all ages through original New Orleans music and classical story-telling form.

I think performing for the youth earlier in my career was the most fulfilling for me. Children are our most important and essential resource. To have them come talk to us after each show, just looking to connect, receive advice, inspiration, motivation, recognition, things we all need and deserve, was very rewarding. One Hour 2 Live was a tough play (written by a pastor in Brooklyn tired of counseling those affected by gang violence) but it had a cathartic effect on who needed it. I’ll never forget the one time a young woman cried out in the middle of the play and had to be escorted out. That was difficult, staying in character during that moment. I hope we didn’t hurt her heart but rather opened it because she felt heard, noticed and cared for. I’ll also always remember a little boy -one of many- standing up after a performance and vowing unprompted to choose his friends wisely and focus on being his best self. Hearing the youth speak -express themselves so intelligently- while surrounded by a caring community of mothers, parents and teachers was the most satisfying. 

What would you like your legacy to be?

I want to stay true to myself – my complicated, imperfect self- tell stories from all walks of life (the good, the bad, the beautiful and the ugly) so we can stop judging each other and see our common humanity.

I’d like to make my grand-daddy proud. Keep telling important stories but also have fun. 

I want to reach children and inspire them. I want to spread love, warmth, self-worth and respect for our elders, our history, our ancestry, what brought us all to this point as we look forward and live our biggest life. 

I’m not literate enough in the history of Black Theatre to give much of an opinion except that I am so happy and proud that its legacy is being so wonderfully upheld. Black theaters such as the National Black Theatre, based in ever-changing Harlem, are still up and kicking and need our continued support. Brilliant talents like Danai Gurira who are telling stories never told on Broadway and opening eyes so eloquently are very motivating!

Playing Salome was fun. She is the ultimate femme fatale but she is also a child. The role was divided in two and I played her innocent side -which wasn’t quite as appealing to me. I nonetheless enjoyed delving into the Old World and using elevated almost Shakespearian language. 

My advice to newcomers would be study, work and surround yourself with ambitious people. Find mentors to help guide you. Creating a strong reel and having a strong headshot is also essential. 

Thank You, Ms. Archer!

The AUDELCO AWARDS will be presented November 21, 2016 in New York City

Walk Hard
by Abram Hill

co-founder of the American Negro Theater

 Walk Hard

Joshua David Scarlett
photo: Alex Roe

What’s worth fighting for?

February 19 – March 20, 2016

 METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE
220 E 4th Street
New York, NY

800 838 3006

 

Previews Begin
Friday, February 19th

Opening Night
Friday, February 26th
Performance and Reception
7:30 pm

Performances through March 20th

From 1944

Working as a shoeshine boy in 1939, nineteen-year-old Andy Whitman’s ambition is limited only by the color of his skin.
Bright, industrious, and black, his daily struggle makes make him quick with his temper and his fists.
When he catches the eye of a boxing manager in a street fight, Andy is soon a rising star in a fast-paced game.
But it is a game of devil’s bargains, played with dubious partners, and some rules never change when a black man looks for respect in a white world.

We are delighted to revive this remarkable drama as part of our 24th Season,
The Season of Hope.

 

METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE
220 E 4th Street
New York, NY

Walk Hard

February 19th – March 20th, 2016

Thursdays – Saturdays at 7:30 pm
Sundays at 3 pm

PLUS
Pay What You Will: Monday, 2/22 at 7:30pm
Added Matinees: Wednesdays (3/9 & 3/16) Saturdays (3/12 & 12/19) at 3pm

Talkbacks after Sunday matinées.

 

*These actors appear courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association.
Walk Hard
is an AEA Approved Showcase

AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee, Inc.)

The AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee, Inc.) is an organization that acknowledges and honors Black Theatre and its artists in New York City. Established and incorporated in 1973 by the late Vivian Robinson, to stimulate interest in and support of performing arts in black communities.

AUDELCO Recognition Awards – The annual Vivian Robinson/AUDELCO Recognition, “The VIV”Awards are the only formally established awards presented to the black theatre community.  Every third Monday in November the nominees are awarded in various categories.

 

 

 

2016 Nominees

LIGHTING DESIGN
Alan C. Edwards (Macbeth)
Nathan Hawkins/William Kenyon (Blood at the Root)
Tyler Micoleau (Familiar)
Austin R. Smith (The Royale)
Thom Weaver (The Total Bent)

SET DESIGN
Michael Carnahan (Skeleton Crew)
Maruti Evans (Dead and Breathing)
G.W. Mercier (Head of Passes)
Clint Ramos (Familiar)
Daniel Robinson (The First Noel)

COSTUME DESIGN
Dede M. Ayite (The Royale)
Gabriel Berry (The Total Bent)
Rachel Dozier-Ezell (Macbeth)
Susan Hilferty (Familiar)
Toni-Leslie James (Head of Passes)

SOUND DESIGN
Obadiah Eaves/Sten Severson (The Total Bent)
Rob Kaplowitz (Skeleton Crew)
John McKenna (Macbeth)
Liz Sokolak (Blood at the Root)
Darron L. West (Familiar)

DIRECTOR/DRAMATIC PRODUCTION
Carl Cofield (Macbeth)
Kenny Leon (Smart People)
Jonathan McCrory (Dead and Breathing)
Ruben Santiago-Hudson (Skeleton Crew)
Liesl Tommy (Eclipsed)

DIRECTOR/MUSICAL PRODUCTION
Steve H. Broadnax III (The First Noel)
Jeff Calhoun (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
Angie Kristic (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Joanna Settle (The Total Bent)

PLAYWRIGHT
Lydia Diamond (Smart People)
Colman Domingo (Dot)
Danai Gurira (Familiar)
Chisa Hutchinson (Dead and Breathing)
Dominique Morisseau (Skeleton Crew)
Marco Ramirez (The Royale)

SUPPORTING ACTOR
Francois Battiste (Head of Passes)
Jason Dirden (Skeleton Crew)
Michael Potts (Mother Courage and Her Children)
Larry Powell (The Christians)
David Roberts (The Fall of the Kings)
Kim Sullivan (The Piano Lesson)

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Ito Aghayere (Familiar)
Alana Arenas (Head of Passes)
Vinie Burrows (I Will Look Forward to This Later)
Montego Glover (The Royale)
Nikiya Mathis (Skeleton Crew)
Linda Powell (The Christians)
Myra Lucretia Taylor (Familiar)

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN A MUSICAL – FEMALE
Tina Fabrique (The First Noel)
Ashley Ware Jenkins (The First Noel)
Traci Michelle (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN A MUSICAL – MALE
Ato Blankson-Wood (The Total Bent)
Isaac Gay (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Vondie Curtis Hall (The Total Bent)
Maurice Hines (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
CB Murray (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Nathaniel Stampley (The First Noel)

CHOREOGRAPHY
Brian Harlan Brooks (The First Noel)
Maurice Hines (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
David Neumann (The Total Bent)
Tiffany Rea-Fisher (Macbeth)
Kyndra “Binkie” Reevey (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)

OUTSTANDING ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE
A Lovely Malfunction (Negro Ensemble Company)
Barbecue (The Public Theater)
but I cld only whisper (The Flea)
Dead and Breathing (National Black Theatre)
Eclipsed (The Public Theater)
Proof (Quick Silver Theatre/Classics in Color Theatre Co.)
Timeless: The Mystery of the Dark Water (Black Spectrum Theatre)

SOLO PERFORMANCE
Trezana Beverley (Mabel Madness)
Staceyann Chin (Motherstruck!)
Cherie Danielle (The Diary of An Afro Goddess)
Tommie J. Moore (Dare to Be Black: The Jack Johnson Story)
Khalil Muhammad (Pryor Truth)
Reginald L. Wilson (Sugar Ray)

LEAD ACTOR
Mahershala Ali (Smart People)
Khris Davis (The Royale)
RJ Foster (Richard III)
Wendell B. Franklin (Skeleton Crew)
Joe Morton (Turn Me Loose)
Jahi Kassa Taquara (The Piano Lesson)

LEAD ACTRESS
Lynda Gravatt (Skeleton Crew)
Marjorie Johnson (Dot)
Kecia Lewis (Mother Courage and Her Children)
Phylicia Rashad (Head of Passes)
Tessa Thompson (Smart People)
Tamara Tunie (Familiar)

BEST REVIVAL
In the Heights (Harlem Repertory Theatre)
In White America (New Federal Theatre)
Macbeth (Classical Theatre of Harlem)
Mother Courage and Her Children (Classic Stage Company)
Proof (Quick Silver Theatre/Classics in Color Theatre Co.)
The Piano Lesson (Gallery Players)
Walk Hard (Metropolitan Playhouse)

MUSICAL PRODUCTION OF THE YEAR
Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse (La Mama)
Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life (New World Stages)
The First Noel (Classical Theatre of Harlem)
The Total Bent (The Public Theater)

DRAMATIC PRODUCTION OF THE YEAR
Dead and Breathing (National Black Theatre)
Dot (Vineyard Theatre)
Familiar (Playwrights Horizons)
Skeleton Crew (Atlantic Theater Company)
Smart People (Second Stage Theatre).
The Royale (Lincoln Center Theater)

 

As a “Friend of AUDELCO,” you receive discounts to some of your favorite Off and Off-Off Broadway theatres when you attend theatre and dance productions.

AUDELCO, Inc. activities include:

Networking – Contacting and developing relationships with individuals, local groups, churches, and other organizations to introduce new audiences to non-profit performing arts.

AUDELCO Recognition Awards – The annual Vivian Robinson/AUDELCO Recognition, “The VIV”Awards are the only formally established awards presented to the black theatre community.  Every third Monday in November the nominees are awarded in various categories.

Theatre for the Future:Young Audiences Series – Addresses the need for positive cultural experiences for children between the ages of 10-17.  This series provides entertainment and cultural experience for the youth.  This series provides entertainment and cultural enrichment in non-academic settings such as: outdoor activities during Harlem Week; Saturday matinees during Black Arts Festival; Holiday celebrations in December, and performances during Black History Month.

Black Theatre Archives – A collection of books, tapes, original scripts, costumes and set designs, photographs, playbills and extensive clippings on current theatre groups and activities.

Publications-“INTERMISSION”, AUDELCO‘s newsletter is published quarterly to stimulate interest in the performing arts.  The “OVERTURE”, a black theatre magazine that is published to document exciting work done by Black theatre artists.

Seminars, Lectures, and Forums- Addresses the general awareness about the contributions of Blacks in the cultural and socio-economic environment.

November 18, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2017 WHITNEY BIENNIAL, THE FIRST TO TAKE PLACE IN THE MUSEUM’S DOWNTOWN BUILDING, TO OPEN MARCH 17

2017 WHITNEY BIENNIAL, THE FIRST TO TAKE PLACE IN THE MUSEUM’S DOWNTOWN BUILDING, TO OPEN MARCH 17

NEW YORK, November 17, 2016—The formation of self and the individual’s place in a turbulent society are among the key themes reflected in the work of the artists selected for the 2017 Whitney Biennial, opening at the Whitney Museum of American Art on March 17, and running through June 11. Curated by the Whitney’s Nancy and Fred Poses Associate Curator Christopher Y. Lew and independent curator Mia Locks, this will be the first Biennial held in the Whitney’s home in the Meatpacking District. The country’s preeminent survey of the current state of American art, this is the seventy-eighth in the Museum’s ongoing series of Annuals and Biennials, initiated by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney in 1932.

Lew and Locks named the sixty-three participants, whose works will fill two of the four main gallery floors of the Whitney (including the 18,000-square-foot Neil Bluhm Family Galleries on the fifth floor) and numerous other spaces throughout the Museum. The participants range from emerging to well-established individuals and collectives working in painting, sculpture, drawing, installation, film and video, photography, activism, performance, music, and video game design.

Scott Rothkopf, the Whitney’s Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator and Deputy Director for Programs, said, “Since we opened our new building, we’ve reignited our emerging artist program with venturesome solo premieres and ‘snapshot’ shows of new tendencies. This Biennial, the largest ever in terms of gallery space, marks the capstone of these efforts. Chris and Mia have done an amazing job scouring the country to discover new talents, while creating lively connections to senior figures and our roiling social landscape.”

Lew commented that, “Throughout our research and travel we’ve been moved by the impassioned discussions we had about recent tumult in society, politics, and the economic system. It’s been unavoidable as we met with artists, fellow curators, writers, and other cultural producers across the United States and beyond.” Locks noted: “Against this backdrop, many of the participating artists are asking probing questions about the self and the social, and where these intersect. How do we think and live through these lenses? How and where do they fall short?”

Rothkopf is leading a team of advisors who are working closely with Lew and Locks to help shape the exhibition. They include: Negar Azimi, writer and senior editor at Bidoun, an award-winning publishing, curatorial, and educational initiative with a focus on the Middle East and its diasporas; Gean Moreno, curator of programs at the Institute of Contemporary Art Miami and founder of [NAME] Publications; Aily Nash, co-curator of Projections, the New York Film Festival’s artists’s film and video section, and Film and Media Curator at Basilica Hudson; and Wendy Yao, a publisher and founder of both the exhibition space 356 South Mission Road and Ooga Booga, a shop with two Los Angeles locations that specializes in independent books, music, art, and clothing. Nash, together with the curators, is co-organizing the Biennial film program, which will screen in the Whitney’s third-floor Susan and John Hess Family Theater.

The 2017 Biennial will be accompanied by an exhibition catalogue, designed by Olga Casellas Badillo of San Juan-based Tiguere Corp., which includes essays by the curators as well as Biennial advisors Negar Azimi and Gean Moreno, a conversation between the curators and Scott Rothkopf, and a roundtable with filmmakers moderated by Aily Nash. The book will also feature individual entries on each of the sixty-three participants in the exhibition along with reproductions of their work. It will be published by the Whitney Museum of American Art and distributed by Yale University Press.

The full list of artists follows:

Zarouhie Abdalian
Born 1982 in New Orleans, LA
Lives in New Orleans, LA

Basma Alsharif
Born 1983 in Kuwait City, Kuwait
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Jo Baer
Born 1929 in Seattle, WA
Lives in Amsterdam, Netherlands

Eric Baudelaire
Born 1973 in Salt Lake City, UT
Lives in Paris, France

Robert Beavers
Born 1949 in Brookline, MA
Lives in Berlin, Germany and Falmouth, MA

Larry Bell
Born 1939 in Chicago, IL
Lives in Taos, NM and Los Angeles, CA

Matt Browning
Born 1984 in Redmond, WA
Lives in Seattle, WA

Susan Cianciolo
Born 1969 in Providence, RI
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Mary Helena Clark
Born 1983 in Santee, SC
Lives in Hamilton, NY

John Divola
Born 1949 in Santa Monica, CA
Lives in Riverside, CA

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer
Born 1979 in New York, NY
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Rafa Esparza
Born 1981 in Los Angeles, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Kevin Jerome Everson
Born 1965 in Mansfield, OH
Lives in Charlottesville, VA

GCC
(Nanu Al-Hamad, Abdullah Al-Mutairi, Aziz Alqatami, Barrak Alzaid, Khalid al Gharaballi, Amal Khalaf, Fatima Al Qadiri, Monira Al Qadiri)
Founded 2013

Oto Gillen
Born 1984 in New York, NY
Lives in New York, NY

Samara Golden
Born 1973 in Ann Arbor, MI
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Casey Gollan and Victoria Sobel
Born 1991 in Los Angeles, CA; born 1990 in Washington, DC
Lives in New York, NY; lives in New York, NY

Irena Haiduk
Biographical information not given

Lyle Ashton Harris
Born 1965 in Bronx, NY
Lives in New York, NY

Tommy Hartung
Born 1979 in Akron, OH
Lives in Queens, NY

Porpentine Charity Heartscape
Born 1987, location not given
Lives in Oakland, CA

Sky Hopinka
Born 1984 in Bellingham, WA
Lives in Milwaukee, WI

Shara Hughes
Born 1981 in Atlanta, GA
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Aaron Flint Jamison
Born 1979 in Billings, MT
Lives in Portland, OR and Seattle, WA

KAYA
(Kerstin Brätsch and Debo Eilers)
Founded 2010

Jon Kessler
Born 1957 in Yonkers, NY
Lives in New York, NY

James N. Kienitz Wilkins
Born in 1983 in Boston, MA
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Ajay Kurian
Born 1984 in Baltimore, MD
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Deana Lawson
Born 1979 in Rochester, NY
Lives Brooklyn, NY

An-My Lê
Born 1960 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Leigh Ledare
Born 1976 in Seattle, WA
Lives in New York, NY

Dani Leventhal
Born 1972 in Columbus, OH
Lives in Columbus, OH

Tala Madani
Born 1981 in Tehran, Iran
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Park McArthur
Born 1984 in Raleigh, NC
Lives in New York, NY

Harold Mendez
Born 1977 in Chicago, IL
Lives in Chicago, IL and Los Angeles, CA

Carrie Moyer
Born 1960 in Detroit, MI
Lives in New York, NY

Ulrike Müller
Born 1971 in Brixlegg, Austria
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Julien Nguyen
Born 1990 in Washington, DC
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Tuan Andrew Nguyen
Born 1976 in Saigon, Vietnam
Lives in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Raúl de Nieves
Born 1983 in Morelia, Mexico
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Aliza Nisenbaum
Born 1977 in Mexico City, Mexico
Lives in New York, NY

Occupy Museums
(Arthur Polendo, Imani Jacqueline Brown, Kenneth Pietrobono, Noah Fischer, and Tal Beery)
Founded 2011

Pope.L aka William Pope.L
Born 1955 in Newark, NJ
Lives in Chicago, IL

Postcommodity
(Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez, Kade L. Twist)
Founded 2007

Puppies Puppies
Born 1989 in Dallas, TX
Lives in Roswell, NM

Asad Raza
Born 1974 in Buffalo, NY
Lives in New York, NY

Jessi Reaves
Born 1986 in Portland, OR
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

John Riepenhoff
Born 1982 in Milwaukee, WI
Lives in Milwaukee, WI

Chemi Rosado-Seijo
Born 1973 in Vega Alta, PR
Lives in San Juan and Naranjito, PR

Cameron Rowland
Born 1988 in Philadelphia, PA
Lives in Queens, NY

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz
Born 1972 in San Juan, PR
Lives in San Juan, PR

Dana Schutz
Born 1976 in Livonia, MI
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Cauleen Smith
Born 1967 in Riverside, CA
Lives in Chicago, IL

Frances Stark
Born 1967 in Newport Beach, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Maya Stovall
Born 1982 in Detroit, MI
Lives in Detroit, MI

Henry Taylor
Born 1958 in Oxnard, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Torey Thornton
Born 1990 in Macon, GA
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Leslie Thornton and James Richards
Born 1951 in Knoxville, TN; born 1983 in Cardiff, United Kingdom
Lives in Brooklyn, NY; lives in Berlin, Germany and London, United Kingdom

Kaari Upson
Born 1972 in San Bernardino, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Kamasi Washington
Born 1981 in Los Angeles, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Leilah Weinraub
Born 1979 in Los Angeles, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA and New York, NY

Jordan Wolfson
Born 1980 in New York, NY
Lives in New York, NY

Anicka Yi
Born 1971 in Seoul, South Korea
Lives in Queens, NY


EXHIBITION SUPPORT

Whitney Biennial 2017 is presented by

Tiffany & Co.
Major support is provided by

Sothebys

Major support is also provided by The Brown Foundation, Inc. of Houston and the National Committee of the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Significant support is provided by the Philip and Janice Levin Foundation.

Generous support is provided by 2017 Biennial Committee Co-Chairs: Leslie Bluhm, Beth Rudin DeWoody, Bob Gersh, and Miyoung Lee.

Funding is also provided by special Biennial endowments created by Melva Bucksbaum, Emily Fisher Landau, Leonard A. Lauder, and Fern and Lenard Tessler.

Additional support is provided by endowments from The Keith Haring Foundation Exhibition Fund, Donna Perret Rosen and Benjamin M. Rosen, and the Jon and Mary Shirley Foundation.

Curatorial research and travel for this exhibition was funded by an endowment established by Rosina Lee Yue and Bert A. Lies, Jr., MD.


ABOUT THE WHITNEY

The Whitney Museum of American Art, founded in 1930 by the artist and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875–1942), houses the foremost collection of American art from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Mrs. Whitney, an early and ardent supporter of modern American art, nurtured groundbreaking artists at a time when audiences were still largely preoccupied with the Old Masters. From her vision arose the Whitney Museum of American Art, which has been championing the most innovative art of the United States for more than eighty years. The core of the Whitney’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit American art of our time and serve a wide variety of audiences in celebration of the complexity and diversity of art and culture in the United States. Through this mission and a steadfast commitment to artists themselves, the Whitney has long been a powerful force in support of modern and contemporary art and continues to help define what is innovative and influential in American art today.


CURRENT AND UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight
Through January 2, 2017

Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art, 1905–2016
Through February 5, 2017

Virginia Overton: Winter Garden
Through February 5, 2017

Human Interest: Portraits from the Whitney’s Collection
Through February 12, 2017

MPA: RED IN VIEW
Through February 27, 2017

Whitney Biennial
March 17–June 11, 2017

Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium
July 14–October 1, 2017

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World
Fall 2017–Winter 2018

David Wojnarowicz: History Keeps Me Awake at Night
Summer 2018

The Whitney Museum of American Art is located at 99 Gansevoort Street between Washington and West Streets, New York City. Museum hours are: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday from 10:30 am to 6 pm; Friday and Saturday from 10:30 am to 10 pm. Closed Tuesday. Adults: $22 in advance via whitney.org; $25 day of visit. Full-time students and visitors 65 & over: $17 in advance via whitney.org; $18 day of visit. Visitors 18 years & under and Whitney members: FREE. Admission is pay-what-you-wish on Fridays, 7–10 pm. For general information, please call (212) 570-3600 or visit whitney.org.

November 18, 2016 Posted by | CULTURE, FILM, LIFESTYLES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | Leave a comment

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