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Theatre/Profiles: Audelco Award Nominee WALK HARD actress Gabrielle C. Archer

The Audelco Awards are the Independent Black Theatre Awards equivalent to the TONY’S.

On Nov. 21, the 44th Annual Vivian Robinson AUDELCO Recognition Awards for Excellence in Black Theatre will be  given in Neew York City, New York, at Symphony Space.

Vivian Robinson established AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee) as a non-profit membership organization in 1973. At the time, the AUDELCO awards were the only awards ceremony to celebrate the accomplishments of African Americans in the fields of theatre and dance. The principal mission of the AUDELCO Awards is to enhance a comprehension of the arts in African-American communities. The AUDELCO Awards also aim to generate new audiences for non-profit theatre companies and to ensure better public relations.

We had a chance to interview one of the RISING stars, actress Gabrielle C. Archer

headshot

Describe your latest play and your role:

This past Spring I played Ruth in Walk Hard directed by Imani Douglas and written by Abraham Hill, founder of the American Negro Theatre. Ruth is girlfriend to protagonist, Andy Whitman. Andy is a bright but stubborn shine boy turned boxer in Jim Crow New York. The battles inside the ring mirror those outside of it. I believe Ruth to be the moral compass of the play and for Andy. She tries to keep him focused but cool headed & reasonable. She believes power is in organizing. She is part of the nascent movement of unions budding in the late 30s. 

I loved Ruth. She is a strong and powerful woman. A wise and tender soul with whom I nonetheless parted ways in the play’s finale. In my mind, I thought her final words were a bit of a sell out. She speaks of the struggle being that of poor people in general. True words that are a bit All Lives Matter to me. An actor mustn’t judge his character, though, but rather try his best to understand him. Those were my personal feelings, I kept them separate. At the end of the day she was her own kind of warrior and Andy’s rock. 

I was really honored to be part of a team of  much more experienced and talented actors  in a little downtown theatre with a lot of repute with regards to show-casing challenging, subversive, engaging and political pieces. The Metropolitan Playhouse always hosts talk backs after the Sundaymatinees of every run. These talk-backs are enlightening. On our last talk back we had the delightful surprise of having playwright Mr Hill’s family there to exchange ideas and reactions. It’ll always be one of my proudest moment having them express great pleasure at our telling of the story. It was a fun and growing experience all in all.

You have done a lot of theatre work . Is the stage your preferred platform?

I’ve mainly done theatre, yes. I haven’t fully delved into the world of film. I have done a few indies but I do feel more comfortable on stage. By comfortable I by no means mean that I don’t get utterly nervous each time I do a play, but I like the continuity and chronology of stage work. Once you step on that stage there is no turning back -you have to be in every moment till the curtain goes down. Film is very intimate and requires different techniques I must hone. I plan on increasing my experience in that field. 

You notched Shakespeare on your belt in CORIOLANUS. 

Explain the attraction of Shakespeare for actors.

It’s the great frontier. He is a poet, a master of language and story-telling. Shakespearian language is intimidating but beautiful and fun. I’ve always loved language for language itself and anyone who does can appreciate the rhythm, music of Shakespeare’s tales. 

Actors are always training. what are you studying now?

I hadn’t taken a class in far too long (it’s expensive and I figured let me get in there and learn by dong it and doing it with experienced, better actors to keep me on my toes). But acting is a muscle that must constantly be worked out in order not to atrophy. No excuses.

 I got lucky and came upon Alice Spivak through an actor friend of mine. She has been in the industry for a long time and studied with the classic teachers. Her class is very enjoyable and challenging. She is tender and knowledgeable. I am at the moment juggling with 4( soon to be 5) characters ranging from Shakespeare to Chekhov to Neil Simon. It’s great fun being in a class of broad age range and an array of talent from advanced to professional.

How is it? do you have a preferred style or method? what and why? 

Alice bases her teaching on the Stanislavsky technique but strays from it as well. She’s brilliant! Studying your craft is so important but I believe in using tools from all techniques and mixing it up for whatever works for you in a given circumstance. 

The interview continues below…

Metropolitan Playhouse
The American Legacy

220 East Fourth Street ~ New York, New York 10009
Administration: (212) 995 8410  ~  Tickets: (800) 838 3006

A 2007 Company of the Year ~ nytheatre.com

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2015-2016 Season
AUDELCO VIV Award Nominee
Best Revival
“A major rediscovery….a cast that excels.”
Peter Filichia
“An electrifying revival”
– Victor Gluck,
Joshua David Scarlett and Peter Tedeschi
photo: Jacob J. Goldberg Photography

What’s worth the fight?

Walk Hard
by Abram Hill
February 19 – March 20, 2016

A bright young man with quick fists is given the shot to be a champion boxer… if he is willing to accept the racist rules that govern America of the 1930’s.

A play from the co-founder of the
American Negro Theater.

Read More about the play and
The American Negro Theater

Running Time: 2:00

SUNDAY TALKBACKS…following the matinees
February/March 2016
Sun Mon Tues
Weds Thurs Fri Sat
19

7:30 pm

20

7:30 pm

21
3 pm
22

7:30 pm

23 24 25

7:30 pm

26

7:30 pm

27

7:30 pm

28
3 pm
TALK
29 1 2 3

7:30 pm

4

7:30 pm

5

7:30 pm

6
3 pm
TALK
7 8 9
3 pm
10

7:30 pm

11

7:30 pm

12
3 pm
7:30 pm
13
3 pm
TALK
14 15 16
3 pm
17

7:30 pm

18

7:30 pm

19
3 pm
7:30 pm
20
3 pm
TALK
Featuring:
Frank Anderson*
Gabrielle C. Archer
Craig Anthony Bannister*
Michael Basile*
Sean Michael Buckley*
Chris Krause
Beethovan Oden*
Joshua David Scarlett
Vanessa Shaw
Joy Sudduth
Peter Tedeschi*
Kim Yancey-Moore*

Crew:
DIRECTOR Imani
STAGE MANAGER  William Vann Carlton*
LIGHTING Melody Beal
COSTUME  Sidney Fortner
SOUND  Bill Toles
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR  LaVonda Elam

*These actors and stage manager appear courtesy of
Actors Equity Association.
Walk Hard is an AEA Approved Showcase

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Walk Hard

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You are fluent in French and studied at the Sorbonne. What was that experience like?

I used my year abroad to go home for a year and live alone. I studied Literature, Psychology and a bit of Film at the Sorbonne and at Paris X Nanterre University (where my mother went). These schools are polar opposites. The Sorbonne is a prestigious and picturesque school in the heart of Paris whereas Nanterre is a large, more modern public university with little architectural charm on the outskirts of the city. Both are good and have historical value. I enjoyed going from one to the other and learned from each. I preferred Nanterre which had more warmth -in my experience- than the Sorbonne with its intimidating cold marble floors and quiet hallways. The classes there were challenging and mind-titillating. Nanterre was vibrant with more diverse, “on the fringe”, young  minds. 

Paris is just as contrasted and contradictory. You can get lost in the streets of Paris for hours on end…  It is eternally beautiful but within it is a lot of sadness, dissatisfaction, anger and divide. It’s still one of the prettiest places I’ve ever seen. I saw a lot of ugly, but Paris has timeless charm, great food, culture and love of Philosophy*. (*that endless search for truth/knowledge)

You have also directed and recently started in production as well. Does that appeal to you? Why or why not?

I’d like to do more of both. Any production is good, hard team work. We’re all essential pieces of a puzzle. I’m interested in seeing all sides of things. Learning more about every aspect of my industry can only help me in my craft.

Producing is multitasking and problem solving. Developing those skills is interesting to me and will be useful. 

Directing is multi-tasking but it’s more focused. You are painting a picture. As of now, I still have work to do in terms of seeing and creating a Vision. But I can do detail -I’m an actor- so, I’m more of an actor’s director. I know how to speak to my fellow actors in order to bring out what’s needed for the overall picture. There is a language we share, an energy and a deep understanding. I need more notches on my belt to really feel comfortable with the title of director. It was a scary and very fulfilling to manage a 12 person cast under pressure. My mentor at the time would just say, “You have to make a decision. It’s going up.”

That was a great learning experience for me and I can’t wait to get another opportunity to gain more confidence and skill in that realm. 

Describe your training and background.

I’m born in Paris. Left there when I was 7 and came to New York. I went to the French Lycée, graduated with a Literature/Philosophy Baccalaureat. I then attended Amherst College (even kicked it with Lupita!). I then moved back to New York and kind of threw myself into it in a non orthodox way. I started with community theatre in Brooklyn, working with a church-based theatre troupe on a one act play called One Hour 2 Live. It told the story of a young man -a gang recruit- on death row visited by a pastor who wants to reconcile him with his devastating actions. The young man is also visited by his victims. Two of the three victims are acquaintances and I, the third, played a complete stranger. I represented a future cut short as well as the daughter he would have had. The young man is forced to delve into his past and the psychology behind what brought him to this point. It was a very powerful play which we performed throughout the boroughs and New Jersey at middle and high schools, churches, community and family centers etc. We’d have talk backs with the children (and often the boys would go off with the male actors) as well as with community leaders and mothers/family members affected by incarceration and the consequences of gang activity. We even performed at Rikers. (I had mixed feelings about that.) It was a very emotional and (sometimes) fulfilling experience. 

This is people’s real lives- it’s tough. If we were able to reach just one kid in that crowd and inspire them to stay focused, know their worth then it was worth it.  

I did that for four years and then worked an entire year on a play that would be my debut as a young professional actress (Agnes of God). It very abruptly and at the very last minute fell through and that was a painful (even a bit traumatizing) experience. But through it I met my friend and mentor, Leslie Dockery (a broadway vet, dancer, choreographer extraordinaire) and through her I found a whole community of mentors with 30 years of experience under their belt who have embraced me. I’m the baby in the group and have a ways to go. But this vet black theatre community seems to have taken me under their wing and I am blessed to have that support. My journey brought me to Imani Douglas, the Castillo Theatre (which is volunteer based with strong youth community involvement)  and, finally, the Metropolitan Playhouse which is a prestigious little downtown theatre. Simultaneously, in indie film I have found a network of young, ambitious like-minded creators and story-tellers. 

I hope to keep expanding my horizons and make proud all the people who have helped me along the way. I’ve been lucky to have them. 

What does the Audelco nomination mean to you?

The AUDELCO (Audience Development Commitee, Inc.) Recognition Awards or the “Viv Awards” (a wink to founder Vivian Robinson)  honors excellence in the black theatre at professional and non-for-profit levels. It is a pioneer organization, based out of Harlem, that has been around since the 70’s & has awarded many of the greats of the African-American theatre community (such as composer Eubie Blake, choreographer Debbie Allen and even Kerry Washington before Scandal).  It’s like the black Tony Awards! This’ll be my second time going. The first time I went as co-director of a new play Leslie Dockery and I put up at Theatre for The New  City in downtown Manhattan. She was up for Best Choreography and won! That was exciting. She’s been around for a while now and I’m lucky to call her big sister, mentor and friend.

I definitely felt Walk Hard deserved a nod or some recognition because the talent was top-notch and the story is inspiring and quite relevant to today. It was a happy and humbling surprise to find out we were nominated for Best Revival! 

Keeps raising the bar for me which is always the goal and I get to be around and part of yet another piece of Black History.

You come from an illustrious family background. Explain.

Growing up I had the blessing of calling a living piece of history my grand-father or G-daddy -as my sister and I liked to call him. He was our very own piece of World, American and Black History!

My grand-father, Lee Andrew Archer was a Tuskeegee Airman. He was part of the 332nd Fighter Group and became the first black Ace (he shot down 5 enemy fighter aircraft). He flew the “Macon Belle” named after my beautiful grand-mother, Ina, born in Macon, Georgia. He later maintained a career in the US Airforce as a Lieutenant Colonel. After retiring from the military, he became a successful business man and mentor to other successful black business men. In 2004 he received the French Legion of Honor. That was a proud day for us as a family. I remember being there on the coast of Normandy and being thrilled at just how unique and special he was. In 2007 he received the Congressional Medal. At the end of the day, though, he was just our grand-daddy who provided us with a great family foundation and a lucky childhood. We knew how cool he was but naturally, in retrospect and as I get older, I regret not having asked more questions. I just hope to continue to make him proud and share his story and strong legacy. Y parents are also diplomats and writers.

Do you have a specific plan for the future?

I want to venture more into film and work on television eventually. I want to experience what the industry is like in Atlanta and then L.A. I’d love to do a French film. French cinema (especially the New Wave era) has always been inspiring to me. 

Essentially, I want to continue expanding my horizons while working on inspiring projects and telling unique and/or important stories.

Right now I’m working on Miranda –  a film that will bring awareness to domestic abuse. The talent is immense but the funds are limited. If anyone would like to help bring this project to fruition please go to www.gofundme.com/mirandamovie and you can check out director’s previous work at kentsuttton.com. Thanks for the support!

What was your most satisfying performance to you?

I really enjoyed playing “One Dropper” Emma in One Drop a piece by Andrea Fulton set in 1800s Louisiana. It’s based on her family history and tells of an African-American couple who chose to stay in their community and prosper rather than leave and pass. It spoke to me on a very deep level. I particularly liked how beautifully it communicated a part of Black History to children and all ages through original New Orleans music and classical story-telling form.

I think performing for the youth earlier in my career was the most fulfilling for me. Children are our most important and essential resource. To have them come talk to us after each show, just looking to connect, receive advice, inspiration, motivation, recognition, things we all need and deserve, was very rewarding. One Hour 2 Live was a tough play (written by a pastor in Brooklyn tired of counseling those affected by gang violence) but it had a cathartic effect on who needed it. I’ll never forget the one time a young woman cried out in the middle of the play and had to be escorted out. That was difficult, staying in character during that moment. I hope we didn’t hurt her heart but rather opened it because she felt heard, noticed and cared for. I’ll also always remember a little boy -one of many- standing up after a performance and vowing unprompted to choose his friends wisely and focus on being his best self. Hearing the youth speak -express themselves so intelligently- while surrounded by a caring community of mothers, parents and teachers was the most satisfying. 

What would you like your legacy to be?

I want to stay true to myself – my complicated, imperfect self- tell stories from all walks of life (the good, the bad, the beautiful and the ugly) so we can stop judging each other and see our common humanity.

I’d like to make my grand-daddy proud. Keep telling important stories but also have fun. 

I want to reach children and inspire them. I want to spread love, warmth, self-worth and respect for our elders, our history, our ancestry, what brought us all to this point as we look forward and live our biggest life. 

I’m not literate enough in the history of Black Theatre to give much of an opinion except that I am so happy and proud that its legacy is being so wonderfully upheld. Black theaters such as the National Black Theatre, based in ever-changing Harlem, are still up and kicking and need our continued support. Brilliant talents like Danai Gurira who are telling stories never told on Broadway and opening eyes so eloquently are very motivating!

Playing Salome was fun. She is the ultimate femme fatale but she is also a child. The role was divided in two and I played her innocent side -which wasn’t quite as appealing to me. I nonetheless enjoyed delving into the Old World and using elevated almost Shakespearian language. 

My advice to newcomers would be study, work and surround yourself with ambitious people. Find mentors to help guide you. Creating a strong reel and having a strong headshot is also essential. 

Thank You, Ms. Archer!

The AUDELCO AWARDS will be presented November 21, 2016 in New York City

Walk Hard
by Abram Hill

co-founder of the American Negro Theater

 Walk Hard

Joshua David Scarlett
photo: Alex Roe

What’s worth fighting for?

February 19 – March 20, 2016

 METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE
220 E 4th Street
New York, NY

800 838 3006

 

Previews Begin
Friday, February 19th

Opening Night
Friday, February 26th
Performance and Reception
7:30 pm

Performances through March 20th

From 1944

Working as a shoeshine boy in 1939, nineteen-year-old Andy Whitman’s ambition is limited only by the color of his skin.
Bright, industrious, and black, his daily struggle makes make him quick with his temper and his fists.
When he catches the eye of a boxing manager in a street fight, Andy is soon a rising star in a fast-paced game.
But it is a game of devil’s bargains, played with dubious partners, and some rules never change when a black man looks for respect in a white world.

We are delighted to revive this remarkable drama as part of our 24th Season,
The Season of Hope.

 

METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE
220 E 4th Street
New York, NY

Walk Hard

February 19th – March 20th, 2016

Thursdays – Saturdays at 7:30 pm
Sundays at 3 pm

PLUS
Pay What You Will: Monday, 2/22 at 7:30pm
Added Matinees: Wednesdays (3/9 & 3/16) Saturdays (3/12 & 12/19) at 3pm

Talkbacks after Sunday matinées.

 

*These actors appear courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association.
Walk Hard
is an AEA Approved Showcase

AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee, Inc.)

The AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee, Inc.) is an organization that acknowledges and honors Black Theatre and its artists in New York City. Established and incorporated in 1973 by the late Vivian Robinson, to stimulate interest in and support of performing arts in black communities.

AUDELCO Recognition Awards – The annual Vivian Robinson/AUDELCO Recognition, “The VIV”Awards are the only formally established awards presented to the black theatre community.  Every third Monday in November the nominees are awarded in various categories.

 

 

 

2016 Nominees

LIGHTING DESIGN
Alan C. Edwards (Macbeth)
Nathan Hawkins/William Kenyon (Blood at the Root)
Tyler Micoleau (Familiar)
Austin R. Smith (The Royale)
Thom Weaver (The Total Bent)

SET DESIGN
Michael Carnahan (Skeleton Crew)
Maruti Evans (Dead and Breathing)
G.W. Mercier (Head of Passes)
Clint Ramos (Familiar)
Daniel Robinson (The First Noel)

COSTUME DESIGN
Dede M. Ayite (The Royale)
Gabriel Berry (The Total Bent)
Rachel Dozier-Ezell (Macbeth)
Susan Hilferty (Familiar)
Toni-Leslie James (Head of Passes)

SOUND DESIGN
Obadiah Eaves/Sten Severson (The Total Bent)
Rob Kaplowitz (Skeleton Crew)
John McKenna (Macbeth)
Liz Sokolak (Blood at the Root)
Darron L. West (Familiar)

DIRECTOR/DRAMATIC PRODUCTION
Carl Cofield (Macbeth)
Kenny Leon (Smart People)
Jonathan McCrory (Dead and Breathing)
Ruben Santiago-Hudson (Skeleton Crew)
Liesl Tommy (Eclipsed)

DIRECTOR/MUSICAL PRODUCTION
Steve H. Broadnax III (The First Noel)
Jeff Calhoun (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
Angie Kristic (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Joanna Settle (The Total Bent)

PLAYWRIGHT
Lydia Diamond (Smart People)
Colman Domingo (Dot)
Danai Gurira (Familiar)
Chisa Hutchinson (Dead and Breathing)
Dominique Morisseau (Skeleton Crew)
Marco Ramirez (The Royale)

SUPPORTING ACTOR
Francois Battiste (Head of Passes)
Jason Dirden (Skeleton Crew)
Michael Potts (Mother Courage and Her Children)
Larry Powell (The Christians)
David Roberts (The Fall of the Kings)
Kim Sullivan (The Piano Lesson)

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Ito Aghayere (Familiar)
Alana Arenas (Head of Passes)
Vinie Burrows (I Will Look Forward to This Later)
Montego Glover (The Royale)
Nikiya Mathis (Skeleton Crew)
Linda Powell (The Christians)
Myra Lucretia Taylor (Familiar)

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN A MUSICAL – FEMALE
Tina Fabrique (The First Noel)
Ashley Ware Jenkins (The First Noel)
Traci Michelle (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN A MUSICAL – MALE
Ato Blankson-Wood (The Total Bent)
Isaac Gay (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Vondie Curtis Hall (The Total Bent)
Maurice Hines (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
CB Murray (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Nathaniel Stampley (The First Noel)

CHOREOGRAPHY
Brian Harlan Brooks (The First Noel)
Maurice Hines (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
David Neumann (The Total Bent)
Tiffany Rea-Fisher (Macbeth)
Kyndra “Binkie” Reevey (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)

OUTSTANDING ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE
A Lovely Malfunction (Negro Ensemble Company)
Barbecue (The Public Theater)
but I cld only whisper (The Flea)
Dead and Breathing (National Black Theatre)
Eclipsed (The Public Theater)
Proof (Quick Silver Theatre/Classics in Color Theatre Co.)
Timeless: The Mystery of the Dark Water (Black Spectrum Theatre)

SOLO PERFORMANCE
Trezana Beverley (Mabel Madness)
Staceyann Chin (Motherstruck!)
Cherie Danielle (The Diary of An Afro Goddess)
Tommie J. Moore (Dare to Be Black: The Jack Johnson Story)
Khalil Muhammad (Pryor Truth)
Reginald L. Wilson (Sugar Ray)

LEAD ACTOR
Mahershala Ali (Smart People)
Khris Davis (The Royale)
RJ Foster (Richard III)
Wendell B. Franklin (Skeleton Crew)
Joe Morton (Turn Me Loose)
Jahi Kassa Taquara (The Piano Lesson)

LEAD ACTRESS
Lynda Gravatt (Skeleton Crew)
Marjorie Johnson (Dot)
Kecia Lewis (Mother Courage and Her Children)
Phylicia Rashad (Head of Passes)
Tessa Thompson (Smart People)
Tamara Tunie (Familiar)

BEST REVIVAL
In the Heights (Harlem Repertory Theatre)
In White America (New Federal Theatre)
Macbeth (Classical Theatre of Harlem)
Mother Courage and Her Children (Classic Stage Company)
Proof (Quick Silver Theatre/Classics in Color Theatre Co.)
The Piano Lesson (Gallery Players)
Walk Hard (Metropolitan Playhouse)

MUSICAL PRODUCTION OF THE YEAR
Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse (La Mama)
Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life (New World Stages)
The First Noel (Classical Theatre of Harlem)
The Total Bent (The Public Theater)

DRAMATIC PRODUCTION OF THE YEAR
Dead and Breathing (National Black Theatre)
Dot (Vineyard Theatre)
Familiar (Playwrights Horizons)
Skeleton Crew (Atlantic Theater Company)
Smart People (Second Stage Theatre).
The Royale (Lincoln Center Theater)

 

As a “Friend of AUDELCO,” you receive discounts to some of your favorite Off and Off-Off Broadway theatres when you attend theatre and dance productions.

AUDELCO, Inc. activities include:

Networking – Contacting and developing relationships with individuals, local groups, churches, and other organizations to introduce new audiences to non-profit performing arts.

AUDELCO Recognition Awards – The annual Vivian Robinson/AUDELCO Recognition, “The VIV”Awards are the only formally established awards presented to the black theatre community.  Every third Monday in November the nominees are awarded in various categories.

Theatre for the Future:Young Audiences Series – Addresses the need for positive cultural experiences for children between the ages of 10-17.  This series provides entertainment and cultural experience for the youth.  This series provides entertainment and cultural enrichment in non-academic settings such as: outdoor activities during Harlem Week; Saturday matinees during Black Arts Festival; Holiday celebrations in December, and performances during Black History Month.

Black Theatre Archives – A collection of books, tapes, original scripts, costumes and set designs, photographs, playbills and extensive clippings on current theatre groups and activities.

Publications-“INTERMISSION”, AUDELCO‘s newsletter is published quarterly to stimulate interest in the performing arts.  The “OVERTURE”, a black theatre magazine that is published to document exciting work done by Black theatre artists.

Seminars, Lectures, and Forums- Addresses the general awareness about the contributions of Blacks in the cultural and socio-economic environment.

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November 18, 2016 - Posted by | ART, avant-garde, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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