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WORLD SCIENCE FESTIVAL –5/28-6/1, NYC, various locations

This is BIG! Big Science! Huge leaps in human understanding of scientific breakthroughs explained simply and elegantly. Come understand your body, your world, our universe.

 

find more info here: http://worldsciencefestival.com/events?/wsf2014

 

world science festival

2014 Presale Festival Events

Many more programs and participants will be added over the coming days, and we’ll be making all programs available to the general public at noon on Thursday, May 1, so don’t delay. Tickets go fast!

The World Science Festival returns to New York City on May 28 through June 1st, for an extraordinary celebration of science. Join some of the world’s leading thinkers to explore science through discussion, debate, theatre, art, culinary delights, and much more. Below are the programs available right now, only for Festival supporters with a presale code. To get yours, just sign up for our WSF newsletter here.

 

Go to: Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday Show: Full Entries | Agenda View

Thursday


  • 2014 Kavli Prizes

    Richard Besser, Alan Alda, Brian Greene, Eric Kandel, Ann Graybiel, Martin Rees Thursday, May 29, 2014 8:00 AM – 10:00 AM Grand Hall, NYU Global CenterThe prestigious biennial Kavli Prizes recognize scientists for major advances in three research areas: astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience—the big, the small and the complex. The 2014 winners, sharing a $1 million award in each field, will be announced via live satellite from the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters in Oslo. The opening conversation, in tribute to the extraordinary philanthropist, the late Fred Kavli, will feature Alan Alda, Brian Greene and Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel.  Following the announcement of the winners, three renowned scientists—nanoscientist Paul Weiss, neuroscientist and Kavli Laureate Ann Graybiel and astrophysicist Lord Martin Rees—will join ABC News’ chief health and medical editor Richard Besser for a discussion of the scientific achievements of the Kavli Laureates and provide commentary on the next wave of research and opportunities within these dynamic fields.

     

    Invitation Only | More Info »


  • Pioneers in Science: Martin Rees

    Martin Rees Thursday, May 29, 2014 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM Colloquium Room, NYU Global CenterGreat minds inspire greatness in others, which is why the Pioneers in Science program gives high school students from around the globe rare access to some of the world’s most renowned scientists. This year, students will engage with British astrophysicist, Lord Martin Rees. Now the prestigious Astronomer Royal, Rees has worked on everything from black holes and quasars to quantum physics and the Big Bang. During this intimate gathering, he’ll share his personal stories, life challenges, and career highlights, all toward inspiring the next generation of scientists and explorers.

     

    Invitation Only | More Info »


  • Science and Story: The Write Angle

    John Hockenberry, Sean Carroll, Jo Marchant, Steven Pinker Thursday, May 29, 2014 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM The Great Hall, Cooper UnionDoing science? Hard work. Explaining the results to an interested but scientifically untrained public? Just as difficult. And just as important. Join a conversation with Sean Carroll, Jo Marchant, and Steven Pinker to discuss the responsibilities and challenges science writers face when leading the uninitiated into worlds filled with equations, data, minutiae, and long histories of incrementally compiled knowledge. What are the most effective and creative ways for making complex ideas compelling and accessible, without compromising their intellectual integrity?
    This program is supported by The Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books.

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • It’s All Relatives: The Science of Your Family Tree

    Catherine Ball, Mark D. Shriver, CeCe Moore Thursday, May 29, 2014 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM New-York Historical SocietyResearching the farthest branches of your family tree is now faster, cheaper, more accessible and more accurate than ever before. Today you can find distant living relatives, learn how you are related to important historical figures or discover how your ancestors participated in major movements in human history.  And, using advanced technologies to analyze face structure and skin pigmentation, evolutionary geneticists can determine what your ancestors actually looked like.  Join a conversation among leading researchers about how gains in computational power, together with technological innovations, are allowing scientists to come ever closer to understanding how we are all connected.
    This program is produced in collaboration with The New-York Historical Society.

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • Cells to Silicon: Your Brain in 2050

    Gary Marcus, Sheila Nirenberg, John Donoghue, Michel M. Maharbiz Thursday, May 29, 2014 8:00 PM – 9:30 PM The Kaye Playhouse at Hunter CollegeWe are at the dawn of a revolution in neuroscience, with the potential to dramatically expand how the human mind interacts with the world. For the most part,  brains still need bodies—vocal cords, hands, eyes—to turn thought into action, but rudimentary mind-to-machine links have already been developed. The science fiction dream of uploading new skills and memories directly to your mind, might not be far off. Drawing from neuroscience, biology, engineering, genetics, and psychology, we will explore the breakthroughs happening in brain-machine interaction today, and speculate about the enhanced human capabilities of tomorrow.
    This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • Measure for Measure: Quantum Physics and Reality

    Brian Greene, David Z. Albert, Sheldon Goldstein, Sean Carroll Thursday, May 29, 2014 8:00 PM – 9:30 PM NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts Throw a baseball and you can track its arc across the sky without disturbing it. Scientists don’t have that luxury with quantum particles. When no one is looking, a particle has near limitless potential: it can be nearly anywhere. But measure it, and the particle snaps to one position. This transition from the fuzzy quantum world to the sharp reality of common experience is as vital as it is controversial. How do objects shed their quantum weirdness when measured? Join a debate of current theories, including tales of infinite universes where anything and everything happens.
    This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

    Buy Tickets | More Info »

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Friday


  • Pioneers in Science: John Grunsfeld

    John M. Grunsfeld Friday, May 30, 2014 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM Colloquium Room, NYU Global CenterGreat minds inspire greatness in others, which is why the Pioneers in Science program gives high school students from around the globe rare access to some of the world’s most renowned scientists. This year, students will engage with NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld, veteran of five space shuttle flights and multiple spacewalks. Grunsfeld helped repair the Hubble Space Telescope and until recently managed the science program for the James Webb Space Telescope. During this intimate gathering, he’ll share his personal stories, life challenges, and career highlights, all toward inspiring the next generation of scientists and explorers.

     

    Invitation Only | More Info »


  • Particle Fever: The Higgs and Beyond

    David Kaplan, Nima Arkani-Hamed, Claudia Raschke-Robinson Friday, May 30, 2014 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM Museum of the Moving ImageImagine being able to watch as Edison turned on the first light bulb, or as Franklin received his first jolt of electricity. Here’s a film gives that give you a front-row seat on one of the most important scientific discoveries of our age: the successful search for the elusive Higgs boson, the final particle to complete the Standard Model of Particle Physics. This inspiring and award-winning documentary follows a handful of the 10,000 scientists who collaborated on the biggest and most expensive scientific experiment in history. After the screening, there will be a live discussion with several of the scientists and filmmakers involved in Particle Fever.
    This program is supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation as part of its Public Understanding of Science and Technology Initiative.
    This program is presented in collaboration with The Museum of the Moving Image.

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • Ripples from the Big Bang: Listening to the Beginning of Time

    Brian Greene, John Kovac, Alan Guth, Andrei Linde, Paul Steinhardt, Amber Miller Friday, May 30, 2014 8:00 PM – 9:30 PM NYU Skirball Center for the Performing ArtsIn March, a major breakthrough in understanding the origin of universe took the scientific community—and the general public—by storm. A team lead by astronomer John Kovac, using a powerful telescope at the South Pole, reported evidence of ripples in the fabric of spacetime produced by the big bang, a long-sought prediction of our most refined approach to cosmology, the inflationary theory. Amidst the worldwide celebration, though, some have been quietly suggesting that the champagne has been uncorked prematurely. Join a singular conversation, among the world’s most respected pioneers in cosmological theory and observation, that will explore the state of the art in the ongoing quest to understand the beginning of the universe.

     

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • Designer Genes: Fashioning our Biological Future

    George M. Church, Jamie A. Grifo, Nita A. Farahany, Paula Amato, Sheldon Krimsky Friday, May 30, 2014 8:00 PM – 9:30 PM The Kaye Playhouse at Hunter CollegePerhaps the most complicated code in the universe is the one sitting inside our cells, written in DNA. More than three billion letters make up the human genome, giving geneticists plenty to explore…and explore they have. But even as gene therapy, DNA analysis, and genetically modified organisms enter the mainstream—and inspire national debate—our capacity to manipulate life continues to deepen. How far should we go? Are there hidden downsides to rewriting our DNA? Can we hijack evolution and put an end to genetic diseases, or engineer the next generation to have advantageous traits? And who gets to decide?
    This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

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Saturday


  • On the Shoulders of Giants

    Mary-Claire King Saturday, May 31, 2014 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM Grand Hall, NYU Global Center Scientists rely on the revelations and discoveries of previous generations. Indeed, it was Isaac Newton who humbly offered that “if he had seen a little further than others, it was by standing on the shoulders of giants.” This year, we continue our special series that invites our audience to stand on the shoulders of modern-day titans, with a speech by geneticist Mary-Claire King. A role model for female scientists, King discovered the breast cancer gene that revolutionized treatment, is a pioneer who first demonstrated the remarkable genetic overlap between humans and chimpanzees, and is an activist who used DNA analysis to reunite war-torn kidnapped children with their families. Come and hear this most remarkable scientist, whose positive impact will be felt for ages to come.

     

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • Better, Stronger, Faster: The Future of the Bionic Body

    John Donoghue, P. Hunter Peckham, Jennifer French, Joseph J. Fins Saturday, May 31, 2014 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM The Kaye Playhouse at Hunter CollegeThe deaf begin to hear. The blind begin to see. Once damaged hearts begin to pump blood. Forget “wearable tech”—we’ve entered a zone where deploying engineering and circuitry inside the human body can help erase disabilities and, more controversially, enhance human capacities beyond their evolutionary limits. Peek into a future where technology will have the capacity to make us stronger, faster and by some measures, better.
    This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • Scientific Kitchen: Butter Lab

    Kent Kirshenbaum, David Grier, Michael Laiskonis Saturday, May 31, 2014 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM NYU Silver Center – Chemistry LabIn this comprehensive guide to the science of butter and all its variations, you’ll discover how fat globules, foam, and plasma are essential to the process of making this complex, delicious spread. Examine this soft matter physics phenomenon through NYU professor David Grier’s video microscope. Ask NYU chemist Kent Kirshenbaum why butter that has been fermenting in the ground for a year (or a lifetime) is considered a delicacy. And taste the best and most delicious ways to manipulate and use it thanks to pastry chef and ICE creative director, Michael Laiskonis. You’ll leave with your own handmade butter and an understanding of how and why that happened.
    This program is part of the Scientific Kitchen Series – Intimate, hands-on, food-meets-science workshops behind the scenes at New York’s most exclusive kitchens and laboratories.

    Sold Out | More Info » This program is sold out, but additional tickets may become available. If you would like to join the waiting list, please sign up here.


  • Scientific Kitchen: Botany at the Bar

    Rachel Meyer, Selena Ahmed, Kevin Denton Saturday, May 31, 2014 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM NYU Center for Genomics and Systems BiologyExplore the complex and often misunderstood world of botany in a new and delicious way.  Follow the scientists of Shoots and Roots on a botanical journey via hand-crafted bitters that showcase plants from biodiversity hotspots around the globe.  Use your newfound knowledge along with modern tools and techniques to craft your own high-quality, unique extractions from Earth’s most exotic plants.  Enjoy a sensory experience of science enhanced by the vaporized, carbonated and artfully crafted cocktails of Kevin Denton from wd~50 and Alder.  Finish with an insider’s peek at the greenhouse above the lab, concluding an evening that’s a beautiful melding of botany and booze.
    This program is part of the Scientific Kitchen Series – Intimate, hands-on, food-meets-science workshops behind the scenes at New York’s most exclusive kitchens and laboratories.

    Sold Out | More Info » This program is sold out, but additional tickets may become available. If you would like to join the waiting list, please sign up here.


  • Alien Life: Will We Know It When We See It?

    Dimitar Sasselov, Jack W. Szostak, Sara Seager, Paul Davies Saturday, May 31, 2014 8:00 PM – 9:30 PM NYU Skirball Center for the Performing ArtsAre we alone in the universe? Scientists haven’t found aliens yet, but by scanning the sky they’ve shown that our galaxy harbors billions of planets, many of which likely have conditions similar to those on Earth. Which brings new questions into sharp relief: When searching for life beyond our home planet, how do we know what to look for? What human prejudices might cause us to overlook intelligent life forms very different from what we expect? Learn how scientists across disciplines—astronomers, chemists and microbiologists—are intensely studying the evolution of life on Earth to help identify life abroad, a research agenda with wide-reaching ramifications for science, philosophy, religion, and much more.
    This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • The Craving Brain: The Neuroscience of Uncontrollable Urges

    Elizabeth Vargas, Nora D. Volkow, Kim D. Janda, Eric Nestler, Amir Levine Saturday, May 31, 2014 8:00 PM – 9:30 PM The Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College  Counseling . . . therapy . . . self-control. The path to curing addiction has never been easy. Addiction short-circuits the brain’s reward system, releasing dopamine and other feel-good chemicals that keep you coming back for more. But through a steadily developing understanding of the brain, scientists foresee a future in which a simple medical procedure—even a shot or a pill—could defuse addiction’s power.  Join leading researchers studying how addiction changes the very fabric of the brain, and what new insights could mean for addicts trying to win back their lives.
    This program is part of “The Big, the Small, and the Complex,” a series exploring the latest developments in Astrophysics, Nanoscience, and Neuroscience—fields recognized by The Kavli Prize.

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • The Night Sky from Brooklyn Bridge Park

    Bobak Ferdowsi, Mario Livio Saturday, May 31, 2014 9:00 PM Brooklyn Bridge Park  Get out your telescope (or come borrow one of ours) for a night of urban stargazing and live music as we celebrate the dance of the planets. Learn even more about the universe at our Star Chat, where some of the world’s best astronomers, physicists, and scientists will discuss hunting for life, landing crafts on Mars, and discovering planets trillions and trillions of miles away. Gear up for the Rosetta Mission that is slated to land on a comet later this year by visiting our model comet with interactive programming. Finally, get a taste of what it’s like to be an exoplanet hunter with NASA’s interactive game, The Hidden Light, and enjoy finding your favorite constellations without ever leaving the city.

     

    Free Admission | More Info »

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Sunday


  • The Ultimate Science Street Fair

    Bobak Ferdowsi, Michael S. Hopkins, Michael J. Massimino, and many others Sunday, June 1, 2014 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM Washington Square ParkGames, performances, interactive experiments, and the great outdoors combine for a full-day science extravaganza at the seventh annual World Science Festival Street Fair. Installations and activities from more than 50 organizations will focus on our three themes: space, weather, and robots.

     

    Free Admission | More Info »


  • Cool Jobs

    Mark Siddall, Michael J. Massimino, Hannah Morris, Becca Peixotto, Chad Jenkins Sunday, June 1, 2014 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts  Imagine exploring the Amazon river to dig up a rare breed of leeches, or heading into space to repair the famed Hubble Space Telescope, or crawling through a tiny crevice in the Earth in search of remains of our earliest ancestors. Well, you don’t have to just imagine these spectacular feats. The World Science Festival has assembled the coolest group of scientists with the most interesting jobs on the planet, who’ll tell you first hand about these explorations and much more. Join us to start your own quest to find a Cool Job in science.

     

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • The Deceptive Watchman: Mind, Brain and Time

    John Hockenberry, David Eagleman, Dean Buonomano, Kia Nobre Sunday, June 1, 2014 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM The Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College  The first minute of a roller coaster ride and the ninety-seventh minute in line at the DMV don’t seem to pass at quite the same rate. While our watches show time ticking forward at a uniform pace, the experience of time is anything but. Time is relative—not just in an Einsteinian way—but because the brain colors and shades the passage of time. Through an interdisciplinary discussion among some of the worlds leading researchers, explore the human experience of time, including the fascinating relationship between memory and reality, and the chemical and electrical impulses of the brain that drive the experience.
    This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

     

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • What is Color?

    Alan Alda, Bevil Conway, Jay Neitz, Kaitlyn Hova, David Eagleman Sunday, June 1, 2014 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM NYU Skirball Center for the Performing ArtsHow do you see colors, and do they look the same to everyone? It’s not an easy question. Most human eyes can see around 10 million different colors, but our eyes can’t see other spectra of light that many insects, birds, and fish can see. Some colors even look different when your brain compares them to other colors, something painters such as Monet and Matisse took advantage of.  And some people, synesthetes, can invent colors to go along with words, numbers, or even music. In an action-packed hour, our audience and experts will delve into the world of color. It all leads up to a dazzling sound and light show, helping us see the colors a young synesthete has in her head when she rocks out on the electric violin.
    This program is in association with the Flame Challenge, an annual contest held by The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University.

    Buy Tickets | More Info »


  • Go Figure: Predicting the World with Math

    James Fowler, Steven Strogatz, Seth Lloyd, Andrew W. Lo Sunday, June 1, 2014 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM The Kaye Playhouse at Hunter CollegeAlgorithms are the unsung heroes of everything from fighting crime and searching the world’s information to selecting movies and even choosing mates. These complex digital decision-making mechanisms mine mountains of data to make predictions for, well, nearly anything. And analysts thus armed are revealing unexpected connections between widely disparate systems. Join an exploration of the surprising predictive power of math, and probe the theoretical limits of even the most promising computers of tomorrow. We’re tackling ever more complex problems-but are there some problems simply beyond the reach of machines?
    This program is part of the Big Ideas Series.

    Buy Tickets | More Info »

 

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