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CARRIE MAE WEEMS in January! The Museum Series 1/30-6/29 @ Studio Museum in Harlem and Three Decades of Photography and Video 1/24-5/14 @ The Guggenheim Museum

Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series

The Studio Museum in Harlem is pleased to announce the Winter 2014 exhibition, Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series, on view January 30–June 29, 2014. The exhibition comprises selections from Weems’s ongoing series of self-portraits, where she stands, with her back turned to the camera, in proximity to some of the world’s leading museums and cultural institutions. The resulting images act as ruminations on the collecting and exhibiting practices of these sites.

Since 1978, Weems (b. 1953, Portland, Oregon) has examined the historical complexities of identity, class and social relations through photography and other media, such as video, installation, sound and text.

Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series is organized by Lauren Haynes, assistant curator. The exhibition runs concurrently with Weems’s mid-career retrospective, organized by the Frist Center for Visual Arts in Nashville, on view at the Guggenheim Museum from January 24 – May 14, 2014.

The Studio Museum in Harlem is pleased to announce the

Winter 2014 exhibition,
Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series, on view
January 30–June 29,2014.
The exhibition comprises selections from Weems’s ongoing series of self-portraits, where she
stands, with her back turned to the camera, in proximity to some of the world’s leading museums and
cultural institutions. The resulting images act as ruminations on the collecting and exhibiting practices
of these sites.
Since 1978, Weems (b. 1953, Portland, Oregon) has examined the historical complexities of
identity, class and social relations through photography and other media, such as video, installation,
sound and text. Working in series, her generally black-and-white photographs articulate and reify the
African-American experience in particular for broad contemplation. Varying from intimate to sweeping
in scale, Weems’s diverse oeuvre reflects the artist’s commitment to revealing inequalities that
potentially touch upon all segments of humanity.
Carrie Mae Weems,
Project Row Houses
(from “The Museum Series”) (detail), 2006–present. Digital chromogenic print, 72 × 60 inches.
Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

“The Museum Series” (2006–present) shows Weems, shrouded in black, traveling to domestic
locations, such as the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Project Row Houses in Houston, as well as
outside of the United States to the Tate Modern, London; the Pergamon Museum in Berlin; and the
Galleria Nazionale D’Arte Moderna in Rome. The images are complicated by her position as an
artist in relationship to these institutions as well as by the constellation of race and gender inequality,
agency and access that surround them. Implicated in each photograph by virtue of size and physical
position, the viewer is asked to question the manner by which cultural institutions affirm or reject
certain histories through their collecting and display decisions.
Weems was born in Portland, Oregon, in 1953. She earned a BFA from the California Institute
of the Arts, Valencia (1981), and an MFA in photography from the University of California, San Diego
(1984), continuing her studies in the Graduate Program in Folklore at the University of California,
Berkeley (1984-1987). She is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, including Rome
Prize Fellowship (2006); Skowhegan Medal for Photography (2007). In 2012, Weems received a
Medal of Arts from the U.S. Department of State and in 2013 she was the recipient of a Lifetime
Achievement Award from the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. Weems was named a 2013
MacArthur Fellow. The artist lives and works in Syracuse, New York.
Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series
is organized by
Lauren Haynes, assistant curator
and runs concurrently with Weems’s mid-career retrospective, on view at the Guggenheim Museum
from January 24 – May 14, 2014.
Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video
was organized by the Frist Center for Visual Arts in Nashville and has traveled to the Portland Art Museum,
The Cleveland Museum of Art and the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University

CMW MotherDaughter 490

Guggenheim Museum Presents Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video


First New York Museum Retrospective for 2013 MacArthur Award-Winning Artist

Exhibition:                  Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video
Venue:                       Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Location:                    Annex Levels 2 and 4; Monitor 4; Thannhauser 4; New Media Theater
Dates:                        January 24–May 14, 2014
In January 2014, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video, the first major New York museum retrospective devoted to this socially motivated artist. Weems has long been acclaimed as one of the most eloquent and respected interpreters of African American experiences, and she continues to be an important influence for many young artists today. Featuring more than 120 works—primarily photographs, but also texts, videos, and an audio recording—as well as a range of related educational programs, this comprehensive survey offers an opportunity to experience the full breadth of the artist’s oeuvre and gain new insight into her practice.

Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video is organized by the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, Tennessee. The exhibition has been curated by Kathryn Delmez, the Frist Center, where it opened in September 2012. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presentation is organized by Jennifer Blessing, Senior Curator, Photography, with Susan Thompson, Assistant Curator. This exhibition is supported in part by The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The Leadership Committee for Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video is also gratefully acknowledged for its support, including Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Robert Menschel Vital Projects, and Jack Shainman Gallery, as well as Henry Buhl, Crystal R. McCrary and Raymond J. McGuire, Beth Rudin DeWoody, and Toby Devan Lewis. Additional funding is provided by the William Talbott Hillman Foundation.

The work of Carrie Mae Weems (b. 1953, Portland, Oregon) invites contemplation of issues surrounding race, gender, and class inequality. Over the past thirty years, Weems has used her art to bring to light the ignored or erased experiences of marginalized people. Her work proposes a multidimensional picture of history and humanity, intended to spur greater cultural awareness and compassion. Although her subjects are often African American, Weems wants “people of color to stand for the human multitudes” and for her art to resonate with audiences of all backgrounds.

Organized in a loosely chronological order throughout two of the museum’s Annex Levels, the exhibition begins on Level 2 with the series Family Pictures and Stories (1978–84). This series, like many of Weems’s early works, explores matters relating to contemporary black identity, highlighting individuals in social contexts—including in this case her own kin. Her landmark Kitchen Table Series (1990) employs text and photography to explore the range of women’s roles within a community, pointedly situating the photographs’ subject within a domestic setting. Selections from Weems’s Sea Islands Series (1991–92), Africa (1993), and Slave Coast (1993) demonstrate her ongoing interest in language and storytelling. These works, made during the artist’s travels to the titular locales, pair images with evocative vernacular texts or etymological investigations that trace English words to African roots. The artist’s practice emphasizes the role of both spoken and written narrative, reflecting her graduate studies in folklore.

Weems often appropriates words and images, re-presenting them to viewers as biting reminders of the persistence of bigoted attitudes in the United States. Her renowned series From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried (1995-96), presented on Annex Level 4, layers new text over found historical imagery to critique and lament prejudiced attitudes toward African Americans throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. A yearning to investigate the underlying causes and effects of racism, slavery, and imperialism has spurred Weems to travel widely throughout the United States, Africa, Europe, and the Caribbean. During extended visits to these places, depicted in series such as Dreaming in Cuba (2002), The Louisiana Project (2003), and Roaming (2006), all represented in the exhibition, she looks to the surrounding land and architecture in order to foster communion with inhabitants past and present.

Video is a natural extension of Weems’s narrative photographic practice, also providing an opportunity for the artist to include music in her work. Although she worked in film during her undergraduate years at the California Institute of the Arts, Weems’s first major endeavor in the medium came in 2003–04 with Coming Up for Air, a work comprised of series of poetic vignettes that will be screened in the New Media Theater in the Guggenheim’s Sackler Center for Arts Education. Other video works, including Italian Dreams (2006), Afro Chic (2009), and Constructing History: A Requiem to Mark the Moment (2008) will be integrated into the exhibition near related photographs.

Exhibition Catalogue
The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated catalogue, published by Yale University Press. The catalogue includes a foreword by Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director, W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University, and scholarly essays by Kathryn Delmez, Curator, Frist Center for the Visual Arts; Franklin Sirmans, Terri and Michael Smooke Curator of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Robert Storr, Dean, Yale University School of Art; and Deborah Willis, Professor of Photography and Imaging, Tisch School for the Arts, New York University. It will be available for $50 at guggenheimstore.org.

Education and Public Programs
A range of public programs will be presented in conjunction with Carrie Mae Weems, with details to be posted at guggenheim.org/publicprograms. Highlights include:

Carrie Mae Weems: Live from the Guggenheim
April 25, 26, 27
Carrie Mae Weems hosts an all-star cast of musicians, artists, activists, writers, and other celebrated guests in a series of museum sessions drawn from the inspirational context of Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video. This multidisciplinary performance salon will embody issues of identity, politics, narrative, and history that Weems engages in her work. Tickets and more information will soon be available on guggenheim.org/calendar

Exhibition Video
January 24–May 14
Mon–Wed, Fri, Sun, 1 pm and 3 pm
Weem’s Coming Up for Air (2003–04) features a series of unrelated yet linked vignettes that examine human relationships, including those between black men and white women in antebellum New Orleans, quarreling sisters hoping for reconciliation, a child and an adored father, and young idealistic lovers (suggestive of Winnie and Nelson Mandela) before a loss of innocence. The film will be screened in the New Media Theater in the museum’s Sackler Center for Arts Education. Free with museum admission.

Curator’s Eye Tours
Friday, February 7, 2 pm: Jennifer Blessing
Friday, March 14, 2 pm: Susan Thompson
Free with museum admission

About Carrie Mae Weems
Born in Portland, Oregon in 1953, Weems earned an MFA from the University of California, San Diego in 1984. Weems has been featured in solo exhibitions organized by institutions including the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (1991); New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (1991); National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC (1993); Museum of Modern Art, New York (1995); Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris, New York (1998); Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, MA (2000); and Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporaneo, Seville (2010). Weems’s work has also been included in several important international exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial (1991); Black Male, Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary American Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1994); 2nd Johannesburg Biennale, Africus Institute of Contemporary Art, Johannesburg, South Africa (1997); Only Skin Deep: Changing Visions of the American Self, International Center of Photography, New York (2003); Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography, Museum of Modern Art, New York (2010); La Triennale, Intense Proximity, Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2012), among many others.

Weems has been celebrated with numerous awards and honors, including a Smithsonian Fellowship (1987); Louis Comfort Tiffany Award (1992); National Endowment for the Arts Visual Arts Grant (1994–95); The May Ingraham Bunting Award, Radcliffe College, Cambridge, MA (1995); The Alpert Award for Visual Arts (1996); Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in Photography (2002); Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize Fellowship (2005–06); Honorary Degree from Colgate University, Hamilton, NY (2007); Skowhegan Medal for Photography, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Skowhegan, ME (2007); Anonymous Was a Woman Foundation, New York (2007); Honorary Doctorate, Smith College, Northampton, MA (2011); Medal of Arts award from the U. S. State Department (2012); Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Honoree (2013); and National Academician (2013). In addition, Weems was recently awarded a 2013 MacArthur Fellowship by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao which opened in 1997, and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, currently in development. Looking to the future, the Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that take contemporary art, architecture, and design beyond the walls of the museum. More information about the foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.

VISITOR INFORMATION
Admission: Adults $22, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. The Guggenheim’s new, free app,available with admission or by download to personal devices, offers an enhanced visitor experience. The app features content on special exhibitions, including Carrie Mae Weems, as well as access to more than 1,300 works in the Guggenheim’s permanent collection and information about the museum’s landmark building. A verbal imaging guide for the collection is available for visitors who are blind or have low vision. The Guggenheim app is sponsored by Bloomberg.

Museum Hours: Sun–Wed, 10 am–5:45 pm; Fri, 10 am–5:45 pm; Sat, 10 am–7:45 pm; closed Thurs. On Saturdays, beginning at 5:45 pm, the museum hosts Pay What You Wish. For general information, call 212 423 3500 or visit the museum online at: guggenheim.org and guggenheim.org/connect

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December 28, 2013 - Posted by | ART, CULTURE, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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