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Submissions for Playwrights of Color!Dec 1 Deadline

2017 POCS Submissions

Quick Silver Theater Company’s

open (Blind) playwright submission process has begun.

The deadline for submissions is December 1st, 2016

For the second year in a row,

Quick Silver Theater Company has commited to the development of emerging playwrights of color.

 

Our Playwrights of Color Summit will offer three select playwrights a week long retreat in Geneva, NY.  Playwrights will receive a stipend, room and board.  A director and cast will be selected to work alongside each playwright.

 

Here is an opportunity to engage with like minded artists in an easeful environment.  A script in hand reading of your work will be presented at the end of the week followed by a skillfully guided talk back open to the  community of Geneva and your peers.

QST’s hosting campuses of Hobart and William Smith Colleges are just a stones throw away from Seneca Lake.  The peaceful environs of Geneva will spark your creative juices.   A secluded yet inspiring work space on the campus will also be provided.

Become a part of the annual process.

It’s all about the words.  Invigorate, Educate and Generate conversation.

We look forward to hearing from you.

This amazing experience should not be missed.

November 29, 2016 Posted by | BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NYC High School Students: Submit Dance Films for an Opportunity to Screen at Dance on Camera Festival! APPLY BY JANUARY 15

           


NYC High School Students: Submit Dance Films for an Opportunity to Screen at Dance on Camera Festival!

APPLY BY JANUARY 15

Submissions are now open for Capturing Motion NYC, Dance Films Association’s annual workshop series and dance film competition for students!

High school students from any of NYC’s five boroughs may submit dance films between 1-5 minutes in length. Our call for submissions will be open until January 15, 2017. Finalists and the winning film will screen at the 45th Annual Dance on Camera Festival (February 3 ‒ 7,2017) co-presented by Dance Films Association and the Film Society of Lincoln Center. In addition, DFA will partner with Choreoscope International Dance Film Festival in Barcelona, Spain to present the Capturing Motion NYC winning film.

Films should be between 1-5 minutes in length and feature dance as the main component. We accept dance films of all genres that address the relationship between dance and the camera. Any subject may serve as inspiration: social or street dance, dance in religious settings, professional dance, or non-dance images filmed so that they evoke dance, choreography, and movement in imaginative ways.

Click below to view the guidelines and submit films by 11:59PM EST on January 15, 2017. Email info@dancefilms.org with any questions!

Bring Capturing Motion NYC to your school or organization!
Schedule a dance film workshop, master class, lecture, or screening led by an industry professional.
Dance Films Association works with high schools, after school programs, and arts organizations to program dance film workshops, master classes, lectures, and screenings led by industry professionals. In past years, we’ve collaborated with The Beacon School, Brownsville Academy High School, and Frank Sinatra School of the Arts, and with organizations such as Dancewave, the New Museum, and Abrons Arts Center.

See examples of past Capturing Motion NYC programs on our websiteand email info@dancefilms.org to learn more!

Learn More
Dance Films Association receives generous support from our members and MINDBODY, CORE™, The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council, The Office of the Mayor Bill de Blasio, and Commissioner Tom Finkelpearl, as well as The New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, the National Endowment for the Arts, Jody and John Arnhold, Dance and New Media Foundation, Funders for LGBTQ Issues, and Materials for the Arts. To support Dance Films Association and learn more, visit dancefilms.org.
Photos (top to bottom):

Still from THIS TOWN, 2016 Capturing Motion NYC Winning Film
Dir. Alexus Getzelmen, Tillie Simon, and Isabelle Sturges

Behind-the-scenes video from the YAK Films-led ChoreoCollective workshop at Abrons Arts Center, Spring 2016
Video by Brighid Greene

About DFA            |           Contact Us
Dance Films Association
252 Java Street Suite #333
Brooklyn, NY 11222
info@dancefilms.org
(347) 505-8649
Copyright © Dance Films Association, Inc. All rights reserved.

November 29, 2016 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , | Leave a comment

SUPPORT THE HARLEM ARTS FESTIVAL

GET THE 1ST HARLEM ARTS FESTIVAL MIX TAPE!
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HAF’s getting funky this holiday season! We’ve put together a special mix-tape for our fans and supporters!

Make a donation of $5 or more to HAF by the end of Giving Tuesday (Nov. 29th), and we’ll send you a secret link to our exclusive mix-tape which has some unreleased HAF artist tracks and HAF artist favorites, curated especially for you!

Click the mix-tape above or the button below to find out how you can support HAF this year!

SUPPORT HARLEM ARTS FESTIVAL
Why support Harlem Arts Festival? Hear one HAFan’s story by clicking above.
MORE WAYS TO GIVE

Lyft is giving more to HAF fans!

Existing users, click here to receive 10% off your next ride. HAFRIDE10 code will be applied once you click the link and enter your phone number.
New users get $50 in Lyft credits by clicking here to have the code applied once downloaded from link. Or use code HAFRIDE!

Looking for other ways to give? Join the rest of the country in giving back for the holidays by giving to HAF in some creative ways like Amazon SmileEmployee Matching, and by supporting monthly with as little as $5, and more!
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#ICYMI: Check out this recap from our Happy Hour Fundraiser, hosted by our Junior Board! HAF Artists AKIR, Bria Monet, and Shannon Berry gave a quick taste of what HAF is all about.
WHAT’S COMING UP:
HAF Session: Open Mic Recap

Open Mic – December 8

Join us for a fun-filled evening as HAF artists and YOU get to perform together! Get a taste of last year’s open mic above.

PURCHASE TICKETS
INTERESTED IN BECOMING A HAF ARTIST? THE APPLICATION IS OPEN NOW THROUGH JANUARY 15TH, 2017.
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Harlem Arts Festival is completely volunteer-run, and is supported by people like you! Please help us continue our work by making a donation today!
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November 28, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, BUSINESS, ENTREPRENEURS, LIFESTYLES, Music, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , | Leave a comment

Theatre/Profiles: Audelco Award Nominee WALK HARD actress Gabrielle C. Archer

The Audelco Awards are the Independent Black Theatre Awards equivalent to the TONY’S.

On Nov. 21, the 44th Annual Vivian Robinson AUDELCO Recognition Awards for Excellence in Black Theatre will be  given in Neew York City, New York, at Symphony Space.

Vivian Robinson established AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee) as a non-profit membership organization in 1973. At the time, the AUDELCO awards were the only awards ceremony to celebrate the accomplishments of African Americans in the fields of theatre and dance. The principal mission of the AUDELCO Awards is to enhance a comprehension of the arts in African-American communities. The AUDELCO Awards also aim to generate new audiences for non-profit theatre companies and to ensure better public relations.

We had a chance to interview one of the RISING stars, actress Gabrielle C. Archer

headshot

Describe your latest play and your role:

This past Spring I played Ruth in Walk Hard directed by Imani Douglas and written by Abraham Hill, founder of the American Negro Theatre. Ruth is girlfriend to protagonist, Andy Whitman. Andy is a bright but stubborn shine boy turned boxer in Jim Crow New York. The battles inside the ring mirror those outside of it. I believe Ruth to be the moral compass of the play and for Andy. She tries to keep him focused but cool headed & reasonable. She believes power is in organizing. She is part of the nascent movement of unions budding in the late 30s. 

I loved Ruth. She is a strong and powerful woman. A wise and tender soul with whom I nonetheless parted ways in the play’s finale. In my mind, I thought her final words were a bit of a sell out. She speaks of the struggle being that of poor people in general. True words that are a bit All Lives Matter to me. An actor mustn’t judge his character, though, but rather try his best to understand him. Those were my personal feelings, I kept them separate. At the end of the day she was her own kind of warrior and Andy’s rock. 

I was really honored to be part of a team of  much more experienced and talented actors  in a little downtown theatre with a lot of repute with regards to show-casing challenging, subversive, engaging and political pieces. The Metropolitan Playhouse always hosts talk backs after the Sundaymatinees of every run. These talk-backs are enlightening. On our last talk back we had the delightful surprise of having playwright Mr Hill’s family there to exchange ideas and reactions. It’ll always be one of my proudest moment having them express great pleasure at our telling of the story. It was a fun and growing experience all in all.

You have done a lot of theatre work . Is the stage your preferred platform?

I’ve mainly done theatre, yes. I haven’t fully delved into the world of film. I have done a few indies but I do feel more comfortable on stage. By comfortable I by no means mean that I don’t get utterly nervous each time I do a play, but I like the continuity and chronology of stage work. Once you step on that stage there is no turning back -you have to be in every moment till the curtain goes down. Film is very intimate and requires different techniques I must hone. I plan on increasing my experience in that field. 

You notched Shakespeare on your belt in CORIOLANUS. 

Explain the attraction of Shakespeare for actors.

It’s the great frontier. He is a poet, a master of language and story-telling. Shakespearian language is intimidating but beautiful and fun. I’ve always loved language for language itself and anyone who does can appreciate the rhythm, music of Shakespeare’s tales. 

Actors are always training. what are you studying now?

I hadn’t taken a class in far too long (it’s expensive and I figured let me get in there and learn by dong it and doing it with experienced, better actors to keep me on my toes). But acting is a muscle that must constantly be worked out in order not to atrophy. No excuses.

 I got lucky and came upon Alice Spivak through an actor friend of mine. She has been in the industry for a long time and studied with the classic teachers. Her class is very enjoyable and challenging. She is tender and knowledgeable. I am at the moment juggling with 4( soon to be 5) characters ranging from Shakespeare to Chekhov to Neil Simon. It’s great fun being in a class of broad age range and an array of talent from advanced to professional.

How is it? do you have a preferred style or method? what and why? 

Alice bases her teaching on the Stanislavsky technique but strays from it as well. She’s brilliant! Studying your craft is so important but I believe in using tools from all techniques and mixing it up for whatever works for you in a given circumstance. 

The interview continues below…

Metropolitan Playhouse
The American Legacy

220 East Fourth Street ~ New York, New York 10009
Administration: (212) 995 8410  ~  Tickets: (800) 838 3006

A 2007 Company of the Year ~ nytheatre.com

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2015-2016 Season
AUDELCO VIV Award Nominee
Best Revival
“A major rediscovery….a cast that excels.”
Peter Filichia
“An electrifying revival”
– Victor Gluck,
Joshua David Scarlett and Peter Tedeschi
photo: Jacob J. Goldberg Photography

What’s worth the fight?

Walk Hard
by Abram Hill
February 19 – March 20, 2016

A bright young man with quick fists is given the shot to be a champion boxer… if he is willing to accept the racist rules that govern America of the 1930’s.

A play from the co-founder of the
American Negro Theater.

Read More about the play and
The American Negro Theater

Running Time: 2:00

SUNDAY TALKBACKS…following the matinees
February/March 2016
Sun Mon Tues
Weds Thurs Fri Sat
19

7:30 pm

20

7:30 pm

21
3 pm
22

7:30 pm

23 24 25

7:30 pm

26

7:30 pm

27

7:30 pm

28
3 pm
TALK
29 1 2 3

7:30 pm

4

7:30 pm

5

7:30 pm

6
3 pm
TALK
7 8 9
3 pm
10

7:30 pm

11

7:30 pm

12
3 pm
7:30 pm
13
3 pm
TALK
14 15 16
3 pm
17

7:30 pm

18

7:30 pm

19
3 pm
7:30 pm
20
3 pm
TALK
Featuring:
Frank Anderson*
Gabrielle C. Archer
Craig Anthony Bannister*
Michael Basile*
Sean Michael Buckley*
Chris Krause
Beethovan Oden*
Joshua David Scarlett
Vanessa Shaw
Joy Sudduth
Peter Tedeschi*
Kim Yancey-Moore*

Crew:
DIRECTOR Imani
STAGE MANAGER  William Vann Carlton*
LIGHTING Melody Beal
COSTUME  Sidney Fortner
SOUND  Bill Toles
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR  LaVonda Elam

*These actors and stage manager appear courtesy of
Actors Equity Association.
Walk Hard is an AEA Approved Showcase

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You are fluent in French and studied at the Sorbonne. What was that experience like?

I used my year abroad to go home for a year and live alone. I studied Literature, Psychology and a bit of Film at the Sorbonne and at Paris X Nanterre University (where my mother went). These schools are polar opposites. The Sorbonne is a prestigious and picturesque school in the heart of Paris whereas Nanterre is a large, more modern public university with little architectural charm on the outskirts of the city. Both are good and have historical value. I enjoyed going from one to the other and learned from each. I preferred Nanterre which had more warmth -in my experience- than the Sorbonne with its intimidating cold marble floors and quiet hallways. The classes there were challenging and mind-titillating. Nanterre was vibrant with more diverse, “on the fringe”, young  minds. 

Paris is just as contrasted and contradictory. You can get lost in the streets of Paris for hours on end…  It is eternally beautiful but within it is a lot of sadness, dissatisfaction, anger and divide. It’s still one of the prettiest places I’ve ever seen. I saw a lot of ugly, but Paris has timeless charm, great food, culture and love of Philosophy*. (*that endless search for truth/knowledge)

You have also directed and recently started in production as well. Does that appeal to you? Why or why not?

I’d like to do more of both. Any production is good, hard team work. We’re all essential pieces of a puzzle. I’m interested in seeing all sides of things. Learning more about every aspect of my industry can only help me in my craft.

Producing is multitasking and problem solving. Developing those skills is interesting to me and will be useful. 

Directing is multi-tasking but it’s more focused. You are painting a picture. As of now, I still have work to do in terms of seeing and creating a Vision. But I can do detail -I’m an actor- so, I’m more of an actor’s director. I know how to speak to my fellow actors in order to bring out what’s needed for the overall picture. There is a language we share, an energy and a deep understanding. I need more notches on my belt to really feel comfortable with the title of director. It was a scary and very fulfilling to manage a 12 person cast under pressure. My mentor at the time would just say, “You have to make a decision. It’s going up.”

That was a great learning experience for me and I can’t wait to get another opportunity to gain more confidence and skill in that realm. 

Describe your training and background.

I’m born in Paris. Left there when I was 7 and came to New York. I went to the French Lycée, graduated with a Literature/Philosophy Baccalaureat. I then attended Amherst College (even kicked it with Lupita!). I then moved back to New York and kind of threw myself into it in a non orthodox way. I started with community theatre in Brooklyn, working with a church-based theatre troupe on a one act play called One Hour 2 Live. It told the story of a young man -a gang recruit- on death row visited by a pastor who wants to reconcile him with his devastating actions. The young man is also visited by his victims. Two of the three victims are acquaintances and I, the third, played a complete stranger. I represented a future cut short as well as the daughter he would have had. The young man is forced to delve into his past and the psychology behind what brought him to this point. It was a very powerful play which we performed throughout the boroughs and New Jersey at middle and high schools, churches, community and family centers etc. We’d have talk backs with the children (and often the boys would go off with the male actors) as well as with community leaders and mothers/family members affected by incarceration and the consequences of gang activity. We even performed at Rikers. (I had mixed feelings about that.) It was a very emotional and (sometimes) fulfilling experience. 

This is people’s real lives- it’s tough. If we were able to reach just one kid in that crowd and inspire them to stay focused, know their worth then it was worth it.  

I did that for four years and then worked an entire year on a play that would be my debut as a young professional actress (Agnes of God). It very abruptly and at the very last minute fell through and that was a painful (even a bit traumatizing) experience. But through it I met my friend and mentor, Leslie Dockery (a broadway vet, dancer, choreographer extraordinaire) and through her I found a whole community of mentors with 30 years of experience under their belt who have embraced me. I’m the baby in the group and have a ways to go. But this vet black theatre community seems to have taken me under their wing and I am blessed to have that support. My journey brought me to Imani Douglas, the Castillo Theatre (which is volunteer based with strong youth community involvement)  and, finally, the Metropolitan Playhouse which is a prestigious little downtown theatre. Simultaneously, in indie film I have found a network of young, ambitious like-minded creators and story-tellers. 

I hope to keep expanding my horizons and make proud all the people who have helped me along the way. I’ve been lucky to have them. 

What does the Audelco nomination mean to you?

The AUDELCO (Audience Development Commitee, Inc.) Recognition Awards or the “Viv Awards” (a wink to founder Vivian Robinson)  honors excellence in the black theatre at professional and non-for-profit levels. It is a pioneer organization, based out of Harlem, that has been around since the 70’s & has awarded many of the greats of the African-American theatre community (such as composer Eubie Blake, choreographer Debbie Allen and even Kerry Washington before Scandal).  It’s like the black Tony Awards! This’ll be my second time going. The first time I went as co-director of a new play Leslie Dockery and I put up at Theatre for The New  City in downtown Manhattan. She was up for Best Choreography and won! That was exciting. She’s been around for a while now and I’m lucky to call her big sister, mentor and friend.

I definitely felt Walk Hard deserved a nod or some recognition because the talent was top-notch and the story is inspiring and quite relevant to today. It was a happy and humbling surprise to find out we were nominated for Best Revival! 

Keeps raising the bar for me which is always the goal and I get to be around and part of yet another piece of Black History.

You come from an illustrious family background. Explain.

Growing up I had the blessing of calling a living piece of history my grand-father or G-daddy -as my sister and I liked to call him. He was our very own piece of World, American and Black History!

My grand-father, Lee Andrew Archer was a Tuskeegee Airman. He was part of the 332nd Fighter Group and became the first black Ace (he shot down 5 enemy fighter aircraft). He flew the “Macon Belle” named after my beautiful grand-mother, Ina, born in Macon, Georgia. He later maintained a career in the US Airforce as a Lieutenant Colonel. After retiring from the military, he became a successful business man and mentor to other successful black business men. In 2004 he received the French Legion of Honor. That was a proud day for us as a family. I remember being there on the coast of Normandy and being thrilled at just how unique and special he was. In 2007 he received the Congressional Medal. At the end of the day, though, he was just our grand-daddy who provided us with a great family foundation and a lucky childhood. We knew how cool he was but naturally, in retrospect and as I get older, I regret not having asked more questions. I just hope to continue to make him proud and share his story and strong legacy. Y parents are also diplomats and writers.

Do you have a specific plan for the future?

I want to venture more into film and work on television eventually. I want to experience what the industry is like in Atlanta and then L.A. I’d love to do a French film. French cinema (especially the New Wave era) has always been inspiring to me. 

Essentially, I want to continue expanding my horizons while working on inspiring projects and telling unique and/or important stories.

Right now I’m working on Miranda –  a film that will bring awareness to domestic abuse. The talent is immense but the funds are limited. If anyone would like to help bring this project to fruition please go to www.gofundme.com/mirandamovie and you can check out director’s previous work at kentsuttton.com. Thanks for the support!

What was your most satisfying performance to you?

I really enjoyed playing “One Dropper” Emma in One Drop a piece by Andrea Fulton set in 1800s Louisiana. It’s based on her family history and tells of an African-American couple who chose to stay in their community and prosper rather than leave and pass. It spoke to me on a very deep level. I particularly liked how beautifully it communicated a part of Black History to children and all ages through original New Orleans music and classical story-telling form.

I think performing for the youth earlier in my career was the most fulfilling for me. Children are our most important and essential resource. To have them come talk to us after each show, just looking to connect, receive advice, inspiration, motivation, recognition, things we all need and deserve, was very rewarding. One Hour 2 Live was a tough play (written by a pastor in Brooklyn tired of counseling those affected by gang violence) but it had a cathartic effect on who needed it. I’ll never forget the one time a young woman cried out in the middle of the play and had to be escorted out. That was difficult, staying in character during that moment. I hope we didn’t hurt her heart but rather opened it because she felt heard, noticed and cared for. I’ll also always remember a little boy -one of many- standing up after a performance and vowing unprompted to choose his friends wisely and focus on being his best self. Hearing the youth speak -express themselves so intelligently- while surrounded by a caring community of mothers, parents and teachers was the most satisfying. 

What would you like your legacy to be?

I want to stay true to myself – my complicated, imperfect self- tell stories from all walks of life (the good, the bad, the beautiful and the ugly) so we can stop judging each other and see our common humanity.

I’d like to make my grand-daddy proud. Keep telling important stories but also have fun. 

I want to reach children and inspire them. I want to spread love, warmth, self-worth and respect for our elders, our history, our ancestry, what brought us all to this point as we look forward and live our biggest life. 

I’m not literate enough in the history of Black Theatre to give much of an opinion except that I am so happy and proud that its legacy is being so wonderfully upheld. Black theaters such as the National Black Theatre, based in ever-changing Harlem, are still up and kicking and need our continued support. Brilliant talents like Danai Gurira who are telling stories never told on Broadway and opening eyes so eloquently are very motivating!

Playing Salome was fun. She is the ultimate femme fatale but she is also a child. The role was divided in two and I played her innocent side -which wasn’t quite as appealing to me. I nonetheless enjoyed delving into the Old World and using elevated almost Shakespearian language. 

My advice to newcomers would be study, work and surround yourself with ambitious people. Find mentors to help guide you. Creating a strong reel and having a strong headshot is also essential. 

Thank You, Ms. Archer!

The AUDELCO AWARDS will be presented November 21, 2016 in New York City

Walk Hard
by Abram Hill

co-founder of the American Negro Theater

 Walk Hard

Joshua David Scarlett
photo: Alex Roe

What’s worth fighting for?

February 19 – March 20, 2016

 METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE
220 E 4th Street
New York, NY

800 838 3006

 

Previews Begin
Friday, February 19th

Opening Night
Friday, February 26th
Performance and Reception
7:30 pm

Performances through March 20th

From 1944

Working as a shoeshine boy in 1939, nineteen-year-old Andy Whitman’s ambition is limited only by the color of his skin.
Bright, industrious, and black, his daily struggle makes make him quick with his temper and his fists.
When he catches the eye of a boxing manager in a street fight, Andy is soon a rising star in a fast-paced game.
But it is a game of devil’s bargains, played with dubious partners, and some rules never change when a black man looks for respect in a white world.

We are delighted to revive this remarkable drama as part of our 24th Season,
The Season of Hope.

 

METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE
220 E 4th Street
New York, NY

Walk Hard

February 19th – March 20th, 2016

Thursdays – Saturdays at 7:30 pm
Sundays at 3 pm

PLUS
Pay What You Will: Monday, 2/22 at 7:30pm
Added Matinees: Wednesdays (3/9 & 3/16) Saturdays (3/12 & 12/19) at 3pm

Talkbacks after Sunday matinées.

 

*These actors appear courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association.
Walk Hard
is an AEA Approved Showcase

AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee, Inc.)

The AUDELCO (Audience Development Committee, Inc.) is an organization that acknowledges and honors Black Theatre and its artists in New York City. Established and incorporated in 1973 by the late Vivian Robinson, to stimulate interest in and support of performing arts in black communities.

AUDELCO Recognition Awards – The annual Vivian Robinson/AUDELCO Recognition, “The VIV”Awards are the only formally established awards presented to the black theatre community.  Every third Monday in November the nominees are awarded in various categories.

 

 

 

2016 Nominees

LIGHTING DESIGN
Alan C. Edwards (Macbeth)
Nathan Hawkins/William Kenyon (Blood at the Root)
Tyler Micoleau (Familiar)
Austin R. Smith (The Royale)
Thom Weaver (The Total Bent)

SET DESIGN
Michael Carnahan (Skeleton Crew)
Maruti Evans (Dead and Breathing)
G.W. Mercier (Head of Passes)
Clint Ramos (Familiar)
Daniel Robinson (The First Noel)

COSTUME DESIGN
Dede M. Ayite (The Royale)
Gabriel Berry (The Total Bent)
Rachel Dozier-Ezell (Macbeth)
Susan Hilferty (Familiar)
Toni-Leslie James (Head of Passes)

SOUND DESIGN
Obadiah Eaves/Sten Severson (The Total Bent)
Rob Kaplowitz (Skeleton Crew)
John McKenna (Macbeth)
Liz Sokolak (Blood at the Root)
Darron L. West (Familiar)

DIRECTOR/DRAMATIC PRODUCTION
Carl Cofield (Macbeth)
Kenny Leon (Smart People)
Jonathan McCrory (Dead and Breathing)
Ruben Santiago-Hudson (Skeleton Crew)
Liesl Tommy (Eclipsed)

DIRECTOR/MUSICAL PRODUCTION
Steve H. Broadnax III (The First Noel)
Jeff Calhoun (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
Angie Kristic (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Joanna Settle (The Total Bent)

PLAYWRIGHT
Lydia Diamond (Smart People)
Colman Domingo (Dot)
Danai Gurira (Familiar)
Chisa Hutchinson (Dead and Breathing)
Dominique Morisseau (Skeleton Crew)
Marco Ramirez (The Royale)

SUPPORTING ACTOR
Francois Battiste (Head of Passes)
Jason Dirden (Skeleton Crew)
Michael Potts (Mother Courage and Her Children)
Larry Powell (The Christians)
David Roberts (The Fall of the Kings)
Kim Sullivan (The Piano Lesson)

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Ito Aghayere (Familiar)
Alana Arenas (Head of Passes)
Vinie Burrows (I Will Look Forward to This Later)
Montego Glover (The Royale)
Nikiya Mathis (Skeleton Crew)
Linda Powell (The Christians)
Myra Lucretia Taylor (Familiar)

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN A MUSICAL – FEMALE
Tina Fabrique (The First Noel)
Ashley Ware Jenkins (The First Noel)
Traci Michelle (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE IN A MUSICAL – MALE
Ato Blankson-Wood (The Total Bent)
Isaac Gay (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Vondie Curtis Hall (The Total Bent)
Maurice Hines (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
CB Murray (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)
Nathaniel Stampley (The First Noel)

CHOREOGRAPHY
Brian Harlan Brooks (The First Noel)
Maurice Hines (Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life)
David Neumann (The Total Bent)
Tiffany Rea-Fisher (Macbeth)
Kyndra “Binkie” Reevey (Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse)

OUTSTANDING ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE
A Lovely Malfunction (Negro Ensemble Company)
Barbecue (The Public Theater)
but I cld only whisper (The Flea)
Dead and Breathing (National Black Theatre)
Eclipsed (The Public Theater)
Proof (Quick Silver Theatre/Classics in Color Theatre Co.)
Timeless: The Mystery of the Dark Water (Black Spectrum Theatre)

SOLO PERFORMANCE
Trezana Beverley (Mabel Madness)
Staceyann Chin (Motherstruck!)
Cherie Danielle (The Diary of An Afro Goddess)
Tommie J. Moore (Dare to Be Black: The Jack Johnson Story)
Khalil Muhammad (Pryor Truth)
Reginald L. Wilson (Sugar Ray)

LEAD ACTOR
Mahershala Ali (Smart People)
Khris Davis (The Royale)
RJ Foster (Richard III)
Wendell B. Franklin (Skeleton Crew)
Joe Morton (Turn Me Loose)
Jahi Kassa Taquara (The Piano Lesson)

LEAD ACTRESS
Lynda Gravatt (Skeleton Crew)
Marjorie Johnson (Dot)
Kecia Lewis (Mother Courage and Her Children)
Phylicia Rashad (Head of Passes)
Tessa Thompson (Smart People)
Tamara Tunie (Familiar)

BEST REVIVAL
In the Heights (Harlem Repertory Theatre)
In White America (New Federal Theatre)
Macbeth (Classical Theatre of Harlem)
Mother Courage and Her Children (Classic Stage Company)
Proof (Quick Silver Theatre/Classics in Color Theatre Co.)
The Piano Lesson (Gallery Players)
Walk Hard (Metropolitan Playhouse)

MUSICAL PRODUCTION OF THE YEAR
Cherchez La Femme: A Musical Excuse (La Mama)
Maurice Hines Tappin’ Thru Life (New World Stages)
The First Noel (Classical Theatre of Harlem)
The Total Bent (The Public Theater)

DRAMATIC PRODUCTION OF THE YEAR
Dead and Breathing (National Black Theatre)
Dot (Vineyard Theatre)
Familiar (Playwrights Horizons)
Skeleton Crew (Atlantic Theater Company)
Smart People (Second Stage Theatre).
The Royale (Lincoln Center Theater)

 

As a “Friend of AUDELCO,” you receive discounts to some of your favorite Off and Off-Off Broadway theatres when you attend theatre and dance productions.

AUDELCO, Inc. activities include:

Networking – Contacting and developing relationships with individuals, local groups, churches, and other organizations to introduce new audiences to non-profit performing arts.

AUDELCO Recognition Awards – The annual Vivian Robinson/AUDELCO Recognition, “The VIV”Awards are the only formally established awards presented to the black theatre community.  Every third Monday in November the nominees are awarded in various categories.

Theatre for the Future:Young Audiences Series – Addresses the need for positive cultural experiences for children between the ages of 10-17.  This series provides entertainment and cultural experience for the youth.  This series provides entertainment and cultural enrichment in non-academic settings such as: outdoor activities during Harlem Week; Saturday matinees during Black Arts Festival; Holiday celebrations in December, and performances during Black History Month.

Black Theatre Archives – A collection of books, tapes, original scripts, costumes and set designs, photographs, playbills and extensive clippings on current theatre groups and activities.

Publications-“INTERMISSION”, AUDELCO‘s newsletter is published quarterly to stimulate interest in the performing arts.  The “OVERTURE”, a black theatre magazine that is published to document exciting work done by Black theatre artists.

Seminars, Lectures, and Forums- Addresses the general awareness about the contributions of Blacks in the cultural and socio-economic environment.

November 18, 2016 Posted by | ART, avant-garde, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, FILM, LIFESTYLES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2017 WHITNEY BIENNIAL, THE FIRST TO TAKE PLACE IN THE MUSEUM’S DOWNTOWN BUILDING, TO OPEN MARCH 17

2017 WHITNEY BIENNIAL, THE FIRST TO TAKE PLACE IN THE MUSEUM’S DOWNTOWN BUILDING, TO OPEN MARCH 17

NEW YORK, November 17, 2016—The formation of self and the individual’s place in a turbulent society are among the key themes reflected in the work of the artists selected for the 2017 Whitney Biennial, opening at the Whitney Museum of American Art on March 17, and running through June 11. Curated by the Whitney’s Nancy and Fred Poses Associate Curator Christopher Y. Lew and independent curator Mia Locks, this will be the first Biennial held in the Whitney’s home in the Meatpacking District. The country’s preeminent survey of the current state of American art, this is the seventy-eighth in the Museum’s ongoing series of Annuals and Biennials, initiated by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney in 1932.

Lew and Locks named the sixty-three participants, whose works will fill two of the four main gallery floors of the Whitney (including the 18,000-square-foot Neil Bluhm Family Galleries on the fifth floor) and numerous other spaces throughout the Museum. The participants range from emerging to well-established individuals and collectives working in painting, sculpture, drawing, installation, film and video, photography, activism, performance, music, and video game design.

Scott Rothkopf, the Whitney’s Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator and Deputy Director for Programs, said, “Since we opened our new building, we’ve reignited our emerging artist program with venturesome solo premieres and ‘snapshot’ shows of new tendencies. This Biennial, the largest ever in terms of gallery space, marks the capstone of these efforts. Chris and Mia have done an amazing job scouring the country to discover new talents, while creating lively connections to senior figures and our roiling social landscape.”

Lew commented that, “Throughout our research and travel we’ve been moved by the impassioned discussions we had about recent tumult in society, politics, and the economic system. It’s been unavoidable as we met with artists, fellow curators, writers, and other cultural producers across the United States and beyond.” Locks noted: “Against this backdrop, many of the participating artists are asking probing questions about the self and the social, and where these intersect. How do we think and live through these lenses? How and where do they fall short?”

Rothkopf is leading a team of advisors who are working closely with Lew and Locks to help shape the exhibition. They include: Negar Azimi, writer and senior editor at Bidoun, an award-winning publishing, curatorial, and educational initiative with a focus on the Middle East and its diasporas; Gean Moreno, curator of programs at the Institute of Contemporary Art Miami and founder of [NAME] Publications; Aily Nash, co-curator of Projections, the New York Film Festival’s artists’s film and video section, and Film and Media Curator at Basilica Hudson; and Wendy Yao, a publisher and founder of both the exhibition space 356 South Mission Road and Ooga Booga, a shop with two Los Angeles locations that specializes in independent books, music, art, and clothing. Nash, together with the curators, is co-organizing the Biennial film program, which will screen in the Whitney’s third-floor Susan and John Hess Family Theater.

The 2017 Biennial will be accompanied by an exhibition catalogue, designed by Olga Casellas Badillo of San Juan-based Tiguere Corp., which includes essays by the curators as well as Biennial advisors Negar Azimi and Gean Moreno, a conversation between the curators and Scott Rothkopf, and a roundtable with filmmakers moderated by Aily Nash. The book will also feature individual entries on each of the sixty-three participants in the exhibition along with reproductions of their work. It will be published by the Whitney Museum of American Art and distributed by Yale University Press.

The full list of artists follows:

Zarouhie Abdalian
Born 1982 in New Orleans, LA
Lives in New Orleans, LA

Basma Alsharif
Born 1983 in Kuwait City, Kuwait
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Jo Baer
Born 1929 in Seattle, WA
Lives in Amsterdam, Netherlands

Eric Baudelaire
Born 1973 in Salt Lake City, UT
Lives in Paris, France

Robert Beavers
Born 1949 in Brookline, MA
Lives in Berlin, Germany and Falmouth, MA

Larry Bell
Born 1939 in Chicago, IL
Lives in Taos, NM and Los Angeles, CA

Matt Browning
Born 1984 in Redmond, WA
Lives in Seattle, WA

Susan Cianciolo
Born 1969 in Providence, RI
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Mary Helena Clark
Born 1983 in Santee, SC
Lives in Hamilton, NY

John Divola
Born 1949 in Santa Monica, CA
Lives in Riverside, CA

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer
Born 1979 in New York, NY
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Rafa Esparza
Born 1981 in Los Angeles, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Kevin Jerome Everson
Born 1965 in Mansfield, OH
Lives in Charlottesville, VA

GCC
(Nanu Al-Hamad, Abdullah Al-Mutairi, Aziz Alqatami, Barrak Alzaid, Khalid al Gharaballi, Amal Khalaf, Fatima Al Qadiri, Monira Al Qadiri)
Founded 2013

Oto Gillen
Born 1984 in New York, NY
Lives in New York, NY

Samara Golden
Born 1973 in Ann Arbor, MI
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Casey Gollan and Victoria Sobel
Born 1991 in Los Angeles, CA; born 1990 in Washington, DC
Lives in New York, NY; lives in New York, NY

Irena Haiduk
Biographical information not given

Lyle Ashton Harris
Born 1965 in Bronx, NY
Lives in New York, NY

Tommy Hartung
Born 1979 in Akron, OH
Lives in Queens, NY

Porpentine Charity Heartscape
Born 1987, location not given
Lives in Oakland, CA

Sky Hopinka
Born 1984 in Bellingham, WA
Lives in Milwaukee, WI

Shara Hughes
Born 1981 in Atlanta, GA
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Aaron Flint Jamison
Born 1979 in Billings, MT
Lives in Portland, OR and Seattle, WA

KAYA
(Kerstin Brätsch and Debo Eilers)
Founded 2010

Jon Kessler
Born 1957 in Yonkers, NY
Lives in New York, NY

James N. Kienitz Wilkins
Born in 1983 in Boston, MA
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Ajay Kurian
Born 1984 in Baltimore, MD
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Deana Lawson
Born 1979 in Rochester, NY
Lives Brooklyn, NY

An-My Lê
Born 1960 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Leigh Ledare
Born 1976 in Seattle, WA
Lives in New York, NY

Dani Leventhal
Born 1972 in Columbus, OH
Lives in Columbus, OH

Tala Madani
Born 1981 in Tehran, Iran
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Park McArthur
Born 1984 in Raleigh, NC
Lives in New York, NY

Harold Mendez
Born 1977 in Chicago, IL
Lives in Chicago, IL and Los Angeles, CA

Carrie Moyer
Born 1960 in Detroit, MI
Lives in New York, NY

Ulrike Müller
Born 1971 in Brixlegg, Austria
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Julien Nguyen
Born 1990 in Washington, DC
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Tuan Andrew Nguyen
Born 1976 in Saigon, Vietnam
Lives in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Raúl de Nieves
Born 1983 in Morelia, Mexico
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Aliza Nisenbaum
Born 1977 in Mexico City, Mexico
Lives in New York, NY

Occupy Museums
(Arthur Polendo, Imani Jacqueline Brown, Kenneth Pietrobono, Noah Fischer, and Tal Beery)
Founded 2011

Pope.L aka William Pope.L
Born 1955 in Newark, NJ
Lives in Chicago, IL

Postcommodity
(Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez, Kade L. Twist)
Founded 2007

Puppies Puppies
Born 1989 in Dallas, TX
Lives in Roswell, NM

Asad Raza
Born 1974 in Buffalo, NY
Lives in New York, NY

Jessi Reaves
Born 1986 in Portland, OR
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

John Riepenhoff
Born 1982 in Milwaukee, WI
Lives in Milwaukee, WI

Chemi Rosado-Seijo
Born 1973 in Vega Alta, PR
Lives in San Juan and Naranjito, PR

Cameron Rowland
Born 1988 in Philadelphia, PA
Lives in Queens, NY

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz
Born 1972 in San Juan, PR
Lives in San Juan, PR

Dana Schutz
Born 1976 in Livonia, MI
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Cauleen Smith
Born 1967 in Riverside, CA
Lives in Chicago, IL

Frances Stark
Born 1967 in Newport Beach, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Maya Stovall
Born 1982 in Detroit, MI
Lives in Detroit, MI

Henry Taylor
Born 1958 in Oxnard, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Torey Thornton
Born 1990 in Macon, GA
Lives in Brooklyn, NY

Leslie Thornton and James Richards
Born 1951 in Knoxville, TN; born 1983 in Cardiff, United Kingdom
Lives in Brooklyn, NY; lives in Berlin, Germany and London, United Kingdom

Kaari Upson
Born 1972 in San Bernardino, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Kamasi Washington
Born 1981 in Los Angeles, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA

Leilah Weinraub
Born 1979 in Los Angeles, CA
Lives in Los Angeles, CA and New York, NY

Jordan Wolfson
Born 1980 in New York, NY
Lives in New York, NY

Anicka Yi
Born 1971 in Seoul, South Korea
Lives in Queens, NY


EXHIBITION SUPPORT

Whitney Biennial 2017 is presented by

Tiffany & Co.
Major support is provided by

Sothebys

Major support is also provided by The Brown Foundation, Inc. of Houston and the National Committee of the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Significant support is provided by the Philip and Janice Levin Foundation.

Generous support is provided by 2017 Biennial Committee Co-Chairs: Leslie Bluhm, Beth Rudin DeWoody, Bob Gersh, and Miyoung Lee.

Funding is also provided by special Biennial endowments created by Melva Bucksbaum, Emily Fisher Landau, Leonard A. Lauder, and Fern and Lenard Tessler.

Additional support is provided by endowments from The Keith Haring Foundation Exhibition Fund, Donna Perret Rosen and Benjamin M. Rosen, and the Jon and Mary Shirley Foundation.

Curatorial research and travel for this exhibition was funded by an endowment established by Rosina Lee Yue and Bert A. Lies, Jr., MD.


ABOUT THE WHITNEY

The Whitney Museum of American Art, founded in 1930 by the artist and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875–1942), houses the foremost collection of American art from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Mrs. Whitney, an early and ardent supporter of modern American art, nurtured groundbreaking artists at a time when audiences were still largely preoccupied with the Old Masters. From her vision arose the Whitney Museum of American Art, which has been championing the most innovative art of the United States for more than eighty years. The core of the Whitney’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit American art of our time and serve a wide variety of audiences in celebration of the complexity and diversity of art and culture in the United States. Through this mission and a steadfast commitment to artists themselves, the Whitney has long been a powerful force in support of modern and contemporary art and continues to help define what is innovative and influential in American art today.


CURRENT AND UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight
Through January 2, 2017

Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art, 1905–2016
Through February 5, 2017

Virginia Overton: Winter Garden
Through February 5, 2017

Human Interest: Portraits from the Whitney’s Collection
Through February 12, 2017

MPA: RED IN VIEW
Through February 27, 2017

Whitney Biennial
March 17–June 11, 2017

Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium
July 14–October 1, 2017

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World
Fall 2017–Winter 2018

David Wojnarowicz: History Keeps Me Awake at Night
Summer 2018

The Whitney Museum of American Art is located at 99 Gansevoort Street between Washington and West Streets, New York City. Museum hours are: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday from 10:30 am to 6 pm; Friday and Saturday from 10:30 am to 10 pm. Closed Tuesday. Adults: $22 in advance via whitney.org; $25 day of visit. Full-time students and visitors 65 & over: $17 in advance via whitney.org; $18 day of visit. Visitors 18 years & under and Whitney members: FREE. Admission is pay-what-you-wish on Fridays, 7–10 pm. For general information, please call (212) 570-3600 or visit whitney.org.

November 18, 2016 Posted by | CULTURE, FILM, LIFESTYLES, Uncategorized, We Recommend | Leave a comment

Musical Theater/DANCE –STEPS BEYOND FOUNDATION PRESENTS BENEFIT PERFORMANCE OF “CALL FOSSE AT THE MINSKOFF” *NYC 12/3/16

While wonderful “New York” stories still happen today,  can you imagine getting a hand written letter from Gwen Verdon upon leaving the theater from your evening performance that reads ” Call Fosse at the Minksoff”? Some of us are lucky enough to have a  moment or an opportunity that changes the shapes of our careers. That moment for dancer Mimi Quillin was in that note and the time that followed. A one woman show, which originally premiered with three sold out performances in September as part of the United Solo Festival, returns this December to benefit the Steps on Broadway Foundation

STEPS BEYOND FOUNDATION PRESENTS BENEFIT PERFORMANCE OF
“CALL FOSSE AT THE MINSKOFF” 

One-Woman Show, Written and Performed by Mimi Quillin, Captures Experience of Working with Broadway Legends Bob Fosse and Gwen Verdon.

The Steps Beyond Foundation, Steps on Broadway’s non-profit arm committed to connecting artists and the community through dialogue, performance, and artistic collaboration, will present a benefit performance of “Call Fosse at the Minskoff” on December 3 at 8:00pm. The one-woman play, written and performed by Mimi Quillin, will be for one night only in the Steps Studio Theater.

In 1985, when Bob Fosse and Gwen Verdon presented a revival of Fosse’s 1966 Sweet Charity, dancer Mimi Quillin was invited into their magical and creative world to assist in its production. While dancing with the original American Dance Machine, Verdon handed Quillin a piece of paper backstage which read “Call Fosse at the Minskoff with his phone number.”  Verdon also gave her strict instructions on what to wear for her private audition with Bob.

A one-woman show with an honest account of a professional relationship, Quillin shares the highs and lows of Fosse’s final years, reveals his fickle nature both on and off stage, and gives us an inside look into the unique relationship of this fascinating couple. This intimate story, filled with comedy and one-liners as if Quillin is channeling Verdon, also follows Quillin’s self-discovery and recognition of her power as a woman in the dance world.

Dancing for Fosse is a roller coaster ride for both body and soul.  His choreography requires physical discipline and complete surrender to his signature style.  Fosse directs his dancers like actors, telling them to think of the steps in a dance like the words in a script…dance the meaning of the steps.  Quillin says Bob would tell me “don’t try to be real…just tell the truth”.

This work is a letter to a younger self, consumed with admiration for an idol, and the experience of joining a duo that together became a powerful vehicle for creating a specific style of movement that is taught, performed and revered today.

Call Fosse at the Minskoff premiered in September 2016 as part of the United Solo Festival in New York City.

SCHEDULE and PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
This performance, to benefit the Steps Beyond Foundation, will take place on Saturday, December 3 at 8:00 p.m.
Benefit tickets are $50, which includes reserved seating and a post-performance reception.
General admission tickets are available for $20, student tickets for $15.

All tickets are on sale at http://stepsnyc.com/steps-beyond. For benefit information, contact Erika@stepsnyc.com or call 212-874-2410, ext. 122.

VENUE INFORMATION
Steps on Broadway is located at 2121 Broadway at 74th Street, and is accessible by the 1,2, and 3 trains.

###

ABOUT THE STEPS BEYOND FOUNDATION

The Steps Beyond Foundation is dedicated to developing and sustaining dance artists and to the cultivation of the dance community. Specifically, the Foundation is committed to supporting excellence in the field by providing collaborative opportunities among established and emerging artists through community engagement, dance scholarships, performance and special events.

November 17, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

#APAP2017 #OPERA/ THEATRE / NOW PROTOTYPE #NYC JANUARY 2017

PROTOTYPE is the premier festival of opera-theatre and music-theatre. January 5-15, 2017

After just four years on the scene, PROTOTYPE: Opera/Theatre/Now has been deemed “the go-to spot for brilliantly produced new indie chamber opera” by The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times called the 2016 festival an “explosion of boundary-defying chamber opera.”

Now blazing into its fifth season, PROTOTYPE returns January 5-15, 2017. Beth Morrison Projects and HERE have come together to bring you a striking celebration of opera and a stellar array of artists, presenting new works by Matt Marks & Paul Peers; Missy Mazzoli & Royce Vavrek; David Lang & Mark Dion; M Lamar & Hunter Hunt-Hendrix; Sahba Aminikia, Jeff Beal, Mary Kouyoumdjian, Shara Nova, Toshi Reagon, DJ Spooky, & Brooklyn Youth Chorus; Sarah Small; Cerise Jacobs & Julian Wachner – at HERE and our partner presenting venues – NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts, BRIC Arts | Media House, National Sawdust, and French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF).

Tickets for PROTOTYPE 2017 are now on sale.

November 9, 2016 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

APAP Emerging Leadership Institute Announces 2017 Class of Participants

APAP Emerging Leadership Institute Announces 2017 Class of Participants

Rare opportunity for each participant to reflect on and develop their ideas about leadership and their own career

Washington, DC (September 9, 2016) – The Association of Performing Arts Presenters (APAP) announces its 16th class for the Emerging Leadership Institute (ELI). ELI is an intensive two and a half-day seminar that develops critical leadership skills for emerging performing arts professionals. Each year, a new cohort is invited to participate in ELI and attend APAP|NYC, APAP’s annual members conference held in New York City every January.

“We created ELI because there is a need in the field to retain people with 3-7 years of experience and equip them with the training and tools to take the next step in their career, becoming effective leaders in the performing arts,” says, Scott Stoner, vice president of programs of APAP. “It is important to stimulate conversation and provide a forum for these young leaders to grow and think about how leadership can operate on different levels and then take that knowledge and apply it first-hand.”

Approximately 25 participants are selected each year from a wide pool of applicants and are comprised of those who work directly in the presenting and touring field which includes, but is not limited to, performing artists, presenters, managers, agents, producers and professionals who work for arts councils or service organizations. ELI is an opportunity to engage in new professional relationships, exchange ideas, and become part of an expanding network of over 400 ELI alumni.

“Year after year I am inspired by artists, managers and cultural workers who are building careers in our field. My role is to co-facilitate dialogue, introduce mechanisms for action and ignite strong relationships development among the expanding ELI alumni network,” says, Rosalba Rolon, long-time co-facilitator of the ELI program.  “What makes the ELI effective is that participants are sharing their experiences among similar-minded individuals and expanding their individual perspectives to provide strategies that may ultimately permeate their organizations.”

Celebrating its 60th anniversary in 2017, APAP has been committed to leadership development in the changing ecology of the performing arts industry, providing avenues for members to expand and strengthen their leadership skills.  ELI 2017 will take place January 4-6, 2017 during the days leading up to APAP|NYC 2017 (January 6-10, 2017).

Participants of the 2017 Emerging Leadership Institute:

January 4-6, 2017

* Sara Bailey, program manager, Moss Arts Center at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

* Rachel Behring, programming specialist, AT&T Performing Arts Center, Dallas, TX

* Rachael Walters Brightwell, associate director of programing and outreach at Emory University’s Schwartz Center for Performing Arts, Atlanta, GA

* Robyn Busch, program associate, international, Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, Baltimore, MD

* Mickey Davis, program director, Des Moines Social Club, Des Moines, IA

* Meera Dugal, programming manager, David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center, New York, NY

* Grace Eubank, special events manager, Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), Brooklyn, NY

* Kevin Hasser, general manager, National Players, Olney, MD

* Ariana Hellerman, consultant, Hostos Center, Bronx, NY

* Isabella Hreljanovic, producer and performer, Manhattan, NY

* Daniela Jacobson, executive and development associate, New England Foundation for the Arts, Boston, MA

* Allison Kadin, marketing manager, Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), Brooklyn, NY

* Caroline Leipf, development and administration associate, Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

* Mari Levasheff, marketing business analyst, UC Santa Barbara Arts & Lectures, Santa Barbara, CA

* Ethan Messere, assistant director of presenting and touring, South Arts, Atlanta, GA

* Abbey Messmer, programming manager, Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts, Scottsdale, AZ

* Lauren Metts, senior manager of patron relations, The Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts, Louisville, KY

* Joe O’Neill, theatre programmer, City of Las Vegas Office of Cultural Affairs, Las Vegas, NV

* Hanna Oravec, assistant director for programs, Wesleyan University’s Center for the Arts, Middletown, CT

* Heena Patel, owner, MELA Agency, New York, NY

* Jonathan Serret, technical director of the Janet and Ray Scherr Forum Theatre at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza, Thousand Oaks, CA

* Katie Spohr, special events and booking manager, Indiana University Auditorium, Bloomington, IN

* Phinn Sriployrung, integrated marketing specialist, Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

* Willie Sullivan, front of house coordinator for University Musical Society, Ann Arbor, MI

* Kim Szeto, program manager for Creative City at the New England Foundation for the Arts (NEFA), Boston, MA

* Chelsea Walsh, artist liaison, Artis -Naples, Naples, FL

* Megan Pagado Wells, associate director of Artist Partner Program, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center at the University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, MD

* Amanda Wu, individual giving and special events manager, Cal Performances, Berkeley, CA

About the Association of Performing Arts Presenters (APAP)

The Association of Performing Arts Presenters, based in Washington, D.C., is the national service, advocacy and membership organization dedicated to developing and supporting a robust performing arts presenting field and the professionals who work within it. Our 1,500 national and international members represent leading performing arts centers, municipal and university performance facilities, nonprofit performing arts centers, culturally specific organizations, foreign governments, as well as artist agencies, managers, touring companies, and national consulting practices that serve the field, and a growing roster of self-presenting artists. As a leader in the field, APAP works to effect change through advocacy, professional development, resource sharing and civic engagement. APAP is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization governed by a volunteer board of directors and led by President & CEO Mario Garcia Durham. In addition to presenting the annual APAP|NYC conference – the world’s leading forum and marketplace for the performing arts (Jan. 6-10, 2017) – APAP continues to be the industry’s leading resource, knowledge and networking destination for the advancement of performing arts presenting.

About APAP|NYC

APAP|NYC is the world’s premier gathering of more than 3600 performing arts professionals, and the Association of Performing Arts Presenters 60th annual members conference, APAP|NYC 2017, in New York City at the New York Hilton Midtown and Sheraton New York Times Square. APAP|NYC features more than 1000 world-class artist showcases held around the city, an EXPO Hall boasting nearly 400 booths, dozens of professional development sessions, A-list keynote speakers, and pre-conference forums, many of which are free and open to the public and members. See more conference information at APAPNYC.org, and APAP membership information at apap365.org.

November 5, 2016 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, opportunity, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

#PERFORMANCE #ARTS #APAP #COIL –PS122 #NYC 1/3-22/17

WE RECOMMEND
ps122-logo-large-no-frame-yellow
 

PS122’s Coil 2017 Festival
January 3 – 22

Performance Space 122’s Coil Festival explores the vitality of live performance in New York City through contemporary artists from diverse genres, cultures, and perspectives. Full of inquisitive and dynamic work created locally, across the US, and around the world.

“We don’t present objects, static fixed ideas. These are living, breathing, complicated, flawed and wonderful experiences. Profound and unpredictable. Difficult.

There’s a rightful push for the work that we do to better reflect the society of ideas and people from which we spring. Sometimes we get this right, and sometimes we also push back when we’re told to make the work do something predictable, something certain. The potency of the work that PS122 presents comes from the fact that it should give you back the power to create its impact.

I am very proud that in my final year of Coil, PS122 again shows off its artists’ interdisciplinary chops – from the entirely constructed world of VR through a theater created purely of object, light and sound to visceral, confronting and raw movement.” – Vallejo Gantner, Artistic Director

Book Your Tickets Early:

PS122’s Coil Pass is always the best ticketing option that allows you to see everything: 8 tickets for $122.

Single tickets will go on sale November 14th and may be purchased online, via phone at 212-352-3101, or in person at venue box offices except where otherwise noted. Single ticket prices vary per event.

Click an artist or project for more info:
Yehuda Duenyas (USA)
CVRTAIN

Virtual Reality | World Premiere
PS122 Virtual Commission | Presented in partnership with Wallplay
January 3-15

Antony Hamilton and Alisdair Macindoe (Australia)
MEETING

Dance | US Premiere
Co-presented with La MaMa
January 4-8

Forced Entertainment (United Kingdom)
Real Magic

Theater | US Premiere
PS122 Commission | Co-presented with La MaMa
January 5-8

Pavel Zuštiak / Palissimo (NYC)
Custodians of Beauty

Dance, Performance
Co-presented with La MaMa
January 5-8

Kate McIntosh / SPIN (Belgium)
Worktable

Live Installation | US Premiere
Co-presented with The Invisible Dog Art Center
January 5-9

Molly Lieber and Eleanor Smith (NYC)
Basketball

Dance | World Premiere
PS122 Commission | Co-presented with Baryshnikov Arts Center
January 7-10

Britt Hatzius (United Kingdom / Belgium)
Blind Cinema

Film, Performance | NY Premiere
Co-presented with SVA Theatre in partnership with East Village Community School
January 9-12

Nicola Gunn (Australia)
Piece for Person and Ghetto Blaster

Theater, Dance | US Premiere
Co-presented with La MaMa
January 11-14

Daniel Fish (NYC)
Untitled

Time Based Art
Co-presented with The Chocolate Factory Theater
January 11-21

CATCH 75: Coil’d Again (NYC)
Dance, Theater, Performance | One Night Only!
January 15

Bobbi Jene Smith in collaboration with Keir GoGwilt (NYC)
A Study on Effort

Dance | NY Premiere
Presented by ArKtype / Thomas O Kriegsmann
and The Invisible Dog Art Center
in partnership with PS122
January 12-14

Yara Travieso (NYC)
La Medea

Interdisciplinary | World Premiere
PS122 Commission | Co-presented with BRIC and Dance Film Association
January 20-22


*Maximum (2) tickets may be redeemed per performance. Some restrictions apply. Questions? ps122.org/support or call 212-477-5829 x.302.

Performance Space 122’s Coil 2017 Festival is made possible in part by Australian Consulate-General in New York, Australia Council for the Arts, Axe-Houghton Foundation, Barragga Bay Fund, British Council, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Flanders State of the Art, Howard Gilman Foundation, The Harkness Foundation for Dance, The Hyde and Watson Foundation, Jerome Foundation, Lambent Foundation Fund of Tides Foundation, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Mertz Gilmore Foundation, Morrison Foerster Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, National Performance Network (NPN), New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, The New York Community Trust, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, Jerome Robbins Foundation, The Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, The Shubert Foundation, and The Harold & Mimi Steinberg Charitable Trust.

 

PS122’s Coil 2017 Festival is part of January in NYC is the Place to Be for the Performing Arts, celebrating the unmatched convergence of performing arts professionals, audiences and events in New York City. Every January, more than 45,000 people from around the globe flock to New York City for public festivals and industry gatherings, featuring over 1,500 performances by thousands of world-class artists of all disciplines and genres, including world music, theater, dance, jazz, and more.
January in NYC

November 4, 2016 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, HOLIDAY GUIDES, opportunity, Uncategorized, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

ARTS /MUSIC/FESTIVALS #APAP #globalFEST2017 NYC 1/8/17

Announcing globalFEST’s 2017 Lineup on January 8, 2017 at Webster Hall

Tickets Onsale now via Ticketmaster

Buy Tickets

Batida (Portugal/Angola): Booming Afro electronic dance party

Betsayda Machado y La Parranda El Clavo (Venezuela): Powerhouse Afro-Venezuelan vocalist (US Debut)

Jojo Abot (Ghana/Denmark/USA): Globetrotting experimental Afropolitan pop-soul

L’Orchestre Afrisa International et M’bilia Bel (DRC/USA): Tabu Ley Rochereau’s Congolese rumba legends return

Maarja Nuut feat. Hendrik Kaljujärv (Estonia): Digital Estonian folk soundscapes

Ranky Tanky (USA): Funky Gullah songs of the South Carolina Sea Islands

Rare Essence (USA): DC’s pioneering polyrhythmic Go-Go superstars

Rascasuelos (Argentina): Vanguard tango music and dance reimagined

Rudresh Mahanthappa’s Indo-Pak Coalition (USA): Deeply rooted Indo-jazz

Septeto Santiaguero (Cuba): Adventurous Grammy-winning son cubano stars

SsingSsing (Korea) Extravagant shamanistic Korean folk songs meet rock

globalFEST’s New Website Coming This November!

November 4, 2016 Posted by | ART, BUSINESS, CULTURE, ENTREPRENEURS, HOLIDAY GUIDES, LIFESTYLES, opportunity, We Recommend | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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